OCR Interpretation


The Columbus commercial. (Columbus, Miss.) 1893-1922, March 17, 1918, Image 1

Image and text provided by Mississippi Department of Archives and History

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87065028/1918-03-17/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

(f
VOL XXIV NO. 65.
COLUMBUS, MI3S..3UNDAY MORNING, MARCH 17, 1918.
Semi-Weekly, $3.00 Per Yf.
GARDINER WILL
SPEAK IN CITY
MONDAY NIGHT
BILL GIVING YOUNGCANDLER
PLANS OF JAPS
HOUSE PASSES
THE DAYLIGHT
SAVING BILL
WOMEN BALLOT LIED, IS CLAIM
VOTED DOWNOF MRS. HIRSH
ARE CHANGED
TO SUIT WILSON
WILL DELIVER PUBLIC AD
DRESS AT FIRST METHO
DIST HURCH.
PUBLIC IS INVITED
Back From France and Will
Tell of His Experiences
Abroad.
Sir- Phil II. Gardiner, of the East
man - Gardiner Lumber Co., of
Laurel, Miss., will address the people
of Columbus at the First Methodist
church tomorrow, Monday, 'night at
8:15 o'clock.
Mr. Gardiner has just returned
from the front in France where he
served as an Army Y. M. C. A. Sec
retary. He has very generously con
sented to a few speaking engage
ments in Mssissippi in the more im
portant points and we are sure the
people of Columbus will avail them
selves of this privilege of hearing
from the lips of a man who has actu
ally seen the front at first hand,
the story of his own personal exper
iences and observation. '-
Mr. Gardiner will not talk money
nor will any admission be charged
or collection taken. He will simply
recount his experiences.
Let the people of Columbus show
Mr. Gardiner that they appreciate
such men who make such sacrifice
as he has done and greet him with a
large and appreciative audience.
This engagement of Mr. Gardi
ner's has no connection with a re
cent announcement regarding an in
vitation which has been extended him
to speak in the interest of War Sav
ing Stamp., . -
Civ Books to Soldiers and Sailors
The Library War Service of the
American Library Association is ex
tending its work already established
in thirty-four camps, by sending
books to the men "over there."
With several hundred thousand
books in its free circulating camp
libraries and branches, it needs many
thousands more to meet the demands
being made upon it. Its fund, gen
erously given by the public last au
tumn, is being used to purchase
books which will not come to it
through iiis, and for purchasing
great quantities fo books in England
for our, troops in France, to save
transportation across the ocan.
During the week of March 18, r
preat outpouring of books from pri
vate collections will supply the books
needed to extend the humanizing
work of the Library War Service,
to the constantly increasing number
of men under arms; to furnish books
mid magazines to the sailors on naval
vessels at home and in foreign wa
ters; and to place books on trans
ports for the men going abroad.
Generous owners of private col
lections of book? are ar.ked to take
such of their volumes as they would
like to give for the. use of soldier."
and sailors to the Public Library,
marked "Library War Service."
They will be taken care of by train
ed library workers and put to work
afh once upon camp library shelves.
A big drive to get these books is
to be carried on by the library of
T. I. & C. during the week of March
IS. Books can be left at this office.
Cut out this coupon and rend it
to the I. I. and C. Library, and your
' ioks will be called for.
Hooks For Our Soldiers and Sailor-
Librarian, I. I. and C. Library:
I have . books, which I wish
to give you for the use of our Sol-1
diers and Sailors.
Name '
Address
William S. Hart at Princess Monday,
, March 18th.
William S. Hart, the noted "2 Gun
Man" of the photoplay, in a stirring,
snappy story of the old Wec
"Wolves erf the Rail," is the attrac
tion at the Princess for Monday,
March 18th. It U a story of an out
law's reformation and how he makes
ethers see the light wth his two sit
shooters, and we promise that Hart
will make you sit up and notice too
Also on the same program, we ire
offering a "Burton Holmes Trave
logue" and invite you to travel with
tV! not tTvplor st ovr the tttH
at the Princess every Monday.
Admission 5 and 15 cents.
MEASURE FAILS TO PASS
IN THE STATE
SENATE.
PLEAS ARE IN VAIN
Mrs. Isaac Reese and Miss
Kearney Plead Cause Before
The Lawmakers.
Jackson, Miss., March 1. The
Mississippi Senate Friday by a 60-50
vote, rather by a vote of 21-21, fail
ed to adopt on first reading a concur
rent resolution proposing to amend
the constitution of the state, section
241, so as to admit women to the
ballot.
