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The Jones County news. (Ellisville, Miss.) 1909-1924, July 02, 1909, Image 2

Image and text provided by Mississippi Department of Archives and History

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87065069/1909-07-02/ed-1/seq-2/

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«»ÏCAI Minm&le- * *
t i«fl Ktt tc. U" It ÜZ DC. h«J c. K. o « D/^se/vt,« 0»"bt3
lnM«*nt*tn btiodred Jtveolq-MX
Ibt R»«du!ioo rtdcc!.
'Aod ftoalius biub in «Vf ry
Onrcountry's I la a ascended
A Dec taratiup bad be« 0 aiyntd
That neve us Iixkptudencc,
4io <Mt bet Sim * peupla frte.
It» war our own d«f«r.i.».r,îî.
Facb u««r since that momentous day
Naw loop on old lime afory
Hit booming of Ihr cannon Mips
Mrueluote fht glory.
Allttirouyli the fourth day of July,
With merriment and laughter, -
boys parade, while every girl
in line walks proudly after:
(hty fire off guns andr racker», till
lor want of ommuqltiori
lheuVe forced to slop-but never dies
IMflrt oftheir ombillon.
- The Churchman.
brew*
I In
YALE HEROES HONORED.
ttatua to Caaintaatwate Ttrak f Mit With the
Bfttlih.
"The fierotc defense of New llnven
hy the ntudent* of Yale College, an
■ lm,,.i forgotten page, of American
htMoty," sav* Army anil Navy Life. I
"was first thrown Into the national
Umetight by the unveiling of n
unique pleco of slntuary. Th«i group
warn designed and arul|iture,| 111 llo
«lud lo of .laines Kdwarcl Kelly. The
utiTetling tesrk place on .Inly f>. 1907.
the anniversary of the defense of
New Haven
"The statue represent » three fig
«re*, in tho con! unie of the rolh-go
tan,
of Colonial tlmo«, operating a
Jdw.e of field artillery. The stirring
MÉÈmwâ
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e
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■TATtflt TU STttniCNTH OF YAI.K
NEW
«lfwir that the statue will nomment
«u«te (Kx-orrc-d on July f>, 1779. The
British planned to cause Washington
t<> weaken hi* força* at West Point
to order to defend tho Connecticut
rosst New Haven, then a town of
1 K 0 O tnhat,Hants, was lo be tho ob
Jwct of the British attack. President
ftttlML from the steeple of Yule Col
lege. saw the Itrltish fleet preparing
to satt from West Itaven, and called
«ut the students for the defense of
tho town.
"t'nder General Garth the British
fen cod a landing, hotly opposed by
the Yale boys and the patriots, and j
jjrcH-c-edcit to plunder mid destroy.
A jpjtchod battle was toughi at the
nimtiwest corner of Broadway, and
«he defenders were eventually over
numbein
by
superior
u !.. 'eu .1
Mcmnwlille the British had landed I
J50» men at Lighthouse Point and |
advanced from the east, with the,,
intention of forming a junction with j
i In the town and crushing
II
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IX 0FJPEK OKKCK 1>A Y
îr tr w: »Ja
j
0 |)|»f»nlth>n. whlli' Hir CJr*org<« ('(tïllf'i
bom Im ni» -d th « 1 tow
«hip« In tii« harbor.
Hv this time*, ho
fro I
the
var
ever, the entire
countryside was 11
Dints gathered In
the British withdrew
Fairfield
•cl, nnd the pn
nirh uumhern Hint
ir« 11
timed
Tin- heroic tdtidmil» of Old
lefl in possession
It I« this fight,
-» of history, that the
anil
1,1 therefore
if the College town
lost in the pa
group so lientlllflllly delineated, is t
liniuurtull/.e''
A l a 11100 « I I,eg.
Of all Ho
have wa
thouaantlH of flags which
,-d over the head» of Amerl
en tin one «lundi
supreme In II« nn
Thla one I« the ling
Jon
equaled fame
of Captain John Paul
"Founder
Hie
if tho American Nnv;
" It
m,
;;
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me
It
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1 -Âi-jTiV« -i*
5L
Jl
Rclward Kelly, Sculptor,
WHO OIH'OSKD THM IIIHTISII AT
HAVEN.
was the naval hero's proud boast that
he und the (lug
been born t.
we twins, having
Hier. "As long us wo
float we Hhnll flout together," was tho
pledge which lie kept to the end. It
was fitting that the first flag t
over an American vessel was hoisted
on the Hanger by Jones himself, July
4. 177". snys nn exchange.
