OCR Interpretation


Sword and shield. (Clinton, Miss.) 1885-1888, December 12, 1885, Image 2

Image and text provided by Mississippi Department of Archives and History

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87065018/1885-12-12/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

A
BUSINESS MENTION.
All communications intended for publi
cation, should be sent in Thursday morn
ing, and should be written on only one side
of paner. Everything intended for publica
tion should be written on separate pieces of
pa;>er from the business communications.
The columns of the Sword and Shield
will beepen to a limited number of reliable
advertisers ronable rates, but sd fraud
will not be aed rtised at any price,
however, one does creep in, it will be
prorutly exposed when found out.
Address all communications to
If
SWORD AND SHIELD.
Cliuton, Miss
Entend tt the Pott-ojflce *f Clinton, Mitt., •»
Second-flan* Matter.
Public Opiniou on the Atlauta
Election.
Prohibition has been so supremely
successful in the Fulton county(Ga.)
• election as to prompt the Pronibi
bitionists to declare that all candi
dates for the legislature, for Govern
or, for Congress and all other offices
in that State must be pronouncedly
in favor of Prohibition. The success
of the movement elsewhere in Geor
gia is phenomenal. Possibly this
does not call for comment, but the
careful observer will put with this
the Prohibition vote of 27,000 in
Ohio, of 30,000 in New Yoik, with
the passage of Prohibition laws in
Iowa, Kansas and Maine and will
conclude that a new element is ev
ident in the politics of the immediate
future.—New York World November
27th, 18835.
The stronger the Prohibitionists
become, the more easily they will be
weaned from their old political asso
Those who have left their
dations.
old parties to embark in the Prohi
bition movement on high principles
will not be likely to return. Hence
the movement is certain to gather
additional strength rather than to go
back, and it cannot fail to become a
most important element in future
elections.—New York World, Nov.
27 th, 1885.
Atlanta was almost the las*
stronghold of the so-called rum pow
er; but that city, the busiest, noisiest,
m >st prosperous and progressive
town of the South seemed about as
unlikely as New York or Baltimore
to vote out of existence one of its
most powerful and profitable inter
ests. Yet the Prohibitionists won
Atlanta on Wednesday, by a majority
of between two and three hundred.
Everywhere the persistent and pa
tient* workers who are engineering
the political side of the Prohibition
movement will be encouraged beyond
measure by the Atlanta victory.
Under the circumstances it means
more than the capture of a whole
State like New Hampshire, for ex
ample, for it shows that the big and
lively towns are not impregnable
even under Local Option. The Re
publican leaders are now more wor
ried by the amazing growth of the
Prohibition cause than they are by
any other woe that Heaven has sent
them.—New York Sun, Nov. 27th.
.
From the manner and the methods
with which the Prohibition move
ment is being pushed North and
South, there is some possibility that
it will become an element in the
next 1 residential contest, it t
managers can succeed in forcing the
issue on the regular party conven
tions. * * * Democrats
and Republicans will doubtless
watch the progress of this most in
tererting element in politics with
keen interest, because it threatens
bo'h parties with a dangerous in
trusion.—New York Sun. November
28th, 1885.
In the Southern States, Prohibi
tion has been singularly successful
and rapid in its advances. It has
met no defeats. Every point gained
lias been held,
the North, the Prohibition move
ment shows a different record. Re
markable victories have at times
been gained, but in most cases a ten
dency to reaction has soon afterward
b-*en obvious. Tais is a striking con
trast" Those who seek the reason for
this remarkable difference in the pro
gress of the Prohibitory movement
will find it without difficulty in the
faetthat at the South the Pro
hibitionists act like sincere men
who desire the success of a
oause, and not the elevation
or pecuniary emnluraent of in
dividuals or any spiteful punishment
of those who do not agree with them.
—New York Tribune, (Rep.), Nov.
28th. *
The issue (in Georgia) has divided
both parties and both races, but it
seems certain to enter into politics
hereafter. Already, it is said, an
effort is to be made in Georgia to
pledge all candidates for local legis
lative and State offices to Prohibition.
This doubtless has in view the pur
pose of making Prohibition a State
policy prescribed and enforced with
out regard to local preferences.
This will be pretty sure to array par
ties upon this line, and to people in
the North it will seem to be a curi
ous fact that the preponderance of
Prohibition sentiment is in the Dem
ocratic party in the South. It will
doubtless help the process of break
ing up the old political associations,
based upon national issues of a past
generation, and of effacing the color
line in politics. So far it cannot fail
to have a beneficial effect. . . . This
problem is by no ra* ans settled in the
North. . . The usual alternate (of
absolute Prohibition) has been an
easy license system, and experience
shows that the dimin', tion ol the ,j ^'l
which it effects is very slight,
there is a general dissatisfaction
the results is shown by the persistea
But at
* *
T a«
Wtvii
cy of the advocates of Prohibition
and the vote which they control,
even as an independent political par
ty. In this State, the vote increased
from about 24,000 last year to nearly
31,000 this year, and it threatens to
become a serious disturbing element
in the balance of parties. There is
little chance that it can attain its
purpose, either of controlling public
policy directly or of coercing either