This was a special order for 11
o'clock and when that hour was
reached there was a large company on
hand, including many ladies, women
frbm all parts of the state as well as
from Jackson. Prior to the taking
up of the special order a resolution
was adopted which had been offered
by the capable young senator from
Grenada, Mr. Caruthers, which in ef
fect cut off all debate on the resolu
tion by senators and simply got ,d own
fo vote.
When the time came for considera
tion, however, the special rule was
relnxed fo as to . give Mrs. Isaac
Reee, of Memphis, a visitor from
Tennessee, an opportunity to be
heard. Mrs. Reese was presented by
Lieut. Gov. Russell as a woman of
whom' any state or county might be
well proud, haying raised four stal
wart sons, all of whom are a credit
to their .rearing.
Mrs. Reese spoke fluently, easily
and- one - to the platform manner
born, in an appeal to the Mississippi
legislators to do their duty by the
women of their state, as had been
done by Arkansas, New York and
many other progressive states, It
war a movement and a change that
war bound to eomesooner or later,
and whv not now?
Following Mrs. Reese. Miss Belle
Kearney, of Madifon county Was
nre-ented and made a brief address,
after which the roll was called on the
main question: "Snail the resolu
tion be adopted?'1
Yea Adams, Bowman, Bradford,
Caruthers, Carteel, Champlin, -Coen,
Franklin, Hemphill, Johnson, Lane,
McGeljee, Middleton, Murray. Poin
dexter, Richardson. Shields. Stubble-
field, Thompson, of the Fourteenth,
Whittington and Yawn. Total, 21.
Nay Boggan, Brown, Burrow,
Christmond, Collins, Cox, Dyson,
Eskridge, Huff, Kondrick, King, Mill
r, Parks, Rtribling, Thompson, of
the Sixth, Vance, Wade, Williams, of
the Twelfth and Williams of the Thir
toenfh. Total, 21.
After disposing of this matter, and
quiet had been restored, the regular
order was resumed and the proposed
amendment to section 201 of the con
stitution, so as to change the school
ntre from five years to 21 to six years
to 19, was called up and passed its
thin! reading.
BIG ATTACK IS THOUGHT
- - , TO BE COMING NOW
Amesterdam, March 16. Field
Marshal voa Ilindonburg has de
clared that the great German offen
sive must begin, according to news
received here. The military chief of
the German armies is reported to
have stated in an interview in Ber
lin that the Teutonic offensive upon
he largest scale yet attempted must
go on, as the entente has shown an
unresponsive attitude toward Ger
many's peace intentions announced
recently.
No time was given for the start
of the long-herald attack, which is
believed to be planned for several
points on the wertern front simul
taneously, but from the news reach
ing here the interview left the im
pression that the offensive was a
matter of a very brief time now.
The Verdun offensive of the Ger
mans, in which they failed utterly to
break the French line, has been es
timated in conservative quarters as
having cost something like 500,000
men.
Mr. G. P. Ilaijvy tnJ II r. C Ik
Penley, of the A. and M. College, are
week-end visitors to the city.
DECLARES THAT SHE DID
NOT INVITE HIS
ATTENTIONS.
LAWYERS CLASH
Attorneys for Defense and
Prosecution are v Fined for
Contempt of Court.
Atlanta, Ga., March 16. Frequent
and bitter clashes between opposing
counsel marked the morning session
today in the trial of Mrs. Margaret
Jackson Hirsch, accused of attempt
ing to blackmail Mayor Asa Candler
and Judge Ben Hill twice fined
Reuben Arnold who is assisting the
state, and Judge Richard Russell,
chief of counsel for the defense.
The first fine was $5 each for con
tempt of court. A few minutes later
despite repeated warnings, the two
attorneys engaged in another heated
clash and were fined again, this time
$10 each.
Asa Candler, Jr., and Wm. T.
Candler, sons of the mayor, were the
chief witnesses Saturday morning.
The defense made a strenuous pro
test when the state attempted to
bring out that Wm. T. Candler had
'i been "pursued" by Mrs. Hirsch, ar
guing that the woman's character
had not been brought in issue and
that this was the motive of the
state's questions along this line.
A sensation was created when Wm.
Candler in the course of his testi
mony, said that Mrs. Hirsch had told
him that her husband was out of
town much of the time and had ask
ed him to come out to see her. Mrs.
Hirsch jumped to her feet anf shout
ed in the face of the witness, "You
know you lie!"
Judge Hill quickly restored order
and the testimony proceeded.
