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The Columbus commercial. (Columbus, Miss.) 1893-1922, September 19, 1918, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87065028/1918-09-19/ed-1/seq-1/

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VOI XXV. NO. 13.
COLUMBUS, MISS., THURSDAY MORNING, SEPTEMBER 19, 1918.
Semi-Weekly, $3.00 Per Year.
COTTON PRICES
ARE TO BE SET
PEACE OFFER
NO COTTON TO INEW DRIVE IS
Pumped Dry
OF AUSTRIA HAS
BE GINNED FOR
10-DAY PERIOD
LAUNCHED BY
BYGOVERNMENT
BEEN REJECTED
THE BRITISH
mm
-- - i . . ." . ' - i.
ni .
EXECUTIVE ORDER SOON
TO BE ISSUED BY PRES
IDENT WILSON
WILL BE 25 CENTS
This is Figure Tentatively
Agreed Upon by Govern
ment Officials.
P. M. Harding, of Vieksourg,
loueral loud administrator for Missis
sippi, bag issued an order proviuiu
thut no coiton be ginned-within ttie
borders of tue state for a period ol
ten days. The order becomes effec
tive at midnight tonight and will
remain In force until September 28
at midnight.
The order Is said to have been
isaued because cotton Beed are lay
ing up rotting, as the railroads are
so busy hauling freight for the gov
ernment that they can not spare cars
to' transport them to points where
oil mills' are located. In addition
'to this, the government officials
seera to be of the opinion that
farmers should devote their time to
picking while the weather is pro
pititious, and not be in such a hurry
to get their cotton ginnea.
A press dispatch from Vieksburg
giving the details of the order fol
lows: , . '
Beginning Thursday night at mid
night all cotton gins throughout
Mississippi will cease ginning for a
period of ten days, in compliance
with an order Issued from the office
of P. M. Harding, federal food ad
ministrator for Mississippi late today.
This was agreed upon and announce
ed at a meeting which was attended
by representative farmers, ginners
and cotton seed crushers through
out various sections of the state.
READY FOR DRIVE.
The Lowndes County, Woman's
'Coinmitqee of the Fourth Liberty
Loan drive to be launched on Sep
tember 28, has completed its or
ganization and have planned and in
tensive campaign both in volume ami
in amount. Mrs. II. F. Simrall,
whose ability and enthusiastic Inter
est has been factored in the success
of former loans, is the chairman for
the county; Mrs. F. P. PhilUps, vice
chairman; i Mrs. William Baldwin,
sales-manager; Miss Mary Eillups,
publicity manager.
A thorough canvass of the city
and county has been arranged.
BREWER KAILHOAD 81 R'.EOX.
Dr. W. C. Brewer has geen ap
pointed local surgeon for the Sou
thern Railway in Mississippi, the ap
pointment having been made by
Chief Surgeon Inge, of Mobile. Dr.
Brewer succeeds Dr. R. C. Molloy,
who recently went to Mobile to en
gage in government work.
GASOLINE OKDEK OHSEKVED.
The request of Fuel Administrator
Garfield, that owners of automobiles
refrain from using them for pleas
ure purposes on the Sabbath was
rigidly observed here last Sunday.
Trucks were used In hauling mail
and for other necessary rurposes,
but the number of joy riders was
so small as to be practically negliblo.
LEAVE HERE TODAY.
Messrs. Carrol Hackleman, Harvey
Cook and S. M. Nash, Jr., who have
been drafted, leave today for A. and
M. College, where they will begin
instruction for war work.
PIGGLY WIGCLY STORE"
OPENS SATURDAY NIGHT
Everything will be in readiness
for the big openjng of the Piggly
Wiggly store on South Market
street Saturday morning at 9
o'clock, and which will remain open
until 10 p. m. While the Piggly
Wiggly is the latest style of gro
cery business, tHe one in "this city
will make the sixty-seventh" to be.
opened in the United States.