party into supporting
but it furnishes to both
of
its doctrine;
parties an in
ducement to find some new solution
of the difficulty which shall produce
results more consonant with the sen
timents of rational temperance men.
—New York Times (Rep.), Nov.
27 th.
If
A WONDERFUL LIFE.
•»
Brilliant Career of an American Named
Ward.
The remarkable career of Ward, the
American soldier who preceded Gordon
in command of the foreign legion in
China, was related to a New York
Tribune reporter recently by a friend
of the soldier, who knew him from boy
hood. He said: "Ward was a most re
markable man—a greater man, in my
opiniou than Gordon, though the hero
of Khartoum commands my deep ad
miration. Ward was born in Salem,
Mass., and when he was a boy went to
sea with his father, who was a ship
master. When the Crimean war broke
out young Ward enlisted in the French
army, and became a sub-lieutenant.
Unfortunately he became involved in a
quarrel with his captain, and, resign
ing his commission, he challenged that
officer to a duel. The challenge was
accepted, and Ward killed the captain.
Years after, when fortune smiled ou
him. Ward sent a large sum of money
to Paris to be invested for the support
of the widow and child of his former
captuiu. Ward's next ventme was a
commercial one to Vera Cruz. It
proved unsuccessful, and lie was then
sent by me to the west coast of Mexico
to buy a lot of brass cannon which had
been condemned. He embarked on this
enterprise in a vessel which took dowu
to Central America a iot of Walker's
filibusters. The adventurous charac
ter of Waiker's enterprise appealed to
W aril's fancy, but he saw in it so much
to condemn and so much that was re
uguaut to him in the character of a
irgo part of those who made up the
filibustering parly that he did not join
the expedition.
"Having completed his work on the
west coast ot Mexico Ward went to
San Francisco and got a berth as an
officer of a ship going to China. He
rece.ved his discharge in China and
entered there the service of the empe
ror. He rose rapidly in favor and rank,
and organized ineForeign legion to light
for the emperor against Lie Taeping
rebels. He married a Chiuese lady of
high rank, and was made a mandarin
of their most exalted ordjy\ In order
to marry a woman of the rank which
he did he was told that he must re
nounce Christianity. He declined to
do this, and the matter was finally set
tled by liis marryiug her by proxy. He
became a citizen of Cniua and a subject
of the emperor. Ouce he was seized
by the English and French admirals
and kept lor some time a prisoner. He
was told that if he would claim Ameri
can citizenship he would be liberated.
This lie refused to do, saying:
" *1 was born in America, and love
my native land, but 1 have sworu alle
giance to the emperor aud am a Chi
nese.'
"He was finally released, and con
tinued his most successful aud brilliant
He ordered three
in
in
a
£
military career.
gun bouts built in America, which were
to go up the Pekin river aud the canal
aud fly the mandarin flag before the
g ;vtes 0 f p e kiu. I was building the
boats for him when lie was killed. Ho
was the most powerful man in China,
uud had he lived 1 believe ho had the
genius and the daring to have made
empire. When our civil war broke out
wrote to me: 'My heart is with my
muive laud in her struggle against
rebellion. Were 1 free 1 wotil t return
at once to off r my life aud my sword
country. But my work is here.'
"« '"H ' ,ml ° f T*"*
J
which he was besieging. He was one
of the bravest, most temperate, up
right, and honorable of men; oi bottud
less ambition amt d. zzittig genius. He
was a young, man only 36 or 37 at the
time ot his death. Tneiigu he never re
ceived a liber:.1 education tie was one
of the besl-iutormed men 1 ever saw,
a constant student, a good linguist,
and a great reader ot nooks of all
kinds.
it
of
I >
-- m •
U -Clfi Siini Bents tl»u It. cord.
"Wo beat the world on mowers and
reapers," says an official of the
Bureau of Agriculture. "litis depart
ment has fluisheit a compilation of
ffigures on the exports of farmin'«: ma
chinery from this country. Before
1864 agricultural implimenls had no
designation as such in our statistical
repo'rts. They were simply included
in other classes of manufactured arti
cles, aud not until 1870 was there a
division of these implements so that
we can know just what was exported.
But from 1870 to 1884, inclusive, we
sent to other countries over $36,500,000
of agricultural machinery, aud of this
nearlv oDe-half consisted of mowers
and reapers. Great Britain has pa
tronized our manufacturers of these
machines to the amount of over $5,000
000 in the past fifteen j-ears; Germany,
over $4,000,000; Australia over $1,000,
000; France, nearly $2,500,000; the Ar
gentine Republic, over $1,000,000, and
the British possessions in North Amer
ica over $500,000. Oar export of agri
cultural implements jumped up from a
little over $600.000 in 1864 to over
$1,000,000 in 1870, and to nearly $3,
600,000 in 1884.
"There is a significance in the fig
ures, aside from the general interest
which will be felt in this evidence of
appreciation of Yankee ingenuity.
Wherever this labor-saving machinery
goes, there will be increase in the
crops and saving in the cost of their
production and narvest. All of this
has a very impartant bearing on tho
future of agricultural produtiou. The
ereatost demand for our implements
come from the new colonies, where
the population is increasing most rap
idlv. Last year the 400,000,000 people
China bought only $79 worth of
from this
11
of
agricultural implements
country, while the 2,500,000 Chilians
took from us $84,195, The general use
of this improved machinery in now
countries iusures its use in their devel
opment—when their agriculture will
constitute a large percentage of the
agriculture of the globe. This is a sub
Amencau fanners to think