This lia g was made b> a qiiljtiHg
f young ladles at Portsmouth,
where the Hanger w
The thirteen white stars
were cut out from a white silk die
In which Helen Seavey had been mnr
float
party
N. II,
luiim-hcd
j r|ed to a young officer the May Ite
fore. The blue field and the red and
while Stripe's were also of silk, nnd
were furnished and made up by Mary
1.» tigdou, Caroline Chundler. Helen
Seavey. Augusta Pierce and Dorothy
I Hail, this last u nicu-e of Elijah Hall,
| second Honte nnm
j symbol of liberty t
f the Hanger, it
ns the first example of the new
be seen In Euro*
peuii waters and the first to be sa
luted by European powers in those
»"Hus. bj th, Fren.-h :ll the Qui
j This was only the beginning of its
fame. Jones took the (lag with him
j when he gave up tho Ranger and
spreud it to the sail bre-exe when ho
i Stepped i'll the quarter deck of the
Bon Homme Hlehard Hut before
j thut In- bad fought the Drake, and
this was the first naval victory gained
! by the Stars and Stripes; this flag
' was the first ever hoisted over a for
j elgn enemy after nn American vle
; tory on the seas. Fierce as the flght
! lug was that dny off the Irish coast,
I mid though it was tho first time a
: British ship of war ever struck Its
color» to an inferior force, the flag
! uum- through the battle without a
scar. This was also true of the fight
lug with the SerapU, September 13,
1 779. ihe bloodiest battle ever won
i 511
a.
When Captain Pearson struck at
last his sailors were cowed by the In
domitable valor of Jones aud his
The Scrapls was uninjured,
the Bon Homme Richard was a total
This engagement Is the only
\ men.
j wr
T one Io ihn history of the sea In which
She victor sank and th » vanquished
! floated Transferring hl* wounded
, ('attain Jone«
fmo to n?« the
liant <)<>h.<J went
An a final trlb
ArrwrU
« w« nt
to
had no more ibari
living.
Ilh
»Uh
« »hip.
lor of the hr
io»! la mou»
w n
therm.
The Fourth of July.
"O u the M or JuJy
ms. then one of th«
repr
of Ms«»«
ICtf«
In lb
f*ntm
If«*. A 1*1
r**t•* fri bl«
tho jfy
« hb h Wil*
if roll to
.lb,
•d in
d
nu-r
p
bee
-T11 a »>. , hi,
dny. lie .„Id
" 'But the
,1 letter
V ritten the s
dny li
The 2d of !
past
mmit
J
will be 111
a III t
apt to bell
billl,,l by «II,
til*
in
of Amer
eve Unit It will I,
feeding general I,
I ,
ep
it
ft
It '
ltd
rbt to hi
•«Nd »» thr ilny j
utU'inu tu
uminvti
»murr*
tion to *;«»<! Almighty,
with
it
:ht fn
(OlPtnidxi'iI
M V*rnih
ijiortn, gui)«, hi-lli
with «lu,
bonfire.
as. gnitiei
fi ri* I llli)fnlmith«!iM,
nil
Olin
'
f'ful of thi« rontliKiit ii
thi«
(hi*
lii'f. fron
, !
forwnril. for «»vi-mi-i
\Vhi*n th«* r««oliitfnn w<in f/ i k«*u up
tho Jil, 1 , H tlo- Hfû!
ttfiu*
ex.-epi Ne
■ York.
the 2 d dny I
177H. (lie Ind.'pend,-lie,- of Hie 1
v.-ted tc, Kc-cept It, Tlill*.
of July
Thirteen
throne of Grent Itriluln
t'lilted
Colonie» from Hie
k deMrdlely j
dec-lded upon. The 2d, noil not the Ith.
may he called the true dale of the I
tu vMr
NMA
4
A.

m
,v\
. N»J
THE BOSTON
could with propriety
ri-lclirnli- itn> 'FcmrUi' two day* earlier.
\v
cpat-nll,ni.
Tlml the purUi-lpunlH In the work eon !
«hh-recl llo- 2,1 n» the
Inn; date h
«h,,« u by tin- letters written b.v .lolm j
Adam«, quoted u! the beginning of Hi!»
irtlele.