Mr. W. E. Carothers, of Memphis,
special agent of the Piggly Wiggly
Stores, ia here supervising the open
ing of the new store, wnieh is to
be managed by Messrs. Cox, of
Starkville.
The public ia, invited to attend
the opening.
You will feel better if you keep
your War Savings pledge.
PRESIDENTISSUES STATE-
MENT THROUGH SEC- ,
RETARY LANSING
TERMS WITHHELD
Will, However, Entertain No
Offer for Mere Discussion
of Peace.
Washington, Sept, 8. TnV United
States (Govepnment's unconditional
rejection of the peace proposal by
Austria-Hungary speaks for all the
nations arrayed against the Central
Powers is the belief of officials here
today. -America's answer issued by
Secretary Lansing last night upon
authorization of President Wilson
almost immediatedly upon delivery
of the Austrain note by the Swedish
minister constitutes one of the shorf
est important notes recorded in
American diplomatic history.
iAfter stating that "the U. S. feels
that there is only one reply which
it can make to the Imperial Austro
Hungarian government," President
Wilson let forth the position of the
United States government in a
gle sentence as follows:
"It has repeatedly and with can
dor stated the terms upon which the
United States would consider peace
and can and will enter no proposal
for a conference upon a matter con
cerning which it has made its posi
tion and purpose so plain."
Prof. J. R. Vaughan, whose home
is at Steens, and who recently went
east to take up Y. M. C. A. work
abroad was rejected and has re
turned to this city. An order, was
issued allowing "no one in the draft
age to do oversea duty, unless it be
domestic service, and Prof. Vaughan
decided to return to Steens and take
Up farm work.
Mrs. Sarah Sheffield has been
named to represent the Y. M. C. A.
in the unified drive for funds for
war activities which is to be under
taken here in November.
Among the many Caledonia citi
zens who spent yesterday In Colum
bus, were Messrs. C. V. Ussery, T. J.
Smith, G. W. Myers, J. Y. Whitley
and T. L. Dowdle.
Mr. James M. Savage left the pa't
week for a visit to San Antonia, Tex.
He was accompanied as far as Mem
phis by his mother, Mrs. H. M. Sav
age.
Mrs. 0. B. Sears, who has been
spending the summer with her hus
band In Missouri, has returned to
take up her work at I. I. & 0.
Mrs. Lyda Sykes' many friends
are glad to welcome her home after
an absence of several months.
Mr. and Mrs. Ed Staub hive nam
ed their little daughter Martha Vir
ginia. Mrs. Harry Wood, of Starkville is
visiting Mr3. J. W. Jone3.
MICKIE SAYS
tp -rweas.' out of -These
JEST REMEMBER "fMt VOVJO.'
SOLDIER SONS aOT SOME
SPARE TM6 WHEN HE STS
'ROUND AND VrfONOERS
S aOH' ON BACK HONE. NVVi
DONfCHA SEND HVM THE
OLO HOME PAPER NME DON.T
CHARGE ANNTHNQ EXTRA.J
T SEND It TO FRANCE
fiinuuiiinni fflw
s
H. S. NICHOLS SHOT BY W. M. WARE
Mr. Ware, Who
mediately Gave Himself Up to Sheriff Williams
In a difficulty which took place on the Ware plantation, about eight miles northeast
of Columbus yesterday evening, Mr. W. M. Ware shot
H.S.Nichols.
According to statements
shooting, his life having been threatened by Mr. Nichols, who.was armed and who was in
the act of drawing his pistol when shot down. 1 The tragedy resulted from a dispute over
business matters, Nichols, it is
belonged to Ware and to which he had brought to Columbus to be stored. The two men
had a heated conversation -over the telephone while Mr. Nichols, who rented land from
Mr. Ware, was in Columbus,
to fight. .