ject for
about,"
STEDMAN & CO.
par
to
is
its
either
BARGAIN SALE.
—COMMENCING
THURSDAY , NOVEMBER 19
in
sen
men.
Nov.
we will offer
200 PATTERN HAT3 an! BONNETS
From a Sheriff's sale of a leading
New York Millinery establishment
Goods that are
at from $2 to $5.
worth from $2 to $15.
STEDMAN & CO.
the
in
York
boy
re
my
hero
ad
to
ship
a
that
was
ou
a
It
had
this
to
re
a
the
join
the
to
an
He
and
of
re
to
He
He
The above A-e circulated as well
as we could in the form of a dodger
Very tiw saw it, and
last week,
those that did paid no attention
it, but what can we do?
7 # «ft _
no daily paper,
these little sheets,
that it is one of Stedman & Co.'s
We have
Better glance
It may happen
and we will have several things to
bet veen now and Christ
announce
mas.
TOTS IM COMING!
Holiday goods will be here, and
many si bargain for you and yours
—but to the Hats and Bonnets
we commenced telling about. We
have them, and just what we say
they are:
Fatterns [from a leading New York
Establishment
There is or was, Two hundred;
good many have boen sold; but not
all, or the choice, by any means—
the very style you want may be
here, and it it is, you can have
at less than half it cost to make.
This is our big advauiage, keep
ing buyers always in New York* at
tending every sale, every auction
sale, every sheriff's sale. In
place like New York, where fail
ures occur nearly every day of the
year, is it to be wondered at that
we own goods lower than any house
in the State? Is it not a fact that
we dictate prices in this market?
We have these bargains in some
one line or another always-the
telling you of it is the trouble,
tell it is to print a dictionary of
merchandise. To make the telling
clear and lull, and short and con
sultable —like a dictionary—is hard
to do. To make you believe the
simple truth is harder still, but
goods speak for themselves, and
prices tell their own story, and
cash buyers are fast finding out
where their money lasts longest.
Steelman Sl Co,
To
Ho
J
L U J,11
nrui
It
Elle» i'U JIN, hi.
Importunt to riano buyers.
Our «OLD WATCH SOUVENIR
OFFER extended another month.
To allow patrons in distant
States to aixtil themselves of this
GRAND OFFER, ve hold it Oj>eil
until January Is/ next. 1'osi
tiivly no further extension given.
THE OFFER.
the
of
no
a
we
this
pa
Ar
and
a
$3,
fig
of
the
this
tho
The
rap
of
this
A $50 gold watch present
ed every »pot cash purchaser
of a Piano during Deeembei.
For full particulars send for cir
culars.
Boll in Cash by Jan. 1.
I
[TV
I III)
i
[7
A chance for Organ buyers
also. Send cash before January
1 st, for an Organ worth $80 or
upwards, and we will give with it
an Elegant Clock of beafdiful de
sign. A real Art Gem, costly
and beautiful, that wilt be es
teemed a valuable Souvenir by all
who receive it.
Send quick for Catalogues and
Circulars. Orders must be in by
January 1 st. Instruments gnar
anteed, and money refunded if
noi satisfactory. Purchasers take
no rish. Address
Minn Ji Bates Wli'Tii
msiiiHw.5aiaiiinli.it 4 .
LM.S.M. I.
use
now
will
the
sub
How Doe Your Watch Run?
CO.
A watch impregnated with mag*
It will
'*
netism cannot "keep time,
vary irregular, gaining and losing
and stopping, in the most annoying
sort of way. It has been found that
this magnetism or electric influence
is the direct cause of the "queer
freaks" and unaccountable behavior
19
of fine watches, and is the secret en
emy which has undermined the rep
utation andjbaffled the skill of our
best watchmakers,
Giles Bro. & Co. have published a
very interesting little pamphlet de
scribing the effect of magnetism in
watches, which can be had free on
application. It also describes the
"Anti-Magnetism Shield for Watch
es," which has been proved to be a
perfect protection against the mag
netic and electric influence and is
specially advantageous in Railway
service where these influences are
