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The Columbus commercial. (Columbus, Miss.) 1893-1922, October 14, 1917, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87065028/1917-10-14/ed-1/seq-1/

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VOL. XXIV. NO. 49.
COLUMBUS, MISS., SUNDAY MORNING, OCTOBOBER 14, 1917.
Semi-Weekly, $3.00 Per Yer.
W..C.T.U. TO
BEGIN MEETING
HERE MONDAY
EXTRA SESSION
OF LAWMAKERS
WOMEN WILL
MAKE EFFORT
TO SAVE FOOD
"BUY A.BOND"
EMBLAZONED IN
COUNCIL BUYS
FURNITURE FOR
HIGH SCHOOL
COMES TO END
FIREY LETTERS
mm
ARRANGEMENTS FOR 34TH
ANNUAL SESSION IS
COMPLETE.
SPLENDID PROGRAM
International Problems Will
Be Discussed by Several
Famous Speakers.
Problems which face the United
States and nations now engaged in
belligerent activities will come up for
discussion at the coming meeting of
the Miwissipi Woman's Christian
Temperance Union, which will assem
ble here in annual amalgamation
next Monday, October 15, and the
session will be known as the "War
Convention."
it is expected that something like
one hundred delegates, representing
practically every auxiliary in the
state, will be in attendance, and for
several weeks past members of the
local organization have been busily
engaged in making preparations to
entertain the visitors. These prepa
rations have been completed, and all
visitors during their stay here will
be domiciled in private homes, the
citizens of Columbus being only too
glad to extend every possible courte
sy and hospitality to these noble wo
men who are working so dilligently
and so effectively to banish the
demon rum from the American con
tinent. Tha convention, which will hold
its sessions at the First Baptist
diurch, will be presided over by the
president, Mrs. S. E. Stanley, of
Brooiuvllle, and other officers ex
pected to be present are: Miss M. L
MotstEwnery, of ; StrkvilleL. iacfr
president; "Mrs. W. W. Scales, of
Starkville, recording secretary, and
Miss Minnie Walker, of Starkville,
treasurer. ,
The principal object of the union
is to rid the state and nation of whis
key and other intoxicating beverages
and the program has naturally been
arranged with the view of emphazing
the importance of this work. The
deleterious effect that alcohol has
upon both mind and body will be es
pecially stressed, and the organiza
tion jvill doubtless adopt resolutions
indorsing the action of Congress in
banishing liquor from the American
army.
The meeting is considered an un
usually important one, and the dele
gates will devote mosrt of their time
to the transaction of business. They
will, however, find time for a few
pleasant diversions, among them be
ing an automobile ride over the city
and a rc-.tption at the Industrial In
stitute and College.
The election of officers will take
place on Wednesday afternoon, after
which the convention will adjourn.
Meeting Postponed.
The congregational meeting, which
was to have been held at the First
Presbyterian church this morning,
has been indefinitely postponed.
There will' be no preaching rervice at
this church today.
COLLEGE GIRLS
KNIT FOR HEROES
STUDENTS OF I. I. & C. MAKING
GARMENTS FOR AMERICAN
SOLDIERS IN FRANCE.
Students of the Mississippi Indus
trial Institute and College have ac
quired the knitting habit, and are
busily engaged in making socks,
sweaters and other wearing apparel
for the American soldiers in France.
Every afternoon scores of young
ladies can be seen on the campus
and on the streets near the college
walking slowly along, with yarn and
knitting needles in hand, deftly fash
ioning various articles which are to
go to the fighters across the ocean.
They even take" their knitting along
with them when they visit sodawater
and ice n-eam parlors, and work in
dustriously while waiting to be serv
ed.
A Red Cross chapter has recently
been organizedat the college, and
this has given a new impetus to the
wprk ,as the youiig ladies are very
much interested in, war activities of
every character.
WORK WAS FINISHED FRI
DAY, AND SESSION
ADJOURNED.
VARDAMAN SPEAKS
Members Decide to Listen to
Address, but Bar Politics
Therefrom.