Mr. Ware, who has a son
navy, came to this county a number of jears ago frcm Kentucky, and has made numer
ous friends, being generally recognized as an honorable, high-toned gentleman. Immedi
ately after the shooting he came to Columbus ar.d gave himself up to Sheriff Williams.
I Nichols had been living in
months ago from Wisconsin.
-- . : 1 '
MAER IS NAMED
COUNTY DIRECTOR
EDITOR OF COLUMBUS DIS
PATCH T6 DIRECT GENERAL
WAR WORK CAMPAIGN. ,
Hou. P. W. Maer has been nameJ
as chairman for Lowndes county for
the general war work campaign
which is to be undertaken in Novem
ber, (lie appointment Having b.eu
made by former United States Sena
tor LeRoy Percy, of Greenville, state
chairman. Mr. Maer who in editnr
of The Columbus Dispatch, ia well
known throughout both Missianippl
and Alabama, having served for
four years as collector of the port of
Monilo.
Mr. Maer has selected the follow
ing staff to assist him In the cam
paign: Treasurer, A. B. Lawrence;
director ot extension work, F. P.
Phillips; director of advertising, V.
B. lines; director of speakers, R. E.
Johnston; director of colored speak
ers, Torter Harris; director of wom
an's work, Mrs. Z. P. Landrum. Dis
trict chairman have been named as
follows: District 1, Dr. E. W. Jami
son; district 2, J. P. Woodward; dis
trict 3, Pyof. B. G. Hull; district !,
R. B. Hardy; district 5, Galus Buc'n.
SMALL FIRE AT CAFE.
Fire which broke out at about
1 o'clock Monday afternoon at
Cirh's cafe on North Market street,
caused damage amounting to about
1 $75, several hundred oyster Jpails
and other stock having been burned.
The fire made it appearance on the
econd floor of the building, and
its origin is a mystery.
Miss Marie" Cady left Monday for
f Houston, Texas, where she goes to
j twuh ia Rust school, of rhich Prof.
Richard Leigh, a former Columbian,
is principal. '
IN DISPUTE OVER BUSINESS MATTERS
Claims He Shot in
made to officers, Mr. Ware was
said, having refused to surrender receipts for cotton which
and it is said that when Nichols
!
who commands the battleship
the county only a short time,
He was about 3d years old and
' Jt-.?.rrr.
COL. J. P. MAYO i
IN NEW POSITION
RESIGNS C0MM1S$10HSHIP TO
i
ACCEPT JOB AS vjfAl ERWAYS
DISBURSING OFFICER.
Col. John P. Mayo, a former
prominent citizen of Columbus who
for the p.ist four years has been
commissioner of immigration at New
Orleans, has tendered his resigna
tion to accept a portion as disburs
ing officer of the Mississippi-War
rior Waterways Commission.
Col. Mayo during his long resi
dence was recognized as one of the
city's most progressive, patriotic
and public spirited citizens, and has
; numerous friends here who will be
interested to learn that he has un-1
I'dertaken this new and exceedingly j
I important work.
LIEUT. HARDY PROMOTED
Mr. and Mrs. R. B Hardy, of the
prairie, have received a telegram
from their wm, Lieut. Robert Hardy,
stating that he had been promoted
to first lieutenant.
Lieut. Hardy entered the camp
without previous military training
less than one year ago. Lieut Hardy,
who i3 now stationed at Columbia,
S. C, having graduated as second
lieutenant from the third officers'
training camp at Ccmp Pike, Ark.,
four months ago, has made a fine
record showing for himself a very
quick promotion.
The W. C. T. U. members are
urged to attend an important meet
ing to be held at the home of Mrs.
John R. Laws, this afternoon at 5
o'clock.
Is your vorA to Uncle Sara
... i .....
and
Back the Bys! Make good yo ir
War Savings pledge.
Self Defense Im
and almost instantly killed Mr.
entirely justifiable in the
went home he went prepared
Truxton in the United States
having come here a few
was married.
