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Greenwood daily commonwealth. (Greenwood, Miss.) 1919-1926, November 15, 1919, Image 1

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MISSISSIPPI'S LIVE
BIG. NEWSPAPER.

J. L. & S GILLESPIE, Editors and Publishers
PUBLISHED EV:
AFTERNOON EXCEPT SUNDAY
ASSOCIATED PRESS NEWS SERVICE
GREENWOOD, LEFLORE COUNTY, MISSISSIPPI, SATURDAY AFTERNOON, NOVEMBER 15, 1919
VOLUME 4—NUMBER 66
SUBSCRIPTION:
SINGLE Cp PER MONTH SOe
COPY VC PER YEAR <6.00
&
SWEPT BY A NEW
WAVE OF TYPHUS
X
Which Reached Greater Proportions-Is
Than Ever Before In Galicia At
This Time Of Year.
Associated Press
LEMBERG, Nov. 15—Galicia has
been swept within a few weeks by a
of typhus which reached

new wave
greater proportions than ever before
ta this time of the year, say Ded Cross
reports. Hundreds of people have
been stricken and died without medi
cal attention in villages that could not
be reached by doctors.
After more than five years of con
the country is al
tinued warring,
most without the elemental hospital
It has been the battle
necssities.
ground of one army after another and
the zone for changing forces of
oc
burned
cupation. Large areas
The best equipped hospitals
are
away.
have been completely ruined and pil
laged.
Lieutenant-Colonel
Halban .Chief Sanitarian of the Polish
for the Galician front,
According to
government
the typhus situation eclipses anything
ever known in this land where typhus
has always been more or less epi
With an unprecedented be
ginning in the summer months, it is
feared the winter will see it increase
demie.
The vermin
with even greater fury,
which causes typhus incubate and mul
tiply in the cold season.
The American Red Cross has estab
lished a headquarters here, in respon
se to the appeals of the military and
government authorities Intense ac
tivity is already in progress for cop
with the distressing conditons.
Requests for hospital supplies
into the temporary headquarters
have been
ing
eome

