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The weekly Corinthian. (Corinth, Miss.) 1894-19??, November 11, 1915, Image 1

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VOLUME XX—No. 43.
CORINTH MISSISSIPPI, THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 1915.
Subscription: $1.00 Per Yew
DEA1H ENOS CAREER
OF
JV
COlllt
Saturday's Daily.
The beautiful life of Mrs. Ada
Gift, beloved wife of J. E. Gift,
passed out this morning at 5:15
o'clock at the family residence
1102 Filmore street, tracing a
deep furrow of sadness upon the
hearts of both young and old.
She has been in ill health for sev
eral months. On oç about the 1st
day of April Mrs. Gift was strick
en with an attack of paralysis at
her home in the late evening, and
never fully recovered from that
attack.
The adtfice of trained physi
cians and skilled nurses was
sought and freely given, and
though at times she was apparent
better. no permanent cure
be effected, and only tem
porary relief was secured.
On Monday, the 1st of Novem
ber, Mrs. Gift was the victim of
the second stroke of paralysis,and
since that time she lias been crit
ically ill. It was known from the
lime she was seized with the sec
ond attack that her life was grad
ually ebbing away, and the end
came peacefully this morning at
an early hour, while her form was
watched over by constant rela
tives and friends.
Mrs. Gift was one of the best
known characters in Corinth. She
was born and reared here. In
her early girlhood, in 1867, she
became a member of the Filmore
Street Presbyterian, and since
that time, up to her late illness,
she was a regular attendant upon
each service at that church, and
delighted to worship within its
walls, in spirit and in truth was
she ever faithful to all manner of
services so long as her health
would permit.
Her zeal and efficiency made
her prominent in all auxiliary
work of the Presbyterian faith
She gave freely of her time and
means to every phase of church
work. Since her marriage she has
been in some official capacity of
the Filmore Stre et Presbyterian
church or Sunday school. She
held a life membership in the La
dies' General Assembly's Mission
ary organization of the Cumber
land Presbyterian and American
Presbyterian churches. She was
conspicuous in church work for
her devotion among people, the
sick and poor. This marked her
work, and her life was sweet to
all and a benediction to those
who came under her enobling in
fluence.
Mrs. Gift served as secretary of
the Ladies Presbyterial of the
Presbytery of Bell, also she was
secretary of the Ladies Synodical
Auxiliary of the Synod of Missis
sippi, having presided in this ea
pacity for fifteen years or more.
She was well known in Presbyte
rial circles throughout this state.
Deceased was about 65 years
old.
She is survived by her husband
and one son, E. F. Waits, of this
city. .
Funeral services will be con
ducted on Sunday afternoon at
2:30 o'clock from the residence,
with her pastor, Rev. J. Hardin
Mallard officiating. Interment in
Henry Cemetery.
The following are the pall bear
ers : IL M. Stone. H. M. McAmis,
W. F. Elgin, M. W. Young. E. S.
Hensley and T. H. Johnston.
DELEGATES LEAVE FOR
STATE CONVENTION
Mrs. Julia Candler-Swift a del
egate from the W. M. U.. and Miss
Irene Whitten, of the Y. W. A.,
of the First Baptist church, left
this morning for Hattiesburg to
attend the State Baptist Conven
tion. _
ESTRAYED or STOLEN
One black milch cow, from my
home, five miles north of Burns
ville. Any information will be re
warded. k. C. GANN.
up
or
of
18
to
2,
is
_ R. EDWARDS
Xm til Tlroat Specialist
of Union City. Tenn., ha* opened
PERMANENT OFFICES in
wam.vm

,?*!•
Ü i
HOW PENSION MONEY
DISTRIBUTED IN STAIE
Chancery Clerk O. M. Hinton
announces that the pension war
wants are ready for distribution,
and all those who care to do so,
may apply at his office and take
up same.
The money with which to pay
off these warrants has not yet
arrived.