EXPRESS AGENTS
ARE TRANSFERRED
JOYNER GOES TO JACKSON,
TENN., AND BROOME COMES
HERE FROM MACON MISS.
Mr. J. W. Joyner, who for a nui i
ber of years past has been agent
the Southern Express Company In
this city, has been transferred to
Jackson, Tenn., and Is to be succeed
ed by Mr. James Broome, now agent
at Macon, Mis.
The rompauy, like all other
similar corporations, Is under ledeial
control, and the change wua maur
by direction of government otflcialM.
Mr. Joyner has made a most effi
cient agent and deserves his pro
motion. Mr. Broome, hiu successor.
Is well and favorably known her",
having served for sometime as cash
ier of tho local office before being
transferred Ut Macon.
Miss Anna Barringer's .friends in
Columbus will regret to hear that
Bhe will not return to the I. I. & c.
this winter but will be la Wash
ington doing government work.
Mrs. Will Ilamner and little
daughter, Harriett, will leav tomor
row for their home In Greenwood,
after a lovely visit to Mrs. Hamner's
mother, Mrs. A. T. Sale.
Mrs. John Ethridge and children
left Monday for Meridian, where they
were met by Mr. Ethrldge, and they
will leave this week for their homo
In Jacksonville, Texas.
Miss Reita Craddock left the past
week for Lake Charles, Lo Mr;'.
Craddock will join ber later and
they will keep house ' there.
Vr. G M. F!'n lft Mcdtiy tnw
Washington. D. C, to attend the
Lumber Convention.
ORDER ISSUED BY STATE
FOOD ADMINISTRATOR
P. G. HARDING
EFFECTIVE TONIGHT
All Gins Must Stop at Mid
night and Not Resume Op
erations Until Sept. 28th.
A presg dispatch sent out from
Washington Tuesday states that the
Federal government will soon fix the
pi ice of cotton, and that the pvlre
agreed upon is 25 cents per pound.
witli a possible Increase to 28 cent
later. The present market price of
the staple Is 33 cents.
For some time past pressure has
been brought to bear on the govern
ment to have the price of cotton
fixed. Tho movement, however, was
stubbornly opposed by Southern
senators and congressmen, and it
was thought for a while that this
oppoHltion would prove effective:
but the Western representatives be
came too Insistent. They contended
that as the government had fivnl
the pile of wheat the same pollcv
should be adopted with regard to
cotton, and the government seems to
have finally reached this conclusion
WOMEN IHUXO THEIR P.HT.
WASHINGTON, Sept. 18 Women
by the thousands are responding to
the appeal of employers to take the
places of men entering the army and
to fill new positions created by In
dustrial expansion, according to the
monthly review of the federal re
serve board. From all parts of the
country come reports that women
are helnlnc in factories, offices,
stores, warehouses, street tars and
on the farms where harvesting creat
ed an Immense demand for workers.
The rate of increase of women's em
ployment now Is much greater than
two months ago. and some Indica
tions are that in a few more month
a number of men withdrawing for
military service.
The review aa made public today
shows that women are spending more
of their new earnings for clothing
Retail dealers In alf cities where
many women recently have left their
homes to work elsewhere report
booming buslneH!. This Is contrary
to the policies of economy and self-
denial urged by all government
agencies as a war measure.
Owing to recent government f'P
ervision of employment agencies,
Industries now report much morr
stable labor conditions, but a con
tinued excess of demand for more
workers than can be supplNl. Many
anticipate a shortage this monto
with the return to school of thou
ands of teachers and children whe
have been working during the sum
mer.
AGED LADY DIES.
Death came suddenly yesterday
afternoon at 2:30 o'clock to Mrs.
Alice Mims, of Tampa,Fla., who was
her visiting her daughter. Mrs. S.
J. -McConnell, on College and -Ninth
streets. Mrs. Mims was taken ill
late Tuesday night an I gradually
grew worse until the end came.