The popular fancy, however.
seised upon the lilt. Ihe dale of nr |
of J(,|Ter»()li'h
Irmmitb
evptnnei
lltnre
rioolnrntto
>ii of tli«' rntKotiK for tin* nv\h I
iK t !u* propor ilny t « » colohrnto. !
nrntbu),
Tin* delmte it]>c>n the dm-utuent
«'»mtlmuil
4tli, mill,
rim mii liilot inliinbl)
wm of tho y«*nr. Butt
opprrwlvrlf
\X lllf'tl till* ih'i'llfJ fn Nilt
Ntahlf*.
ÄwnrmtHl ihlrk nriri !1»*rr
til«» Il'ATH Of tllf* «1**1«*« It
luirri tl)roiitf!i tln'lr thin
i won profornblo t«» din«*
fort,' «uni m lu n t ttu* (lelcirntoK w«*n* j
hrotiKht lo Kuril n kIii t«* of iiiitnt us to j
ngroo to tin* Ih>( ianitlon without fur
th«M* HlinMKtllHMlt.
i ut il the*
of th«*
iftoriMM'i
.i«*fr«'i!»on, inluht hnvr i
t nuy otlirr neu* 1
Hithi'r whM j
Huy»
'X
I tin* h.vtl In !
in
I« clc,
,- to II
\vliltin'
tlo»
li ii ii« ry
*. niiKhtiiitf on !
II In
i and Idling
li «to
klng'
suppose Hint the |
"It 1« a mistake t
document was signed by the delegates j
on that day. It Is Improbable that !
any signing
Hancock, the President of the Con I
gress, and ITmi-les Thomson, the See- ,
retar.v." Paul l.elund Ilmvorlh. In
Harper's Magazine for July.
as dom- save by John :
There wits great rejoicing In the»
Hnncock and many other Massitehu
setts homes when the news of tho
Declaration came, in Philadelphia
the joy was more openly expressed,
but In New York ami New England
circumstances made thone exhibition»
of «ntl» fart Inn of a secret nature In
many instaurée, Neither the British
nor their allies, the Tories, were in
aiiy mood to look with favor upon a
celebration like that. Thus our first
Independence Day was one of great,
but necessarily quiet rejoicing.
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FO« RTI1 OF JULY.
.l.-,,r ch
now let « I,
fun,
,ff lik
r. it"
'>
what 1
,
' J
off >our I
To 01
il.l
Fourth of
.lull '
Uti
tK«-r* ft fid
\vhi
V
iff
it
I >1
ihngM f<
uc!i a
And no.
I he
f,
Ii.il.
t }.D tilt
din*l y wrll.
\\h it*
John
*
11 ofi
Well. . 0,1
Will happen.
Don't .
n> îles
au,
,
•ho '**rp
go off mightv loud.
. 1 .
id down 1
VI hut ,
, 1 .
«mi h,
ling! A 1
I
Yn
Well, I 111 « eel,-hr,,
ha« l,een a
Well».
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TEA PARTY.
Tlir Theory.
The »Ingle eyeghiHH is worn by the
The theory I«
more with one eye- then he can
United Presbyterian.
,|udi-.
lull he can »,
rum
,>rc-lic-ml
The (JlorioUN Fourth.
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t;-,. y'
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¥
«y*
Shade of George Washington—
"Gadzooks! did I start this?"
The Hong Kong and Shanghai
Banking Corporation paid dividends
and bonuses aggregating thirty-four
lier cent, for 1908. The Alliance
Bank, of Simla, paid fourteen per
cent.
It is said that stliclde and boride
of titanium, products of the electric
furnace, are as hard as the diamond.
t
PööüLAß,
s&Ävce l
(CkRwTIoN
« K m j A.I«
trlcally welded chain
Recently ole
i ha« been made commercially by auto
; malically cutting the blank* from a
bar so a« to form a socket In one end
i and a <
agraphic archives, which will be dlvld
''1 ed Into three- parts, and which will
I probably be the moat remarkable Ub
; ! I arv ori record The first section will
A leading mathematician of France
I gl.c» am Hier warning lhat there Is
1 1,0 Infallible method of doubling one's I
il .. . . ... ,,, . ..., an d „..
, ... ** , . '
1: ' 1,1 commue om s piaj «
n* to have a great chance erf winning •
a Utile and a little chance of losing :
much, and many chances of losing lit- !