very strong, and will prevent the
breakage of main springs in cyclones
and magnetic storms. Your jeweler
can furnish or procure you this pro
tection, if not, send to Giles Bro. &
Co., the Chicago Jewelers, for a de
scriptiv.e circular which will be mail
ed free on application.
leading
are
CO.
well
dodger
and
to
Co.'s
have
at
happen
to
Christ
A tall young man, with a complexion
of the rich color of the ripe chestnut,
an i with limbs as cleanly cut as those
of Michael Angelo's statue of David,
called upon President Cleveland the
other day, and asked the appointment
of a cadetship at West Point. It was
young Holc-in-the-Day, the son of the
noted Chippewa chief, and now the
king of all the Ciuppcwas. I mot him
this morning. He is about 18 years
old, is over six feet tall, and he has an
eye like that of a- young eagle. A
romance clusters around him, and it
was at Washington, where his father,
the noied Cuippewa king, met the
woman who became his mother. It
was in 1867 lhat oid Hole-iu-the-I)ay
came here on business with the presi
dent. lie was made much of by the
newspapers, feted by society, and at
the National Hotel, where he was stop
ping, he was spoken of as the rich In
dian king, who owned the greater part
of the lauds of the Northwest. At this
hotel there was a pretty Irish chamber
maid, who did up the old chief's room.
The two met. They looked, and from
their eyes sprang love. Chief Ho!e-in
tlic-dav, who had met the belles of
Washington, passed them by, aud
chose the chambermaid. He proposed,
bite accepted. They were married,
and she went back to Minnesota an
Indian queen. From the marriage
sprang this boy, who has now inherited
his father's position. The old king be
got the jealousy of some of the Indian
tribes by bis union with a white wife,
and they suspected him of treacher
ously giving away their lauds. They
assassinated him. Mrs. Hole-in-tho
Day stiil lives. Her boy has the true
military bearing about him and he
looks aud walks like the kiug that ho
is. Ho dresses in Americau clothes,
and talks pure Anglo-Saxon. Gov.
Ramsey is pushing his claims here, and
ho will probably receive an appoint
ment.— Washington Cor. Cleveland
Leader.
and
yours
We
say
York
a
not
means—
be
it
keep
at
auction
In a
fail
the
that
house
that
market?
some
of
telling
con
hard
the
but
and
and
out
To
V Augustin Daly's N ervousness.
The acute nervous temperament of
Augustin Daly, the theater man, shows
clear through to his exterior. His ges
tures are quick and jerky. He takes
no paius with his dress aud garments,
slightly awry, give to him an addition
al air of intellectual wtlduess. On the
evenings of lirst performances in his
house lie sometimes \jiscloses his per
turbation to the audiences in funnily
grotesque respectes to their plaudits,
and there are numerous stories of his
cxcitcmeut bohiud the curtain on these
trying occasions; but it remained for a
clerkm a store to construe his mental
tension as lunacy. A pistol was need
ed in the rehearsal of a new piay the
other day, and Daly stopped at a gun
smith's to buy one. He was in a hur
ry, his manner was distraught by
weightier considerations, aud his toilet
was uncommonly careless.
"Give me a .single-barreled pistol,
he said, rather imperatively;
mon one will do.
please.
.The man behind the counter eyed
the stranger suspiciously, with a criti
cal though momentary study of his
disheveimeut aud flutter, and apolo
getically said: "You will please excuse
me, sir, but I'd rather not sell a lire
arm to you to-day."
The manager's laugh
enough to be maniacal, but his explan
ation' of who ite was aud what he
wanted the pistol for established his
sanity to the clerk's satisfaction. There
were many years of bankruptcy during
which suicLlu would have been almost
reasonable in Daly, but for several sea
sons he has been so prosperous that he