Jackson, Miss., Oct. 13. Official
ly and according to the journals the
two houses of the Mississippi Legis
lature adjourned at noon Friday, as
provided by resolution, having com
pleted the work for which they were
cajled into extraordinary session ly
Gov. Bilbo. Actually and as a mat
ter of fact, it was some three hours
after noon when messengers, appear
ed befor Gov. Bilbo to inquire if he
had any further communications to
make to the respective bodies.
"Say to the speaker of the House
and to the president of the Senate
that there is not another thing that
I desire to submit for consideration
at this time, but wait until the regu
lar session Convenes in 1918, and then
see what I may have to tell you," was
the response of the executive. "I do
want to express my appreciation of
the way in which the Legislature has
responded to the call to enact the
pressing and important remedial leg
islation which it became my duty to
recommend, and to assure you that
what has been done will without
doubt bring nothing but material
good to aU the people of the state.
"It has been said that every gover
nor who has had to call an extra ses
sion of the Legislature during his
term has had caus?e to regret it. I
caji say as o.Vbsf. tbat I tiya so far
seen no cause for regret in anything
that has been done, and ilo not expect
any such outcome," was Gov. Bilbo's
closing rbmment.
The session just closed has been
quite remarkable for the amount of
constructive work which has; been
done in so comparatively short a timf
as 15 working legislative days. Out
of more than 100 bills introduced in
the two branches, 75 per cent were
of a general nature, and more than
80 per cent were enacted. Of those
enacted, only one was returned with
out approval, and that was in order to
keep the record straight, and was ex
pected. Into a session unique in the history
of Mississippi for its lack of political
wrangling, politics full-panoplied en
tered Thursday when the house of
representatives spent a forenoon
quarreling over whether or not to in
vite Senator James K. Vardaman to
address it, and after squabbling
over passing the state council of de
fense measure, opposition to which
centered in a pro-Vardaman group.
The Vardaman debate opened with
an invitation but the invitation had
strings,' to it. The junior senator was
invited to speak, and requested to"
keep away from political, issues.
Senator Vardaman spoke about
thirty minutes. He took a fling at
what he called "the serpentine pre3s"
and made a plea for unity of purpose,
calling frequently upon God to pro
tect Mississippi.
Senior to Give Play.
The Senior Class, of the I. I. and
C, will have the first affair of the
season when they present their play
early in November. It will be stag
ed by Miss Emma Ody Pohl, and
judging from her past plays, it is go
ing to be a tremendous success. Mrs.
Rice Gaither, who is famous as the
author of the Pageant of 1914, will
have charge of the stage scenery and
properties?. The Seniors are very
fortunate in having secured Mrs.
Gaither's services, as she possesses a
most wonderful appreciation of the
aesthetic. The entrance fee will be
very reasonable reserved seats, CO
cents; faculty 25 ents and college
girls 15 cents. Tickets will be on
sale at an early date.
Officers Make Official Vi.it.
The members of the Order of
Eastern Star n held a special meeting
last night at the Masonic Hall, the
occasion being an official visit of
Mrs. Minnie Grayson, of Biloxi, State
Grand Matron, and Mrs. Barr, of
West Point, district Grand Matron
Mr. F. D. McCullough, the State
Grand Patron, of this city, was? also
present
After a business session, a banquet
was enjoyed.
TO CO-OPERATE WITH
HOOVER ON CONSER
VATION CAMPAIGN.
TO START SUNDAY
Miss Caulfield, Secretary of
Woman's Defense Council,
Sends Out Letters.
Miss Annie Caulfield, of this city,
secretary of the Woman's Auxiliary
of the Mississippi Division of the
National Defense Council', has at the
request of Mrs. Edward McGehee,
of Como, the president, sent letters
to the officers' of all local organiza
tions throughout the state urging
them to observe the "clean-up" food
campaign during the week beginning
Sunday, October 28.