Antoine Henri Becquerel, the psysl
cist, blue reported before the Academy
c f Science* a irioet interestlug demon- \
Mini loll of Hie life of seeds. Submit- !
ted 10 p werfui lire destroying tests, j
,,,, , u , . u.,,,,,,, »c -, lemoernture
c.Miig H .1 '■"«"">« a empernturt (
or ...... degrees below ztr , in y r j
min ibeir germinating force, me
conclusion drawn by Mr. Becquerel Is
that lire Is not a mysterious principle,
chemical
organism produced by
ml forces of Us cosmic en- !
«ponding taper on the oth
er end < 1 ! the link blank.
The Academy of Sciences at Vienna
I ha« decided upon the creacion of phon
, tie devoted to examples of European
' J languages and dialect» of the different
poopl.-h spoken at, the beginning of the
I twentlelli century
of
fid
he
tlf*. One can arrange hl« play »o aa I
to have one chance of winning a mil
lion franca and a million chances of
luring one franc.
hut a Himplc phyairal ami
fuuctlon of an
1
S
!
Electric train lighting is more gen- ,
eral abroad than in this country, be
cause the runs are much shorter and j
the baltery system is therefore praett- :
ml there whereas In this country 1
Ihf ie are' some drawbac ks connected i
' , / , !
wifji its us», («as lias been toinm
more suited for use on the American
continent. The electrical engineers
substances
virontnent.
have been giving this matter some at- |
tentlou recently, with the result that
11 ,,. url . system ts now being seriously
experimented with try one prominent
. .. n.. „,1 J- lllin „
western railroad company, btorago
and tho lamps are so disposed of In
the dome of the car that they have the !
appearance of the familiar gaslight in-j
as much os the lights and mechanism!
j
batteries are carried beneath the cars. !
are hidden beneath a bowl-shape of
ground glass.
nw Mus drown to inriude
ow Mas crown to inccuos
Progrc s has been made in the man
CONVENIENCES IN PAINTS.
Busina. <^N
All Processes.
of points and varnish, and
he high grade quality manufactured
ufactur.
in tills country siauds second to none,
says the Detroit Free Press. An idea
of the proportions of this Industry
may be seen when it is remarked lhat
the business of several Detroit manu
facturers amounts to very large sums
...... i,
cn ', ^
blxty years ago painters giound
their own whlto lead and made their
own putty. One machine these days
turns out more putty of a better and
more even grade than all the hands
of „K -| le painters -ind carpenters
thom ' Formerlv. when painters
. .. . t .,„ K
ground llu.tr o n 10 -o s a e
and muller formed the entire appar
atm, hut now. when grinding has be
c-oine a separate industry, cfflcleut ma
chtnery has been devised for grinding
und Us collateral operations
Everything is being manufactured
, ,, , , , , , _
the old days he- hail lo ina.ee his own
When colors were first put
j up they were dealt out to him In a
1 little bladder. Thet artist would prick
i u hole iu the skin, squeeze out the re
tie up the
v ' ; : ' ,h ' : v * ip •*
The manufacture of paint has hap
1 pily become modernized and lire grada
The selling price
ruiliis involved
A curious incident in the reccn,
, r .(,, ... •„ i .... ...itK-im-iu
'' ^ ;. * ' . ' ' / *. V x x .
of rooks is mentioned b> a Londou
i correspondent.
It appears that a couple -if carrion
; crows settled in the gardens, nnd one
day it was discovered that the roik
benchers
for the consumer's use and comfort.
Formerly the carpenter had to pre
pare his own wax and his stains for
the wax floors. Today he is shown
blocks of wood al the paint store fin
ished in different styles. He can buy
materials to duplicate tne effects,
t-'o has the artist been assisted. In
canvas.
tubes
j infinitely improved.
for tha
! than ever in the history of the iudus
ts cùeaper
uy.
RookF Hatred of Crows.
I ery was deserted. The
who are particularly proud of their
j rooks, gave orders for the carrion
, crows to be destroyed, and the gard
ener prepared pigeons' eggs with
j good doses of arsenic. The crows
: swallowed them aud seemed to grow
fatter and healthier. At last strych
nine was used, and the pair were
seen picking at the egg. One of them
fell ns It flew up to the nest;
other reached the branch, reeled and
dropped.