promises to become me wealthiest
showman in New York.
IJ
••a cum
Iij quick, if you
1>
was loud
me daughter ot a well-known wo
man is thus described by a correspond
ent: The genuine Newport belle, for
she bas lived there siuce she was a
child, is Maud llowc,daughter of Juiiu
Ward Hoive, and who, though now 30,
is still oui to as beautiful as when she
sat for îlxe portrait now iu the Corco
Gallery'at Washington, wnich at
tracted so much attention when it was
exhibited at the ltoyal Academy. She
is a striking-looking woman, with an
"exquisitely turned jaw,"a perfect neck,
and an artistic head—round which she
binds a wreath of ivy, iu the style of
the winner of the Olympian games- She
is a lady of caprices. At present
esthetic garments are her fad, and she
attires hèrsolf iu limp, loose gowns of
dull faded colors, wnich cling about
her in a way that would have charmed
Rossetti. Dogs are, with her, another
mania.
ran
Charles Sumner's Washington home,
his only home during the later years of
his life, now belongs to William W.
Corcoran. No traces of its former
illustrious occupant remain. The fur
niture, selected with much care, has
been scattered far und wide under the
hammer of the auctioneer, liis pic
tures are all gone, and there are few
things at the capitol to remind one of
the upholder of the Union.
BroisJi Sleeper; to »orttwesterp Peats
On and after Thursday, Novem
ber 19th, the Illinois Central R. ft
will run a weekly Through Sleeper *
to Pana, Decatur, .Bloomington^
Mendota, Freeport, Dubuque, Man
chester. Waterloo, Fort Dodge,
Sioux City and other Northwestern
points, leaving New Orleans at 6
p. m„ Hammond 7.57 p. m., every
Thursday and Jackson, Miss., 12:53
a. m., Jackson, Tenn.. 11:55 a. m.
every Friday until further notice.
This arrangement will greatly ac
commodate Returning Exposition
Tourists, and Louisiana, Mississippi
and Tennessee Land Seekers.
J. w. COLEMAN,
Assistant General Passenger Agent.
a
a
is
&
Railroad 1 ime- T ab L
Vick «burn A Meridian Railroad.
Echt Bound Trains.
Mail—Leaves Vicksburg 12:50 pm. arrive«
at Jackson 2:4 ) a>.d leaves at 2:45 pne;
arrives at Meridian at 6:30 p m.
Express, or Accommodation—Leave Vicks
burg 6:00 p m, and arrive s at Jackson 7.IK)
p m.
Local Freight leaves Vicksburg 7am a m
arrives at Jackson at 10:60 and haves at
11:25 a m, arrives at Meridian a» S COp ro
nV,.s; Bound Trains.
Mail, lenv« ? Meridian 7:20 am
Jackson 10:45 and lea vas at 0:50 a m ar
riv at Vicksburg 12:40 a m.
Express or 3Accommodation—Leaves Jack
son 7:00 p m, arrives at Vicksburg 9:00
p. ML
Local Freight, leaves Meridian 7:30 a m, ar
rives in Jackson at 4:05 and leaves at 4:33
p m arrives in Vicksburg 8:30 p m.
arrives in
liliiiv:. tulnl Kk.-foa«.
Goi'ia North —
Express—Leaves New Orleans 9:15 a ta, as
rives at Jackson 5:45 p m leaves 6;C6, ar
rives at Grand Junction at 3:10 a m.
Mail-Leaves New Orleans 5:30 p m. arrives
at Jackson 12:35 am, leaves 12:40
reaches Grand Junction 8:55 a m.
Mixed—Leaves New Orleans 7:15 a m rescu
es Jackson 5:30 p m, leaves G:15 p m
reaches Grand Junction 1:15 a in.
Goinj South —
Express—Leaves Grand Junction 1:20 p m,
reaches Jackson 10:30 p m, leaves 10:35 p
in, reaches New Orleans 7 a m.
Mail—Leaves Grand Junction 7:10 p m, ar
rives at Jackson- 8:30 a m, leaves 3:35 am
arrives at New Orleans 10:45 a m.
Mixed—Leaves Grand Junction 9:50 am, ar
rives at Jackson S:t 0 a m, leaves 9:50 a ra
arrives at New Orleans 5:20 p m.
SIOOO REWARD
for *ay machine hulling and cleaning lit forH
market m mu«h Clover in
Double
Huiler. II
has mad«
$100
JJAÏ ae lb.
VICTO
often
Victor
IN
ONE
ILLUSTRATED
Pamphlet mailed FRI*. "
NEWARK MACHINE CO.
* 2TEWABK. O.
>AT
ANY ONE WISHING
A kii Ui
Ö
Will do well to address THIS OF'
They will get such terms as
will enable almost any family to pos
one of the best makes.
FICE.
ess some
ft
&
rti
*