Mrs. Mims, who vaa i t.obie
Christian woman, was known by
many people in this county who join
the Commerciarin extending sympa
thy to her two daughter and one
son.
The funeral will probably be held
at Crawford today.
TOM EVAXS PWMtTEl.
The many friends of First Lieut.
Tom Evans, son of Mr. fnd Mrs.
W. Q. Evans, of the prairie, join the
Commercial in extending congratula
tions to him upon being promoter,
to a captaincy. Captain Evau? for
some time past has been Katlonel
at Camp Travis, Texas, but he win
probably be transferred to some
other camp at an early date.
Prof T F. McBeath has received
a messase from his son, Mr. Thomas
McBeath. stating that he has be-n
promoted to sargeant first class. Sar
geant McBeath is now stationed at
Carothers Field, near Fort Worth,
Tex.
Mrs.' 0. M. Cox and Mr. E. P.
Y"S'.22P3 !?8v wek for Louis
ville, Kentucky, to visit F.sv. and
Mrs. Dunbar Ogden.
DIRECTED TOWARDS HUN
POSITIONS NORTHWEST
OF ST. QUENTiN
METZ THREATENED
Americans Make Appreciable
Advance and Gain New. J
Strategic Positions.
With the Allied Forces in
France, Sept. 18. With the
Americans smashing forward
south of M?tz, the French ad
vancing north of the Aisne
river, and the allied forces
plunging ahead on the Balkan
front, the British struck a
brand new blow northwest of
St. Quentin today.
The new British assault fol
lowed a successful blow on
Tuesday which put Holnon
village in their possession.
Holnon is only two and a half
miles from St. Quentin.
The Americans have taken
and passed Vcndieres on the
Moselle and were almost in
Pagny-sur-Moselle at last re
ports. Pagny-sur-Moselle is about
10 miles southwest of the
great German fortress of
Metz, but is much closer to
the double chain of defensive
works surrounding the city.
The French after a series of
brilliant attacks have now
gained a foothold on the
western end of the Chemin-des-dames,
the road which
lies upon the strategic line of
hills just north of the Aisne
river.
' KH.rrUML HOPES"
IN TWO (.RAVES
Montlcello, Miss., Sept. 18. Two
graves, purporting to contain the po
litical hopes of Governor Theodore
Bilbo and Senator Vardamaa, were
found on the court house square Sun
iiay atorniug. The following in
scriptions were placed at the head of
these graves:
"At Rest" over that of Governor
Bilbo, and "Mr. Too, Uiliie" over
that of Senator Vardaman.
The funeral party was composed ,
of unidentified persons.
The many friends of Captain John
R. Dlnsrnore (Personnel Officer) of
the 3I"th Infantry, 87th Div., will
be Interested in knowing that he luu
landed safely over sea. Captain
Dinsmore was practicing law in Ma
con when diplomatic relation with
Germany were severed. He attend
ed the first Officers Training camp
at Ixigun H. Roots and was comuils--doncd
as Captain there. Later he
was promoted to Personnel Officer.
Mrs. Dlnsrnore who is pleas tntly re
membered here as Miss Avery, a
graduate of 1917 class of I. 1. & C,
will reside in Memphis with her mo
ther during the absence of the cap
tain.
PAULINE FREDRICK AND 'AL
LIED WAR REVIEW AT THE
PRINCESS TODAY.
The attraction at tEe Princess for
today is an exceedingly strong pro
gram. Pauline Fredrick, in "The
Final Reckoning" is the feature at
traction, it is a big powerful mod
ern drama, the kind best suited to
the art of Miss Fredrick. ,
Also as an added feature, the
Princess will offer every Thursday
in addition to the regular program,
'The Allied War Review." . These
are official Government pictures,
and are genuine authentic scenes of
the Allied Governments. One of
these War Pitures will be shown
every Thursday.
The program for to-day should
prove a hie attraction.and no doubt
large crowds will he in attendance.
j Admission is 10 and 15 cents.

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