Then a curious
tt
l.,;:ig happened,
■ n - » for week*
the next day they
j b»
Not a rook had be:
s. Gray s Inn. but
♦ere all back
telegram.—Man
cs though advise
c&ester Grardiaa.
I
f
THE PULPIT.
k BRILLIANT SUNDAY SERMON BY
THE REV. HOWARD C. IVES.
Thome: Faith of God in Mao.
y
'New York City.—The Rev. Howard
C. Ive*. pastor of All Soul s Uni
j tar | an . l ; n | Ÿ( . I . Ba n 8l church, of New
Conn., preached Sunday
. Londoni conn..
mor „ lng In All 'Soul»' Unitarian
j Church. Fourth avenue and Twen- :
tleth street, the Rev. Dr. Thomas R.
Sllcer being the preacher at Cornell
' University. Mr Ives' subiect was
I "The Faith of God In Man." The
text was In these words: "God bath
given man dominion over the earth:
and 0Tfcr eyer y living thing that tnov- r)
j «.tb upon it." In the course of bl*
sermon Mr. Ives said:
We cannot too often remind our
I reives that man's Idea or ideal of j
I God has constantly, though so slowly
as to be almost imperceptible, I
changed as the ages have rolled
: around. From a faith In God as that
of the savage; who t-usts Him to pro- :
tect him from plague, fight for him
j In battle and guide him In his hunt
I Ing, through many upward steps man
! has come to have faith in a God of
Une and Fatherhood. When to-day
the leaders of scientific and religious n
• lhought Bpeak of a f a tth In God, they
: do Ilot mean any acceptance of a
! definition of Hla attributes and fuuc
any description of His
powers or dwelling place. Both sei- j
unco and religion accept the universe :
as the developing work of a rational :
power. Every Intelligent, man to-day j
regards the universe as an unfolding,
living organism. Kvery scientist ap
proaches the study of this life with j
\ an awe and wonder exactly propor
! tioned to tho depth and sincerity of:
j his character; and every thoughtful
mind sees in it all the working out of
( , mn|uUb|e pla|1( the expression of I
j an („dwelling God, the unfolding of
m e w hlch is material or spiritual,
on )y a s It Is viewed from different : 1
sides and by different grades of In
telllgeuce. It Is only by tracing these c
slow developments of spiritual life,
°f an ap predation of the worthful-;
j
I tfon», nor
is
ness of purity, honor and truth; ofi
the constantly developing ideal of!
God, that we are able to see that to
WO rshlp an arbitrary Being, en-;
throned at the centre of the universe,
to whom prayers for selfish gratifies-!
tion may be addressed, Is just as truly
idolatry as if we were to set up a I
braïen lma S e nnd P™? to tllat - Tte '
only faith which a finite being can
p 0Bs ibiy have in an infinite God, with
out being intellectually ridiculous, is !
to accept the highest ideal of the age
in which he lives as the God worthy,
of worship. J
Now, Is It not plain that all thi» I
b . u, ' i, ; a °, r PJ\°B re ?», °, f , d ^' < ? |1 " en *- ,
of faith in himself, of faith in God,
baa been n lrown ul)on man's shoul- !
ders? This infinite God, this power!
that works for righteousness, this
eternal energy from which all things j
proceed, has literally said to men ;
through all history, "Go forth and
have dominion over the earth and 1
which
mov-j
eth upon It. Plow into tho ocean 1
with your ships; glrdlo the world !
with tha electric spark; trace the
mighty sweep of worlds and suns; j
tunnel mountains, water arid plains,
t „ ¥er(i# . * Hlr , )kc h!rd> swim
the ocean deeps like the fish, separate
in your laboratories the elements
from which I have comnot-ided the 1
Do all this and a thousand-!
fold more, for, lo! I am with you to j
guide and uphold." And men have J
done it simply because God has trust-j
ed them with the edged tools of tha!
world. I
But He has trusted us with still
How did we ever !
worlds.
greater power.
come to replace tho Idol of a
ful, vengeful God with the spiritual'
(0nceptioI1 o{ God as ( ove? simply j
through God's faith in ua as His spir« j
itual children,
time a great soul
,-rath
In the fullness of i
—the first of those.
true sons of God for whom the crca - 1
tlon batl been in travail through the
a 8 t ' 8 -, enunciated the simple, tre- !
meudous truth that all this galaxy of !