LL
MEMPHIS, TENN.
Dealer in all kinds of Marble
Work, such as Tombstones, Monu
ments, Mantles, etc., etc. All ot
which will be sold at extremely
LOW FIGURES.
W rile for what wouwant and
stimates. It will be to your in
to do so.
THOMAS MA YD WELL,
Memphis, Tenn
t* ü
m * ht
£
>
Most Cf-onrmical :ci;t <tnn:b!e. Cheapest in the
market, qualitvconsidered. SAW ]VllL,E,S,
COJtN SHELLF.RS CfBEit MILLS,
COTTON PLANTERS AXO STAND
ARD IRPLEIIEXTS GENERALLY.
Send for Catalogue. A. B. FARQUHAR,
Pennsylvania Agricultural '-Vorks, York, Pa. .
CARDEN?
!
HAVE YOU A
SEEDS
IF YOU HAVE
YOU V/ILL NEED
Ana win want "ne bnt at tne lean money. Then
my new Seed Catalogue will aurpriee 70a. No matter
where yon have been dealing ü mil save money. It ia
mailed Tree to all, and yon ought to bave It
before buying anywhere.
WM. H. MAULE.
129 & 131 Front St. Philadelphia.
i
Farquinr'B Improved Cotton Plantet
Very Simple and Perfect ia iu Operation ; Drop,
„ Unrolled Seed or Fertili
3Sbrer with reni»rt»»b!e reg
zau<arityinanr
K iCBk desired r:r
„apt. Jt
Cheei)f"',
a aidfcg r 1 mot Relia ui«
eSjgPJy .Xpn jand Best
'»OâiMn-^cOTTüîl
PLANTER in existence.
SEND .FOR CAT*LOUIE.
Addreaa. A. B. FAUQL1U E. York. Ps.
i é
«Sr«
.
!
ifliS
9>*
PIANOS ORGANS
The demand for the Improved Vaso» àHMOm
Piakos la now so Urge that a Becomt oddbion to the
factory lias become imperative. Do
quarter as much tuning «R Pianos onJbeprevaillns,
wrest-pln system. Consnlt GnUdoguf, free.
190 S ytes of Oboans, <22 to $900. For Cash, Easy
Payments, or Rented. j
Mason & Hamlin Organand PianoCo., j
NEW YORK : BOSTON : CHICAGO.
■ 7-1
LATEST AND BEST
HAVE YOU SEEN THE NEW IMPROVED
SINGER
Sewing Machine
WITH HIGH ARM?
It is very light running
-AND
makes the finest stitch of any machine made.;
CALL, EXAMINE & BE CONVINCED
Singer needles 15 cts per doz„ two doz. 25 cts., Shuttles 25cts, Oil 5 cts bottle
MCCALLS'S BAZAR PATTERNS.
The Singer Manufacturing Co
183 Washington St., Vicksburg, Miss.
c
ATTACHMENT.
02
«5
«s. J*; m
So
o
(1)
&
+->
S'* *5^
L
0
d
sL3ldWQ2
£ os
ks U
k
M
0
<; a
ft
14 CO
j +»
« 8
^ 3 E
> 2
r o
<58
CD *
0
in
02
00
2
r /s
AS
A
a
a
o
*
0
o
tt.
fop}