Mr. Grady Stephenson, who holds
a position with the Lucas E. Moore
Stave Company, in Savannah, Ga.,
is spending several day3 here Vith
his parents, Capt. and Mrs. D. D.
Stephenson.
The many friends of Mr. and Mrs.
T. I. Gunn regret to learn of the ill
ness of their little son "Billie."
INTERESTING TALK
ON WAR IS HEARD
SERGEANT FLAHIFF TELLS OF
PERSONAL EXPERIENCES
AT FRENCH FRONT.
Sergeant John T. FlahifT, an Amer
ican who has taken an active part in
the great world-wide war now in
progress, spoke at the Industrial In
stitute and College Friday night, and
was heard by a large audience. Ser
geant FlahifT enlisted in the Ameri
can Legion of the Canadian expe
ditionary forces and was assigned
to the famous "Princess Pat" regi
ment. On Friday night he gave a
graphic description of life in the
trenches and his address proved ex
tremely interesting to all who heard
it
Sergeant Flahiff vividly described
his enlistment, his training at a camp
in Novia Scotia, his trip across on
a transport, and finally his thrilling
experiences in "going over the top."
A wound in the lungs forced him out
of active service, but he expects to
return to the front in August with
a captain's commission.
After answering various questions
on the war, this six-foot-four soldier
urged his audience to particularly
rupport the government. "Let this
be your slogan," he concluded; "if
you can't put the 'I,' in fight put
the 'pay in patriotism."
Mrs. Allen Walton and Mrs. Gra
ham Jones are spending the day with
Mrs. C. A. Eubanks at Steens.
Mr. O. T. Meeker, of Columbus,
Ohio, was a visitor to Columbus for
several days the past week.
Mr. J. H. Reasor, of Nashville, is
spending several days in the city.
THREE HUSKY FELLOWS READY TO
HELP OUT IN THE LABOR SHORTAGE
ITEMS OF INTEREST
OVER THE COUNTRY
CIST OF THE NEWS GATHERED
HERE AND THERE AND PRE,
SENTED IN BRIEF FORM.
In spite of unsettled conditions
the total American trade with Rus
sia amounted to $438,000,000 in
1917, a decrease of only $39,000,000
as compared with 1916. This de
crease was in the trade with Asiatic
Russia and is attributed to conges
tion and import restrictions at Vlad-
vostock.
Near beer and temperance drink?
coming within ,the designation of
malt liquor are melted in the Pres
ident's proclamation limiting the
brewers of beer to 70 per cent of th?
amounts of grains and other food
materials that were used last year.
At the last meeting of the Nation
al Educational AssocIation a pro
gram was proposed to better rural
schools and asking Federal aid to
the extent of $140,000,000. The plan
would be carried in 10 years, one
tenth of the money being spent each
year, the government to co-operate
with the states and counties.
All persons or firms engaged in im
porting, manufacturing, storing, oi
distributing fertilizers or fertilizer
ngredients must secure licenses on oi
before March 20. Application must
be made to the Law Department
License Division, United States Food
Administration, Washington, D. C.
A Canadian order in council pro
vides for the free admission into
Canada of meat cattle until Feb
ruary 7, 1919, when imported by
bona fide residents of Cunada un
der regulations by the minister of
customs. Cattle, except for breed
ng purposes, are ordinary dutiabl.
at 32 1-2 cents.
RICHARDSON DELIVERS TALK
ON SAVINGS STAMPS
Hon. George Richardson, of Ma
con, Miss., delivered an address at
Franklin Academy Friday afternoon
on "Thrift and War Savings." Mr.
Richardson is one of Macon's most
successful lawyers, and among the
large number ,of Columbians who
heard his .address were many mem
bers of the local bar.
Bankers Return.
Messrs. E- C. Chapman, cashier of
the National Bank of Commerce, and
I. L. Gaston, cashier of the First
State. Bank, attended group meetings
of Mississippi bankers held the past
week in Jackson, Hattiesburg, Tupe
lo and Memphis. At the meeting in
Tupelo, Mr. Chapman presided, and
Mr. Gaston respopded to the address
of welcome.
Civic League Meeting.
There is to be a meeting of the
Civic League Wednesday afternoon
at 3 o'clock, at the Chamber of Com
merce. All committees are requested to
be present and turn in their lists of
war gardens. ,
Mr. T. J. Cady leaves the coming
week for Columbus, Ohio, where he
goes to receive instruction at the
University of Ohio, school of aero
nautics. Mr. W. D. Sanders returned to the
city Friday after a visit to Ohio.
PAT HARRISON IS
IN GREAT DEMAND
IS INVITED TO PARTICIPATE IN
WISCONSIN SENATORIAL
CAMPAIGN.