The total amount of money dis
tributed to pensioners in Alcorn
county is $5931.90. The total
amount distributed throughout
the state this fall is $449,149.90,
and is divided as follows:
A total of $37,750 among 302
veterans disabled in two arms or
two limbs, $125 each; $66,975 to
983 veterans disabled because of
the loss of one arm or one leg,
$75 each; $34,350 to 458 invalids
or totally blind widows of Con
federate veterans, $75 each ;$120,
329.80 among 3.226 veterans who
are indignent, $37.30 each; $26,
333.80 among 706 negro servants
of Confederate soldiers, $27.20
each; $163,411.30 among 4,381
widows of Confederate veterans,
$37.30 each.
This money is received and
handled by the Corinth Bank &
Trust Co./and the First National
Bank, and the pensioners will be
notified upon its arrival.
RIENZI WINS OVER CORINTH
BY SCORE OF 18 TO 13
Saturday's Daily.
Probably one of the best foot
ball games ever witnessed in this
county was played at Rienzi yes
terday afternon, when Rienzi
and Corinth met in a game.
Rienzi won the contest, score
18 to 13, and while the local team
acknowledges defeat, they ap
preciate the courtesies of the Ri
enzi team. Th'osfc who witnessed
the game say it was one of the
b^st ever piayed by these two
teams.
SHERIFF MADDEN MAKES
MOST FLATTERING BOND
AS COUNTY OFFICIAL
\V. L. Madden, sheriff-elect of
Alcorn county, who was elected
to this office at the general elec
tion held on Tuesday, November
2, has made one of the most flat
tering bonds ever made by an of
ficial of this county.
The bond required in this office
is $35,000, $10,000 as sheriff and
$25,000 as tax collector. The to
tal amount of bond made by Mr.
Madden is $70,100, over $15,000
as sheriff and the remainder for
tax collector.
The bond was made by individ
uals, friends and supporters of
the future sheriff, which is a wor
thy attest of the high esteem and
confidence in which he is held
throughout the county.
Sheriff-elect Madden will take
the oath of office on the first Mon
day in January, when he assumes
entire charge of the position of
sheriff, when his deputy, clerks,
and other members of his official
staff will be named by him.
AMOS HARDIN AND MISS
MACKIE MILLS MARRIED
A quiet wedding was solemn
ized on Sunday afternoon, when
Amos Hardin and Miss Maekie
Mills, two prominent young peo
ple residing about four miles
northeast of Corinth, were united
marriage. The ceremonies
were attended only by a few in
timate friends of the contracting
parties. Esq. Eugene Babb pro
nounced the service, which united
the young couple, who were met
with the heartiest congratulations
and good wishes of their numer
ous friends.
The groom is a son of Dan Har
din, and his bride is a daughter
of J. M. Mills, two of the coun
ty's most prominent families. *
Clay McClamroch, who recently
sold his home to Mrs. Zeb String
fellow, has purchased the home
of R. M. Bridges in West, Corinth,
and he and family are moving to
day to, their new residence. Mr.
Bridges and family are moving to
the C. M. Payne property.
, —
Weekly Corinthian $1.00 a year,
mm
K
DEFICIT Of 2 MILLION
Monday's Daily.
The government ginners' report
issued this morning, caused a de
cline in the future market. The
report shows that the total num
ber of bales of cotton ginned up
to November 1, amounted to 7,
384.000, against 9,777,000 in 1914,
a decrease of 2,393,000 bales.
Local buyers are quoting prices
today, ranging from 10.50 to
11 1-8 cents.
The report issued this morning
showed that "Ole Miss" had gin
ned up to Nov. 1, 584,069 bales,
and during the same period from
Oct. 18 to Nov. 1, 674,000 bales
The total number of cotton re
ceipts up until Saturday night,
shows an increase of 1,500 bales
this year over that of last year up
to tiie same period, the number
this year being 16,373 bales, ac
cording to the report of the Gulf
Compiess Co.