V.
s:
30
H 31QH-N9J.AftS HAIM
T2
Louis \ Grünewald.
3NTe~w Orleans. -
La
no
1
U
Li.
Pianos
& Organs
Leading Pianos of the World,
&
•J
V '
FiscDer.
ORGANS FROM ALL THE LEADING FACTORIES—
Shoninger ., Clough and Warren ,
— :o:
MUSIC and MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS at Wholesale and Retail
Everything in music line at lowest rates.
Catalogues mailed free upon application. Address—
Louis Grünewald.
Under Grunet>ald Opera House, New Or leas, L
-: THE :
O.W. Müler Carriage Co.
ixin
iwjj «

UKfiF.
Si: Vi
sawte
fill
*FfiV
;
'

Manufacture a large variety tf
LIGHT and HEAVY CARRIAGES, PHAETONS,
CARTS, BUGGIES, WAGONS, &C.,
After the most approved designs at the very lowest
prices consistent with good workmanship.
—50,000 voHIclcs —
of onr manufacture aro now in nse in this and
foreign countries and attest the excellence of
our goods by tli© universal satisfaction wnicn they
give.-Every vehicle is W A Bit ANTED.-Special
attention will be given to mail orders.
CATALOGUES FREE.
D. W. Miller Carriage Co
E. Fifth St., Culvert St. and Eggleston Ave.,
CINCINNATI. O,
*>
HE
:J u .A-'
- j? *
JS .

4,
> k K
jl ^ r\
■ \.
\ U j:
/' v -V
SL-, f
1 i!
: in
I V
^ AS*
•V
lif
v
m
i
/

m
.f!
! V
r
n
-, t
: y
üyf V
1 j
»
. I
■a
i
S' t
C" ê
?
st
i fin
yr
S'%
?
.
1
A
.
il
Coughs, Colds, Con
sumption, Cioup, Ca
li larrh, Influenza, Bronchitis,Whoop
|i j V g Cough, Diseases of the Lungs,
! ! Throat, and Bronchial Tubes.
CURES
1 LEADS ALL LUNG REMEDIES,
j _ .. .
j SOLE tofcNufrAG 1 üftErle».
I'-
Get the genuine from your Drug
gist. Prepared only by the
»
iMaislioîîS Medicine Ganipaay
rr.S'N.
tt£
leas,
HELP WANTED*« entales.
tttANTED—I n
'VV and county,
every town city
an intelligent, ener
getic lady of good address and
business ability, to introduce to the
trade and consumers Madam Deans
Celbrated Spinal Supporting
Corset. Retails at 81.50 Splend
tly advertised: highly recommend
ed by the leading Modiste,fashionable
Dressmakers and the most eminent
Physicians of the United States and
Curope. Liberal pay.
making5*15 to 865 weekly. Address
Lewis Schiele & (Jo.
some
Vi
!(
'
Agents are
390 Hoard way, X. Y.
of
m
r I
MKis
7:
il
♦ I
,L
ÖÄ
'•Tr
m
wm
H
Â
j:
tysr
■■ i
s r tt a 4
- h P g
J V :
J fi r i
\ P.
v
*
c
! :
i!
v»i r
IrT?
i
! r r
t,

- tj
; .j C f, rt;
a & p s
n
s
(
il
m
g
j o
g i b
^ s H, t' & 4 s &
K O o g F * O rt
P ® §
® O
; 11 *
•V J
A ï
M
0
r+ v* il
' CD R .
all!
WILL BUY 0NL
ALL RIGHT
Self.feod,STRAW *
__ hay CCTTEK.
The knife it Steel, and temyered.and
Æ I >1 fastened to lever with three boitf.
I and can be easily taken off to sharpen.
& J The length of cat is regulated hv the
- lever to which the kntfe is bo.ted.
^^^"•"The higher the lever is rawed, th.
longer it will cut. All are warranted. Send lor
circular which wi " be mailed FRÜH.
iXElVAUK MACHINE CO.. Newark. <k
^9
I
_ STHWA CMJjffl B
S German Asthma (urc do erf ails to giYe j
rciw/m tUe worst
' sbl o Bleep ; effects cn res where a lothersrau. ff I
»

xml | txt