earth and sky; all the meaning of ,
History ; all the lessons of nature und
the voice In the hearts of men, con
verge toward the "tlroof tllat God s
pians Involve nothing but the ulti
mate happiness and goodness of His
f, hiUl , ren ' tha ' He !V'°' P*®" 8 ?? wlth
the death of the wicked; that He sor
rows over the prodigal and that there j
is joy in heaven over one sinner that |
repenteth. In a word, that God is
fully, completely, scientifically de- !
scribed in the words, "God is Love." ;
But this tremendous truth had al- !
ways been in the world. God did not
suddenly become a God of love. Men ;
had been slowly learning the lesson
through the sufferings consequent
upon Ignoring it, and they learned It
by experience, simply because God
trusted them to learn it and had
***** *n them. That after it was
'«"lied "»'> would turn with *<»•»»<*
\V!:en C: raw us iîï- » i-.irth to pos- '
se He also pave ns ourselves, and
trusted us to learn that the only way;
to really possess our own souls is to
prefer others before ourselves; thol®
on ^' WJ1 >' to ,>e first is tlie ser
vant of all; the only way to conquer
is to love. This is the whole message
of Christianity. We are no longer i
told we must be good in order to gain. ;
heaven after death. We have learned |
ti,a - nl " st , llve aa <* un ' I
h -'Iflshly In order to make a heaven'
here and now for our brothers; and
in ] carn j n g t h a t we have learned it
a n. We have onlv to adopt this
simple rule to the involved conditions!
of modern life: only to make it effec
live in shop and home. Senate chant
bcr ar - <1 school, in street and farm and
press, and, lo! God s age-long faith in
His children has been justified and :
His kingdom has come on earth as if !
is ia heaven.
!
-, n . . ... i
Give me. O Lord, a mild, a peace- 1
Ible, a meek, and an humble spirit,
that, remembering my own infirmi
ties, I may bear with those of oth
ers: that, considering my character, j
I may rebuke with all long-suffering i
and gravity; that I may think lowly
of myself, and not be angry when
others also think lowly of tue: that I !
111ba patient toward all men. pen-!
tie and easy to be entreated. Amen.
—Bishop Wilsoa (1722). 1
A Supplication.
UTic
5imàaq-&cftoç>[
IXTER'MnnMt l.ERSD* COM
MEATS FOR JULY 4L
Cubjerl : Paul'* Second Missionary
Journey—'Antioch to Philippi
Acts 1 7» : .*50-1 C : 15—Golden Text
Act« If»:t)— l'oiAmii Vertes 9, 10
TIMK.—A. D. 6 J. PLACE —
T f 0 as, Philippi,
EXPOSITION T .—Paul Forbidden
to |» r( . ar f, j n Asia. 6 -S. "Asia" here
r) 0 es not mean our modern Asia, nor
,,ven Asia Minor, but a part of Asia
Minor, the Roman Province of Asia,
The time for Paul to speak the Word
j n Asia had not yet come. So the
Holy Spirit said to Paul, you must
not speak the word in Asia. Thlg,
probably seemed strange to Paul, but
ne wisely obeyed and asked no ques.
Hons. If we would speak the right
word, in the right place, at the right
time, we must look to the Holy Spirit
for His guidance, and He will give It.
The time came later for Paul to speak
"tha word of the Lord Jesus" in Asia,
n iu 1 wonderful results followed (eh.
19 : 1 , g_ 10 , 26. 27). If he had dij
obeyed the Spirit and followed hla
own Inclination and judgment there
would have been no such results. But
though Paul obeyed the Spirit and
did not speak the Word In Asia, he
did no t give up preaching. As the
Spirit would not suffer him to speak
in one place, he went to another. The
Word was a fire in Paul's bone», and
lie must speak somewhere. If Paul
had been like many of 11 s. he would
have taken the Holy Spirit's prohibi
tion of his preaching in Asia as an
etcellenf warrant for taking a vaca
tion. Paul's labors In Phrygia and
Galatia at this time were greatly
blessed. There Is no description of
1 hem here, but we learn from later al
lusions to them that there were many
c inversions and a number of churches
.