The Woman's Council in Mississip
pi is working in connection with
State Food Administrator Harding
and hopes, through this campaign, to
impress upon hou.-ewives throughout
the commonweath the necessity for
conserving ami economizing in the
use of food.
Herbert C. Hoover, the national
food administrator, thinks that the
defeat of Germany depends largely
upon the ability of the United States
to furnish her foreign allies all the
provisions they need, and for this
reason it is important that American
housewives.' praHice the most rigid
ecnomy in their kitchens. He is
urging them to do this, and asks that
the "clean-up" food campaign be
carried out as a part of the official
campaign for economy in the use of
provisions of every character,
Many Attend Revival.
Hundreds of people are attending
each of the revival services which are
being conducted at the first Metho
dist church by Rev. W. B. Hogg. A
meeting for men will be held this' af
ternoon at 3 o'clock. Rev. Hogg will
preach this morning at 11 oWock and
again this evening at 7:30 o'clock.
Mr. E. O. Kennedy has accepted a
position in the shoe department ut
Simon Loeb and Bro.
Mr. and Mrs. C. L. Egger have
named their daughter Willodine.
GERMAN OFFICIAL
QUITS HIS POST
MINISTER OF MARINE TENDERS
RESIGNATION AS RESULT
OF MUTINY.
Amsterdam, Oct. 13. Vice Ad
miral von Cupelle, the German min
ister of marine, has resigned, accord
ing to the Frankfurter Zeitung.
Vice Admiral Edward von Capelle
was one of the administrative direc
tors in the ministery of marine be
fore the war and had served as a Cap
tain at sea. In March, 1916, he suc
ceeded Admiral von Tirpitz as im
perial minister of the navy.
Several times since then von Ca
pelle has appeared before the Reich
stg with opi :tniKt !-' slMlvmenU' regard
ing the progress of the unrestricted
submarine campaign as lute as Aug.
26, 1917, defending the U-boat policy
of his predecessor and himself at a
meeting of the Reichstag main com
mittee. Vice Admiral von Capelle an
nounced in the Reichstag last Wed
nesday that a plot had been discover
ed in the navy to paralyze the effi
ciency of the fleet and force the gov
ernment to make peace. He raid that
the guilty parties had received their
just deserts, and attempted to link
Socialists with the plot. The imperial
German chancellor, Dr. Michaelis,
also spoke of the existence of a con
spiracy in the navy and asserted that
certain deputies were involved in the
revolt. . .
The Socialists; and their newspapers
have attacked both the chancellor and
the vice admiral for their statements.
Candy Kitchen Open.
Mr. Louis Christ, of Fulton, Ky.,
on yesterday opened a candy kitchen
aud cobfetUuneiy in the Ezell build
ing on Main street He will sell all
kinds of candies and soft drinks.
' ! 1 W J
REV. W. B.
Rev. Hogg, who is chaplain
inducting a most successful revival
mis my. services are being held
afternoon a service will be held at
Rev. Hogg has been Ordered t
here the coming week.
ITEMS OF INTEREST
OVER THE COUNTRY
GIST OF THE NEWS GATHERED
HERE AND THERE AND PRE
SENTED IN BRIEF FORM.
Frosts in the north central area
did considerable damage to rotton,
according to the weekly crop bulletin.
Some cotton was killed in northern
Arkansas and killing frostv vccurred
in Oklahoma. Damage wai done lo
yally in Tennessee. Light to heavy
frosts fell in Texas, Mississippi nor
thern Alabama and Georgia, but lit
tle damage was reputed.
" Liberty Loan, managers are plan- j
ning to take their campaign to the
skies. On October 20, forty-live
aviators and eight balloonists will
bombard towns, cities and training
camps, from coast to coast, with red,
white and blue paper bombs whose
contents will be, not powerful ex
plosives, but powerful apper.'s to pur
chase Liberty Bonds.
A general order was promulgated
at Camp Sheridan In Montgomery
last week forbidding soldiers to pa
tronize the restaurants and lunch
stands near the camp wh'ch employ
women as waitresses.