The price of cotton seed is ad
vanced $2 per ton today, the
highest price being reached is that
of $36.00.
a
of
TAG 1
COURT SQUARE SUGGESTED jj
Tag day for Corinth. An occa
sion of this kind has been sug-j
gested by city authorities for the |
benefit of court square improve- j
It has been thought a very good
suggestion to put on Tag Day, by
which this fund would no doubt
be increased. The board of su-j
pervisors, we understand, has j
agreed to donate to the fund if j
the city will donate, and every
body tliat get witliin reach of ;'
those having the day in charge on
Tag Day will be tagged, which
of
will call for a coin in the court
square improvement fund.
DON'T OVERLOOK
that subscription. If you
are in arrears remember
that we can always find
good use for
THE MONEY
LIEUT.-GOV. BILBO HAS
NOT BEEN HEARD FROM
*
Secretary Lively stated this
morning that nothing had been
heard from Lieut- Gov.Bilbo, who
had been invited by the B. M. C,
to visit Corinth on Trade Day,
which date will be made accord
ing to reply to this invitation.
Governor elect Bilbo has been
invited to Corinth on either the
15, 16 or 17 of November if pos
sible, or if not convenient for him
on either of these dates it would
he satisfactory with the Club to
have him name a date, and as vet
nothing has been heard from him.
FARM EXPERT VISITS CITY.
Geo. W. Powell, representing
the B. M. C., of Memphis, was in
the city Saturday afternoon, in
the interest of the "More Profit
able Farming Campaign," to be
held in Alcorn county on Thurs- j
day, November 18.
It was announced in a letter re
ceived by Secy. Lively of the lo
cal B. M. C., that the meeting
would be held on the 19th, but
since the arrival of Mr. Powell,
this date has been changed to the
18th.
Alcorn county will eo-operate
in this movement, and it is plan
ned that about thirty meetings
will be held throughout the coun
ty on that date.
Mr. Powell arranged all details
while in the city, in order that the
publicity committee might get
busy.
to
to ]Mrs. Julia Candler-Swift will rep
resent j£« M - W and Miss
Irene Whitten has been named a
[delegate from the Y. W. A.
STATE BAPTISTS TO
GATHER IN HATTIESBURG
The state Baptist Convention
will meet in Hattiesburg on Wed
nesday. Rev. R. S. Gavin, pastor
First Baptist church, will attend
as a delegate from the church,
Wmsml
MANY ATTEND FUNER
AL OF MRS. J. E. GIFT
Monday's Daily.
The'last sad rites over the body
of the lamented Mrs. Ada Gift,
wife of J. E. Gift, were conducted
at the family residence Sunday
afternoon, when one of the largest
assemblies of relatives and
friends gathered there to pay res
pect to her memory.
The services were conducted in
a most pathetic and impressive
manner by the pastor of the de
ceased, Rev. J. Hardin Mallard,
of the Filmore St. Presbyterian
church, and a lovely tribute was
paid to her, comforting words
were expressed tenderly to the
sorrowing relatives and friends
surviving her, and the loveliest
and most select collection of flow
ers ever seen at a service of this
nature, was placed around the
body, as a token of the truest
friendship and kindliest remem
brances that could be paid her.
Rev. Jas. II .Felts, pastor First
Methodist church, assisted in the
service in offering a prayer, and
special music had been arranged
by the Filmore St. Presbyterian
choir, which rendered softly and
beautifully the favorite hymns of
1 The body was laid to rest in
jj enr y Cemetery, with the follow
ing serving as pall bearers: H. M.
Stone, II. M. McAmis, W. F. El
| gin, M. W. Young, E. S. Hensley
j and Hon. Thos. II. Johnston.
COUNTY SCHOOLS OPENED
TODAY WITH INCREASED
ATTENDANCE REPORTED
j Monday's Daily.
j . over . , .„ ,
there is a great interest manifest
;' ^ ,n educational lilies. T ie ru
\™\ schools are opening with rec
ord breaking enrollments,
Alcorn county today
and
never inffoi e iii the history t>f ■Al
corn county schools, has there
been such a great display of en
thusiasm and awakening along ed
ucational interests.
There ai'e about sixty schools
that opened today, with the aver
age number of teachers from one
to five being employed, and ev
erywhere shows an increased at
tendance over previous years.