*
organized 1 ii. 18:23: Gal. 3:2). It
is well to note that Paul did not need
the guidance of the Spirit to set him
to preaching, but to keep hint from it
(comp. v. 7). If It had not been for
the express prohibition of the Spirit
he would have gone to preaching in
the place nearest at hand. The Word
of God tells us to preach, and so we
need no special revelation for that
' Matt - 28:19, 20; Mk. 1C:1D). As
Blthynia was the nearest country at
hand, they immediately attempted an
entrance to conquer it for Christ. But
liPm again the Holy Spirit blocks the
way. How strange it all must havs
appeared at the lime. But God had
larger plans Tor His faithful servant,
, "' *;«'•> C«"ed to Prench In Mace.
donin, 9. 10; vs. 8-12. Step by step
, *;«'•>
donin, 9. 10; vs. 8-12. Step by step
God leads His servant eu. The means
God used for his guidance are va
riotis: the direct guidance of the Holy
Spirit, a vision (comp. c'a. 9:10-12;
10:10-17. 20; 1S:9, 10; 22:17-21;
27:23. 21; 2 Cor. 12:1-4, 7: Acts 2:
1 7). his own judgment ( v. 10. It. V.).
The promptness with which Paul re
sponded 1o the guidance of God, no
matter how it came, is worthy not
only of special note, hut of careful
imitation. This is one of the greatest
secrets not only of a happy, but an
efficient life. If we respond at once
to God's leading, ft bec omes clearer
and clearer. If we falter, the guiding
light, grows dimmer until it goes out
in thick darkness, and we arc left to
grope our way as best v.e can. "Come
over into Macedonia and help us.'"
What! nn outcast, wandering Jew
help proud and potent Macedonians,
especially peonle of the distinguished
colony at Philippi? Yes. for he wa*
* ! >e bearer of that In which alone Is
When
.
Paul Ma^ < ba l try b ® knew it was
the preaching of the Gospel that was
called for (v. 10).
help for man—the Gospel.
*
III. The First Convert in Europe,
11-15. Paul lost no time in starting
for the fieCd to which the Lord had
called 1 i1m. There had been no su
pernatural direction as to what part
of Macedonia he was to begin at. So
Paul used his common sense and went
straight for the it'st city of the dis
trict (R. V.). Fa\,5 and his compan
Ions did r.ot begin breaching at once
<v. 12. H. V.). They waited and
watched, and doubtless prayed for a
« aV ? r tï le U " e and p i ace „ t0 strl ke.' b e
first blow (comp. cb. 13:14: 17:2;:
18:4).
quiet and humble way. They did irot
advertise largely and get a great
crowd into the largest public build
tng. They just spoke to an obscure
but earnest company of praying worn*
en. Some one has said the "man of
Macedonia" turned out to be
an : It may have been the Philippian
Jailer. Be that as it may, the work of
European evangelization began with
a handful of praying women. That
'was one of (he most notable gather
* n S a of ••'** history. The word spoken
r*!"l ,€< Ud th *tÜ?« VC - i0n ° f a , pr 2 S
J
v as ' ; «riiine: j • in:. Thera In no
kope fo" any woman, or man either*
unless ^th* Lord opens their heart
^ ,înr ^ 45; Epli. 1:17, IS; Lu ko
8 ^^^). But this He Is more than
to d°- The steps in Lydia'j
conversion are very plainly marked
an< * typical. (1 ) She went out to
P*' ay *3). (2) She heard tho
,V? r i/ vs * 14 • °otnp. .Tno. 5:24)^
The Lord opened her heart. (4)
* he ,. t, '* n Ss which
we.espoka (v. 14 R. V.). ( a > she
J^s^bartired (v. 15; comp. ch. 2:41;
Xlpr - i l- lff). Lydia carried her
*' Uo,e household with her (vs. 31.
3 "; } Cor - 1:1B) - Lydia's heart went
Î ,' 1 *. *P gratitude tnward tho-e whom
00(1 ba ? Uf8d as instruments in her
^ onvers '- r ' n and she constrained them
Î2 cciu ® int0 b? ' b °usa and abide
"' ?r *
They began at last, in a very
a worn
To Find Peace.
Give me good work to do, that X
may forget myself and find peace in
doing it for Thee.
Though I am
Poor, send me to carry some gift to
those who are poorer, some cheer to
those who are more lonely_Henry
Van Dyke,
God's Habitation.
. .
p-.-nd'free from it* In t * m "i®, u *
" i-angTLd operations ÎT?£2 ?Vk'
GoJ / bab *
. le Ipuysbrok e a3 ' J , " lu *
!e ' Ka y»*»®*e.

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