Subscriptions to the second Liber
ty Loan nmong the soldiers at Fort
Oglethorpe so far have reached rc.ire
than $350,000. Six regiments at the
camp have subscribed the following
amounts: Sixth Infantry, $lVi(M)0;
Fifty-Third Infantry, $59,000; Fifty-
Fourth Infantry, $65,000; Eleventh.
Fifty-Second and Fifty-Sixth Infan
try, $175,000.
New methods and equipment to
save the $50,000,000 wortn of eggs'
wasted every year in the United
States and means of eliminating
waste in handling of poultry are being
discusswd at a conference of represen
tative poultry and egg shippers with
the Food Administration.
The Philadelphia navy yard has
been designated by Secretary Danie's
as the clearing station for comfort
gifts for enlisted men of the navy.
"Cheating Cheaters."
Max Marcin's sensational comedy,
"Cheating Cheaters," was presented
at the Columbus Theater last night,
and proved to be in every way worthy
of the praise bestowed upon it by the
critics both in New York and in other
cities throughout the country. ,
Both the play and the presenting
company are excellent, and it is to be
sincerely regretted that there was
such a small audience present, as Co
lumbus can not expert to get meri
torious theatrical attractions unless
theater-goers patronize them more
liberally.
E. & W. Dashwood collars for men
and boys at the Ezell Clothing Com
pany, tf.
oooaooooooaooooao
O Forecast for the Week. O
G The weather bureau, in O
O Washington yesterday issued the O
W following forecast for the com- O
O ing week:
O The weather will be general- O
B ly fair the greater part of the B
B week, beginning today over the O
O East Gulf states," with tempera-O
O tures above the normal. Rains O
A are probuLie ier tL fcnJ of Um O
O week. O
00000000000000000
iVYMiitltlill Si
-Photo by Hoffmeisfter.
HOGG.
in the National Army, is
at the First Methodist church hi
daily at 10 a. m. and 7:30 p. m. Thiv
3 oclock for men only.
Camp Pike, but expects to remain
ANNUAL REUNION
STARTS TOMORROW
VETERANS AND. SONS OF
VETERANS OF STATE TO
MEET AT VICKSBURG.
The Confederate Veterans and
Sons of Veterans of Mississippi are
to meet in annual reunion at Vicks
burg thi week, and many Columbians
will attend the meeting. Prominent
among those in attendance will be
Maj. B. A. Lincoln, commander of the
Sons of Veterans, and among others
who contemplate making the trip are
uen, E. T. Sykes, Dr. H. Osborne,
Mr. J. 0. Canfield and others.
. The local party will eave for Vicks-
burg today, and will be accompanied
by Miss Katherine McKiniey, who is
one of the charming members of Maj.
Linf.bln's sponsorial stafT.
The reunion will be followed by a
great "Feace Jubilee," which will be
participated in by veterans of both
the Union and Confederate armies.
The Federal government has appro
priated $50,000 to defray the ex
penses' of this meeting, and it is ex
pected to be one of the largest
gatherings that ever assembled in the
state.
WHITE SOX WIN
FIFTH OF SERIES
GAME PLAYED YESTERDAY RE
SULTED 8 TO 5 IN FAVOR
OF CHICAGO.
With the score 5 to 5 in the seventh
inning, three runs in the eighth won
the fifth game of the series for the
White Sox in the world's champion
ship conterest played in Chicago yes
terday afternoon. This makes the
third game won by the White Sox.
and the Giants have taken two. The
sixth game of the series will be play
ed in New York Monday.
Batteries yesterday were: Sallee
and Rariden for New York, and Rus
sell and Schalk for Chicago.
A Quiet Marriage.
A quiet marriage was solemnized
about 5:30 o'clock Friday afternoon,
when Miss Florence Hunter and Mr.
P. G. Hogan were married by Justice
of the Peace T. M. Cummings. The
couple left Friday night for Meridian,
where they will spend several days,
before returning to the city.
The bride is the pretty and aUrar
tive daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. C.