1
a
?
at
1
A COMPARISON OF FACTS
j
a
If a farmer raised 1,000 bush
els of corn and sold it for $1
a bushel on a year's time ,his
brother farmers would not
think he had made a very
good trade, because corn is
not sold that way.
Could you, then, as readers
of The Corinthian, expect a
publisher to produce more
than 1,700 papers 52 times a
year and sell same to that
number of subscribers at $1
a year and wait twelve long
months for his pay?
There are a number of our
subscribers to whom our len
iency has seemingly proven
unprofitable to us, and until
otherwise convinced, we be
lieve a "hint to the wise" is
all that is necessary to wipe
the deficiency off our books.
We respectfully call this to
the minds of our readers who
have permitted their paper
to get in arrears. The amount
is not such that it becomes
burdensome on your part,
but in the aggregate is a con
siderable sum to us. Kindly
give the matter your early at
tention, and if not convenient
to call in person, drop us a
line, enclosing $1.00 or more
and same will be properly
credited. You surely do not
want to be deprived of the
weekly visits of The Corinth
ian, and we assure yon we do
not want to cause same to
cease.
KLYCE & BISHOP,
Editors and Proprietors.
WANTED
Reliable family wanted to cul
tivate fifty acres on halves and
furnish himself.
LESLIE MORRISON.
M
CULMINATION OF 6IP
POTTS ROMANCE
Tuesday's Daily.
An impressively beautiful wed
ding took place last evening at
8 o'clock, when Miss Susie E.
Potts and James W. Gibson were
quietly .married, Rev. James H.
Felts, pastor of the First Metho
dist church, officiating.
The wedding was a very quiet
affair, and was attended only by
immediate relatives. The cere
mony was solemnized in the love
ly home of Rev. and Mrs. James
H. Felts.
The bride is a daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Joe Potts, and was
gowned, in a becoming tailored
suit of blue cloth, with hat and
other accessories to match. She
îas spent the greater portion of
1 er life in Corinth, and has nu
merous friends and admirers in
this community.
The groom is originally from
Okolona. He has been in Corinth
or the past several months, and is
now connected with the H. E.
Walker Drug Co., as prescription
clerk, and is very popular among
a host of friends.
Mr. and Mrs. Gibson are tender
ed the very best wishes and con
gratulations of their many friends
? or a happy and joyous future
ife.
They are occupying apartments
at the home of Mr. and Mrs. R. D.
lyneman, on Jackson street.
ARRANGEMENTS PERFECT
ED FOR MORE PROFITA
BLE FARMING CAMPAIGN
Geo. W. Powell, representing
1 he B. M. C., of Memphis, who has
been spending the past few days
n Corinth, has perfected arrange
ments with the local B. M. C. for
holding the More Profitable
Farming Campaign in Alcorn
county.
ïïr'* -r-*- i , r -
The county has been c m ed
into ten routes, and in each route
there are from three to four
meetings included, with lunch at
noon at each day's meeting, at
some convenient place.
At each place where these meet
ings will be held,-a citizen of that
community has been made chair
man to preside at the meeting.
There will be thirty-four meet
ings to be held in this county on
Thursday, Nov. 18, and some of
the most prominent experts in
agriculture will he present to de
liver addressess at these meet
ings.
Committees from the local club
have been appointed, and will
take charge of the local affairs
pertaining to these meetings, a
schedule of which will appear in
The Weekly Corinthian of this
week.
The purpose of this campaign
is to increase the prosperity of
farmers in the territory in which
the work is to be carried on. Spe
cial attention will be given in
each territory to peculiar condi
tions affecting the growing of
crops or the production of any
particular agricultural output.
Experts who have given years
to the solution of these problems
will lecture and demonstrate on
all topics vital to the success and
happiness of rural dwellers. Ev
ery branch of both agricultural
activity will receive attention at
the hands of competent men. Not
only crop raising, dairying, beef
production, tick eradication, silos,
etc., but also social and home
economies problems and domestic
betterment will be discussed by
men and women who know'.