Washington, March 16. Repre
sentative Pat Harrison has been in
vited by the chairman of the nation
al Democratic committee and also by
the chairman of the Democratic con
gressional committee to deliver a
number of speeches for the Demo
cratic candidate for United States
senator in Wisconsin.
Unless he is unaviodably detained
here, Mr. Harrison will accept the
invitation, for, as he expressed it
today, he feels it his duty to help
crush LaFollettism in this great
national crisis.
Indications encourage hope for
the election of Mr. Davies, the Demo
cratic candidate, who recently re
signed from the traffic commission
to enter the race for the vacancy
in the Senate caused by the death
of Senator Husting. The issue of
Americanism is to the liking of the
Democratic candidate. Pat Harri
son is not only one of the leadin"
Democratic debaters in the House,
but his Americanism is aggressive
and unimueachable.
BYRON W. KING
TO GIVE RECITALS
WILL BEGIN WEEK'S ENGAGE
MENT AT INDUSTRIAL
COLLEGE TODAY.
Byron W. King, a well known read
er, lecturer and poet, will begin a
week's engagement at the Industrial
Institute and College this evening,
appearing under the auspices of the
Young Women's Christian Associa
tion of thai institution.
Mr. King enjoys a national reputa
tion not only as an interpreter of the
works of Shakefpeare-and other great
auothors but as a scholar and an edu
cator. He has written a number of
Poems and is founder and president
of King's School of Oratory at Pitts
burg, Pa., said to be the largest
school of speech arts in the country.
During his engagement Mr. King will
present the following program;
Sunday, March 177:30 p. m. (Un
der auspices of the Y. W. C. A.)
Subject "The Uplifted Christ," or
"The Conquered Sepulchre."
Monday, March 187 p. m. The
Science and Art of Voice with exer
cise for training.
Tuesday, March 19 7 p. m.
Words the Messengers of Speech.
Wednesday, March 207 p. m. The!
Art of Living Well; Health of Body
Had Mind.
Thursday, March 21 5 p. m.
Loving Truth and How to Reveal it.
8:30 p. m. Recital Macbeth, the
"Drama of Temptation."
Friday, March 22 8:30, p. m.
Recital Miscellaneous Selections
and Wr Party.
Cunningham to Preach.
Rev. L. A. Cunningham, of Amory,
wii be a visitor to Columbus today'
and will deliver a sermon at the
Christian church this morning at 11
o'clock. Everyone is cordially invited.
MAKE INTERVENTION PRO
GRAM SATISACTOY TO
UNITED STATES.
SEEK NO CONQUEST
Further German Advance in
Russia -Would Constitute
Grave Menace.
Washington, March 1(5. -The
United States will not abandon its
efforts to help Russia. Thtyeported
votes of the Soviets' Comrrev- to
ratify the German peace treaty does
not end the Russian siorv.
These two facts stand out as the
only solid elements tonight in rtn
eastern situation which is little short
of chaos.
There is one other element which
tonight appears to be rapidly crystal
izing. It is this:
Japan may be the agency through
which the benefioient aims of the
United States in Russia may be exer
sised. Put if Japan's armies advance into
Siberia, it is made plain, they will
do so on an entriely indifferent basis
from the proposed one, to which Pres
ident Wilson 10 days ago dissented.
She will intervene on the distinct un-
understanding that her action is.
first, for Russia s aid, and, second,
for the allied cause in general.
Japan, it is hinted in well advised
quarters here, will present to th"
United States a view of the Siberian
problem calculated amply to justify
President Wilson in approving the
movement
England, it is pointed out in the
public utterances of Arthur Balfour
and the generally expressed senti
ments of her press and diplomat.",, has
already in effect guaranteed to the
United States that Japan's motives
will be disinterested.
President Wlson, in his dissent
from the first Japanese plan, did not
raise the question of Japan's relin
quishment of the territory she pro
poses to occupy. So Japan will not in
elude any declaration on that point
in her statement in response. Pu'
the general acceptance by England
France and Italy of the principle that
Japan is not but on permanent con
quest on the Asiatic manland is
counted on to guarantee to those in
America who doubt Japan's motive?
that in the final settlement of peaet
all of the entente allies will bn firml;.
aligned against Japanese rpnilatior.
of Russia, even if Japan herself
should be inclined to carry out such
a project.
The other three principal objec
lions of the President to Japanes
action were the violation of the sov
ere'gnty of a friendly, even an allid!
nation, anil the two facts that neither
the importance of the supplies im
periled at Vladvostok and elsewher"
not the imminence of the Germur
menace would warrant such a step.