Hunter. The groom, who is well
known here, holds a responsible posi
tion at the commissary of the Colum
bus Lumber Company.
Chicken Thief Caught.
Hardy DeLoach, a negro, was ar
rested the past week by local officers
on a charge of stealing chickens and
turkeys. He was given a hearing be
fore the conservator of the peace.
Mayor D. S. McClanahan and upon
being found guilty was sentenced to
pay a fine of $25 and costs and 1)0
days. DeLoach recently visited the
pi. of lilt. G. F. CroMo, two itiiles
east of Columbus, and stole two tur
keys and several chickens.
r UKCEFUL APPEAL IS
MADE TO LOCAL
CAPITALISTS.
9
$28,350 SUBSCRIBED
Committee is Determined to
Raise Lowndes County's Full
Quta of Loan.
Columbians who during noctural
hours visit the businen district to at
tend picture shows or for other pur
poses are greeted by the s'ogan:
"Buy A Bond," which blazes forth
in letters of fire from the top of a
high pole at the intersection of Main
and Market streets, and this is not
the only way in which the local com
mittee is pushing the sale of bonds
for the second Liberty Loan fund
as every legitimate effort will be
made to sell Lowndes county's quota
of the securities.
Mr. Parker Reeves, cashier of the
Merchants' and Farmers' Bank, who
is the chairman of the 1c !al commit
tee, is a hustler, and as a part of the
campaign which he and his associates
are conducting delivered a speech at
a local moving picture theater Fri
day night in which he made a strong
appeal to those in the audience to
invest their money with Uncle Sam.
The total amount of the bond issue
is $ 3,000,000,000. and of this sum
Lowndes county' quota would oe
$250,000,; but government officials
hope that the issue will be oversub
scribed, and are figuring on a total
of $5,000,000. If their hopes in this
direction are realized Lowndes coun
ty's share will be $215,000, and the
aim of the local .Committee will be to
secure this amount. . i
The following general county m
mittees have been named by Chair
man Reeves:
Publicity P. W. Maer, chairman;
Geo. O. Senter and E. L. Kuyken
dall. Fraternal T. H. Sharp, chairman;
E. R. Sherman, B. P. 0. E., D. F.
McCullough, Masons, W. H. Duncan,
Woodmen, W. A. Deale.K.of P., J.
M. Jemison, Odd Fellows, J. N.
Stuckey, Maccabees.
Tublic Speakers, "4 Minute Men"
I. L. Gaston, chairman; J. W.
Lipscomb, T. J. Locke, Jr., J. I.
Sturdivant
Churches and Schools E. C. Chap,
man, chairman; Dr. W. L. Duren, Dr.
0. B. Sears, Prof. E. A. Stanley,
Prof. J C. Meadows, Pre?. H. L. Whit
field Ladies Advisory S. B. Street, Jr.,
chairman; Mrs. J. T. Sandford, Mrs.
W. W. Durden, Mrs. Z. P. Lamlrum,
Mrs. L. H. Shapira, Mrs. H. P. King,
Miss Emma Ody Pohl and Mrs. S. B.
Street, Jr.
Detailed Information C H. Ayres,
chairman; John W. Slaughter, Willis
Pope, C. II. Reeves.
Boy Scouts W. M. Cox, chairman;
I. I. Kaufman.
Personal Solicitiation F. P.
Phillips, chairman; J. T. Sanlford.
Geo. Y. Ranks and others? to he se-
ected.
Rural Districts..
Caledonia Dr. E. M. Jemison
chairman; A. M. Lawrence, C. W.
West and Chas. Ussery.
Crawford D. P. Brooks, chair
man.
Artesia O. G. Mcllwain, chair
man.
The "Buy a Bond" hght on Main
and Market street was donated by the
Columbus Railway, Light and Power
Company. The Boy Scouts are giving
their services by placing posters in
places.' of business and .stkkers on
automobiles. The use of the bill
boards of the city has been donated
by Mr. T. F. Lamb.
Up to last night $28,350 had been
subscribed to the Liberty Loan in this
city.