Women speakers on questions
relating especially to the work
of women on the farm, sanitation
and general improvement of do
mestic matters in the average
farm house are to address meet
ings of women.
CHICHESTER.SPm
LÜImI AtkTMrBnnktror A
Chl-ckaa-tora M*mmm dBru.4/A\
Pilla la Red and (fold metallic \V7
bous, sealed with Blue Htbboa.A^f
yean known as Best, Safest, Always Reliable
SOLD BY DRUG6ISTS EVERYWHERE
passws wan % mw.
The wont caaea.no matter of how long ataading,
ere cored by the wenderfnl, old tellable Dr.
Portera Antiseptic Healing OIL It relieves
Pain and Heel« at the same time. 2Sc.S0e.li00
'-pr 'Kg
m
LOCAL WOODMEN EN
IERIAIN WITH BANOUET
Tuesday's Daily.
One of the largest meetings of
the W. O. W., was held last night
in their hall in the Liddon build
ing, when business of importance
was transacted, after which a
banquet royal was served, and a
very delightful program render
ed.
The meeting was called to or
der by the Consul Commander,
Willis Mathis, who presided dur
ing the business session, after
which Hon. Thos. H. Johnston,
toastmaster, took charge, and an
nounced the speakers of the even
ing.
State Manager II. F. Sim rail, of
Columbus, was one of them, who
delivered a splendid talk to the
lodge, explaining the details of
the business that was entered into
at the meeting. He was followed
by Hon. I E.^S. Candler, Head Ad
visor of the State W. O. W., who
delivered one of the best and most
enjoyable addresses ever heard in
the lodge room.
Mr. Candler was followed by
Mayor Benj. R. Warriner, who
contributed in a very interesting
way to the evening's entertain
ment with an appreciated ad
dress.
Other features of the program
held the closest attention of the
many Woodmen who had assem
bled in the hall to attend the
meeting, and fully there were 250
present at this gathering.
The program committee had
spared nothing to make this meet
ing a success, and it was enjoyed
more perhaps than any meeting
held by the local lodge.
The Uniform Rank team serv
ed as the refreshment committee,
and had charge of the banquet.
The general committee was
composed of R. L. Young, Martin
Seigrist- and M. M. Ell edge, and
0 f means ever served
in the lodge concluded the meet
ing.
WEST CORINTH SCHOOL
OPENED THIS MORNING
Monday's Daily.
The West Corinth school open
ed today with Prof. J. N. Byrd of
Walnut, in charge, and Miss Pur
vis of Plunkett, assistant. The en
rollment of today is greatly in
excess of previous years, and it
is highly probable that the school
board will find it necessary to em
ploy a third teacher.
Miss Salome Nabors, who suc
cessfully taught a subscription
school in West Corinth, during the
past two months, has been men
tioned as a probable assistant, and
it is possible that her appointment
may be effected at an early date.
RIENZI ITEMS
Monday, November 8.
Mrs. H. L. Robins of Corinth,
visited home folks during the past
week.
Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Green leave
Tuesday for Hattiesburg to be
gone several days.
Let everybody remember about
the Orphanage Car that will pass
through here on the 18th of this
month. "God loveth a cheerful
giver. ' '
Corinth met Rienzi here Friday
afternoon in a football game, Ri
enzi carrying off the honors, 18 to
13.
Mrs. Lela Hodges will be here
with her class on Friday night,
(12th inst.) Her class of temper
ance girls will give us a recital.
Mrs. Hodges has been here several
times, and we know we are to re
ceive a treat. Admission 5 and 10
cents.
Miss Christine Spain of Saltillo,
spent several days here last week,
! visiting relatives,
Miss Fay Clark of Ripley, is the
guest of Mrs. Randolph Young,
and will begin her school at Way
side on the 8th.
Mrs. Marion Perry has gone to
Bethel where she will teach dur
ing the present session.
Miss Inez Roebke is visiting
friends in Corinth.
Miss Brown was here Friday,
working in the interest of the
movable school which will be held
here the third week in November.
Let everyone attend.
Reporter.
/
ms

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