Conditions have changed on thes"
three points, according to competent
diplomatic opinion here in these re
prets.
Now Comet the Specialist.
This is certainly an age of special
Nation. Maybe that is why it is ai,
age of such unprecedented progres
The latest is the foot specialist -the
man who makes a life study o."
the human foot and of how to cor
rect and overcome the troubles tha:
it is heir to. There is a rolh'g
in Chicago, conducted by Dr. Wm
M. Scholl, the well known foe,
authority, where nothing but foo':
anatomy and the giving of foo!
comfort is taught.
The foregoing remarks are sug
gested by the announcement of
Simon Loeb & Bro's. shoe store, of
this city, that a foot specialist from
Chicago, trained personally by Di
Scholl, will be at that store from
March 28th to March 30th, to demon
strate the School Foot Comfort Ap
pliances, to examine feet and giv'
advice without charge. We predict a
busy time for him.
Opani Store.
Mr. R. W. Thweatt has opened a
confectionery business on North Mar
ket street, and will handle Bevo, and
other soft drinks, etc.
Mr. and Mrs. Gilmore, of Tus
caloosa have located in Columbus.
CLOCKS TO BE SET ONE
HOUR AHEAD ON
MARCH 31.
WILL PASS SENATE
Upper Branch of Congreia
Said to be Strongly in Favor
of Measure.
Washington, March 1(5. Clocks
all over the country will be set ahead
one hour beginning March 31, under
the so-called daylight saving bill
passed Friday by the House, 252 to
10.
Senator Calder, author of the mea
sure in the upper branch of Con
gress, said immediately he thought
the House amendments should be
agreed to so that a conference
Mould not be necessary.
The bill provides that a 2 o'clock
p. m. on the last Sunday in March
each year, clocks all over the country
which affect any operations of the
federal government or railroads,
shall be set ahead one hour. At 2
o'clock p. rn. the last Sunday in Oc
tober of each year they are to be re
tarded one hour. All business relat-
ng in any way to the federal gov
ernment will be conducted on the
time set. Further inducement for its
use by everyone i given in designat
ing the times in the various rones as
United States standard Eastern time,
United States standard Central time,
etc.
Inasmuch as commercial and labor
organizations the country over have
petitioned for the bill, Congress ex
pects a general agreement with the
taw everywhere. The Ave tones are
to be fixed my order of the Inter
state Commerce Commission. But it
is directed in the bill to .have "due
regard" for the present railroad
classifications. The unofficial under
itanding is that no important change
is to be made in the present arrange
ments. There will be Eastern, Cen
rnl, Mountain, Pacific and Alaskan
time.
Representative Dewalt, of Penn-yh-ania
said that under "daylight
wing" France had saved $10,000
000 and Great Britain $12,000,000
in fuel which would have been used
for lighting in five and a half months.
Representative Rodgers, of Massa
"huetts said the only thing the allies
nnd central powers had been able to
agree on since 1914 was daylight sav
;ng. All, he declared, had adopted
it early in the struggle. '
Members from agricultural states
lauehted at the measure.
"1 once heard," said Thomas, of
iemucKy, oi josnua oruering tne
sun to stand still three days or
hours as a war measure. That must
have been the first of the freak no
tions urged upon the people as war
measures. I used to think my state
'egislature had the foolest ideas in
the world. But it never tried to
'hange the sun in its orbit."
Wingo, of Arkansas asked why
tnother bill was not put in fixing the
freezing point at 45 degrees, so peo
ole would not feel so rtdd. Farmers,
he snid, needed no artificial clock
Mnkering to get them up.
Most of the unfavorable votes
were from farming districts.
Atwood to Speak Here.
Hon. Frederick S. Atwood, who is
delivering a series of t lectures
throughout the state under the aus
pices of the Mississippi Grand Lodjc,
Knights of Pythias, will appear in
Columbus Thursday, March 21, and
while the place for his address has
not been definitely decided upon it
will probably be delivered at the
court house here.
Fire at Collcf.
A blaze which followed the blow
ing out of an electric fuse at the
Industrial Institute and College
caused an alarm of fire to be sent
in from that institution Thursday
night. The blaze was extinguished
before the firemen arrived, however,
and there was no resultant damage.
Mr. Neilson Beard leaves this
morning for Jackson, Miss., where he
goes to accept a responsible position
with AjrTr.ovir snd Company. Mr.
Robert Betts recently went to Jack
son, where he is holding a place with
the Goodrich Tire Company.

xml | txt