Sent Sample of Mexican June Corn.
Mr Simon Loi'b, a prominent local
merchant, recently sent to H. G.
Hasting', president of the Hastings
Seed Company in Atlanta, a sample
of Mexican June Corn grown on a
plantation near Columbus, and asked
his opinion of the product.
Mr. Hastings was very much pleas
ed with the corn, and in his letter
took occasion to compliment the
farmers of Lowndes county not only
on the rapid progress which they are
making not only in diversified pro
ducts of the soil but in stock raising.
Mrs, Hunter Walker has returned
from a visit to Tibbee.
SEVERAL FIRMS ARE
AWARDED SUBSTAN
TIAL CONTRACTS.
REMODEL DWELLING
H. C Terry Selected to Over
haul the Stephen D. Lee
Homestead.
The municipal council has reftently
awarded contracts for quite a lot of
furniture and other supplies for the
new Stephen D. Lee High School,
which is now in course of construc
tion. The letting of these contract
was extensively advertised, and a
number of manufacturers and jobbers
in various cities throughout the coun
try submitted bids.
The most important '.bntract was
secured by the American Seating
Company.of Chicago, which concern
is to furnish 950 opera chairs for the
auditorium and COO desk chairs for
the study hall. E. R. Sheldon & Com
pany, also of Chicago, captured the
contract for tables to be used in the
department of physics and chemistry.
The contract for tea .tiers' chairs and
various other miscellaneous supplies
was awarded to L. B. Divelbliss, a
local merchant. E. W. Roles & Com
pany, of Chicago, are to furnish three
desks and a number of microscopes,
while lockers will be furnfhed by th
American Steel Company, of Chicago.
The contract for remodeling th
Stephen D. ' Lee homestead, wart
awarded to H. C. Terry, a local con
tra. tor, who also has the contract for
the erection of the High School. This
building is to be used as an annex to
the High School, and Mr. Terry is to
remodel it on a commission basis, te
ceiving ten per cent of the cost of
the work.
Mary Pickford in "The Little Ameri
can at Princen Monday.
Jn offering Mary Pickford, in "The
Little American" Manager Kuyken
dall feels that he is offering his pa
trons the biggest film of the year
without exception, as it has the un
usual distinction of combining a big
massive spectacular production, with
one of the foremost stars of the film
world, a combination seldom offerel.
In all the larger cities where this pro
duction has been shown, the public
have acclaimed it the very best thing
that Mary Pickford ever did, in all
her career. More money was spent
on this production than on any pre
vious Pickford film, which is saying
much.
It is a story of love and war, cf
the present time, and offers many
thrills, as well as? powerful dramatk
incidents, and it wi,'l stir the blood of
every true American.
Matinee at 3:30 and 5:00.
Night at 7:30 and 9:00.
Admission, Children 10 cents;
Adults 20 cents.
Mr. T. W. Lewis is spending sev
eral days in Oxford and Memphis on
business.
OFFICERS NAMED
BY CIVIC LEAGUE
MRS. JAKE KAUFMAN ELECTED
PRESIDENT OF ORGANIZA
TION FOR COMING YEAR.
At a meeting of the Ladies Civic
League held Friday afternoon the fol
lowing officers were elected for the
ensuing year: President, Mrs. Jake
Kaufman; Vice-President, Mrs. J, W.
Lipscomb; Secretary, Mrs. G. R. Neu
mann; Treasurer, Mrs. Louis Shapira.
Mrs. B. A. Lincoln was elected dele
gate to represent the lo"l organiza
tion at the state convention of Fed
erated Clubs which meets in Meridian
soon.
Dues for members were fixed at
fifty cents each, and a canvass of the
city will be made with the view of
increasing the membership. Mrs. L.
H. Shapira will be in charge of this
canvass.
Mrs. B. A. Lincoln was named as
committee of one to draw up resolu
tions thanking Mrs. William Baldwin
the retiring president, for the splen
did work which she has accomplished
during the several years rhirti she
has been at the head of the organization.

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