from all sides. Centers
selected for vitally needed hospitals,
but there is such an utter lack of ma- 1
terial for equipping them all efforts
to cope with the situation have failed.
The military and government auth
orities are lending every possible aid
in hastening the immediate distri
bution of the American médita sup
plies in an attempt to check t e c is
ease before it gains too much head
way.
-o
THE NATION THAT
SMOKES PERISHES
/
\ i
I
!
NEWCASTLE-ON-TYNE, ENG.,
Nov. 15_"The nation htat smokes
'perishes," declares R. P. Moncrieff,
honorary statistician to the British
Anti-Tobacco and Anti-Narcotic Lea
Declares R. P- Moncrieff. Honorary
Statistician To British Anti-Tobacco
And Anti-Narcotic League
Associated Press
gue of Manchester.
In the year 1917, he says the British
people smoked 152,215,700 pounds of
tobacco .costing the smokers approxi
mately $497,690,000. Pipes and othe
»appliances came to $22,684 000 mai
ling a total for the year of more than
S$520,000,000.
\ The following year the amount in
Cjreased to 164,838,800 pounds smoked
Valued at $668,765,500 with pipes and
appliances costing $23,309,o00.
r !From these figures it would appear
that the consumption of tobacco in
1918 increased over 1917 by 12,623,- j
100 pounds, or 8.29 percent, while
the extra cost was $171,074,500, or
34.37 percent. The total expenditure j
tor the two years was $1,212,450,000
a fugure which leads Mr. Moncrieff
\o exclaim:
\ "Has the nation gone mad over
tobacco?'' He continued:
• «if the women of the nation become
habitual smokers as they are rapidly!
doing—what effect will it have on
the future generation ? The query is
answered by the late Sir W. B. Rich
ardson as follows: 'If a community of
youths of both sexes, whose progeni
W ere finely formed and powerful
to be trained to the early prac
Were
>ice of smoking and if marriage were
fatfo be confined to the smokers, an ap
parently rew and a physicially inferi
YT race of men and women would be
t »
V ifr. Mcntcreiff calls on the medi
al profession to face "this formida
ble danger to the nation and warn
boroen especially as to the injurions,
effects of tobacco smoking:"
. ... . . - -o
joes accident or minor troubles
poor tires, Call "Seven Eleven
torn the nearest telephone, WeTl
» rest. 711 Tire ft Accessory
99
tnt one of the very bait
ie for less than
Big Six Stade
-o
-
Go., can
... * -
THE NEW NATIONAL
COSTUME FOR MEN
Ready To Be Placed On The Mar
ket—First Allotment Composed
Of 25.000 Suits.
;
Associated Press
France, Nov. 15—The
national costume" for men is
ROUBAIX,
new
ready to be placed on the market. The
first lot is composed of 25,000 suits,
francs, as compared with 400 to 500
francs now charged by tailors. The
profit of the tailor on the new "nat- ;
ional costume" is fixed at 10 francs
The cloth is of cotton warp
110
The price has been fixed at
a suit.
with woolen filling and will range in
color from navy blue to light grey,
black, olive drab, dark and light green,
Although perhaps not adapted to the
needs of the professional boulevardier,
the new costume is expected to meet
the requirements of the wage-earn
ers and salaried men.
Andre de Fouqieres, recognized for
several years as the French arbiter
of fashion, announced that he would
purchase one of the suits as soon as
they were placed on sale and that he
would wear it.
ufactured in Roübaix and Tourcoing. |
In producing it the government auth
orities undertook a difficult task as
Much of the cloth has been man
many French manufacturers had been
stripped of their machinery by the
German invaders, money was scarce. !
cotton and wool trebled or quadruple
ed in price and those employed in the
manufacture demanded for a day's
work wages they would have been
glad to accept as a week's pay before
the war.
F ranC jg Xavier BlISaiTI
•o
- cal illness of his fat her,
before h& reached hig bedside . Mr>
jj usam was accompanied *back to
Q reenwood b y b j s s i s ter, Miss Mary
Died Cannelton, Ind.
Ind.,
Mr. Michael Busam returned home
last night from Cannelton,
where he was summoned by the crit
who died
' I
Busam, of St. Augustine, Fla. who will
visit here for several weeks:
The Cannelton Telephone, published
Thursday, November 13th contained
the following account of the death
of Mr. Busam:
Mr. Francis Xavier Busam died at
the home of his son Frank in this city
on last Sunday night of" paralysis,
aged 74 years, past.
His daughter Mamie brought him
home on Sunday, Nov. 2 from St.
Augustine, Fla., where they had re
sided for the past eighteen months.
He reecived a first paralytic stroke
in Cannelton about 20 months ago,
which affected his entire left side but
after going to Florida he regained the
use of himself fairly well until about
six months ago when he received a
second stroke which also afected his
left side and from which he grew
worse, in so much that his daughter
could not care for him alone and
brought him back to the old home
here, where he received a third stroke
last Saturday at noon. From that
+ me until the time of his death 36
hours later he was unconscious.
his profession that of a lithograph
prffiter ior four years, after which
they removed to this city, where, in
September, 1900, she died. He was
ako a painter and during his long
residence here engaged in that work
about tow,: and county, being an ex
pert in his Lue.
Surviving him are fodr sons and
two daughters, as follows:
Frank J. of this city, John of Ow
ensboro,, William of St. Louis, Mike
of Greenwood, Miss., Miss Mary
Busam of St. Augustine, Fla., and
Mrs. Clotilda Rogers of Guthrie, j
Okla. :
During the close of the civil war, for
four months Mr. Busam joined the j
regular army of the United States!
serving only until the war closed. j
He was a man of quiet disposition!
aijd when at himself was a good
workman either at his profession of
lithograph printer which he followed
in New York City and later in St.
Louis, or at his trade as a painter in j
Cannelton. He was a lifelgng mem- ;
ber of the Catholic church and his
funeral was held from St. Michael's, j
this city at 8 a. m. yesterday. His
remains were laid to rest by the side j
of his wife in the Catholic cemetery'
Mr. Busam was born in New York
City June 16, 1845 and married Miss
Mary Kümmel in Cannelton 1870, at
the age of 25 years. They returned
to New York City where he followed
on the hill.
-o
ATTENTION RAILWAY ft EX
PRESS CLERKS.
Next regular meeting of the Green
wood Lodge No. 901, B. of R. C. will
be held on Sunday Nov. 16, 1919 at
3 P. M. in the Odd Fellows Hall.
Your presence is urgently requested.
M. E. CLARK, Sec'y.
M
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3 COL. CART00M— T947"
!
THE COMMUNIST
GOVERNMENT AT
Petrograd Has Rather Primitive But
Effective Method Settling Strikes
Within Its Confines.
Associated Press
LONDON, Nov. 15—The Commun
ist government at Petrograd has a
j
j
... !
er gone.Without their organization
,. , n
they are ineffective and generally go
rather primitive but exceedingly ef
fective method of settling strikes
within its confines, Paul Dukes, a
British secret agent ,told The Asso
ciated Press. They kill the leader and
without leaders probably no workman
in the world is so helpless as the Rus
have employed many ingenious meth- (
number of them have failed and have
been seen no more." Mr. Dukes said
"When a strike is called the Commun- 1
ists' government tries to find the hid-1
den leader. In most cases he finally
is ferretted out and some' morning
the strikers awake to find their lead- j
sian.
Labor leaders involved , in a strike
!
ods to hide their identity but a large j
;
j
1
!
With Limited Force
_ I
back to work under worse conditions
than when they left.
99
-o
Getting Out Paper
The Daily Commonwealth has been
issued with a reduced working force
practically all this week.
Mr. Michael Busam was called to
Cannelton, Ind., by the death of his
father last Sunday, returning home
their level best, and succeeded in get
ting the paper out on time every day,
and i n keeping up with the work in
our extensive job printing depart
men t.
j n fact, The Daily Commonwealth
has the m<^>t faithful employees of
any printing establishment in Missis
sippi, and we have just cause to be
proud of them.
-o
OTpectnen ßef€ät
& _ _ _ .
(JOtlOIt oCeCl iCeOUCtlOIl
In response to a request of the
Chamber of Commerce wired our U.
S. Senators and Hon. B. G. Humph
reys, on the 12th, urging them to use
every means and influence possible to
defeat the effort of Chairman Whit-!
ney, of the Bureau of Soils, Agricul-i
tural Department, to reduce the price |
of cotton seed meal eight or more dol- :
lars o ton, which meant a correspond-.
ing reduction the price of seed, the
following replies were received from
Hon. Pat Harrison and Hon. B. G.
Humphreys., indicating that in com
mon with others they had been sue
cessful in securing revocation of the
order. '
A couple of weeks since, on receipt
of advance information ,from private
sources, by wire, the Chamber of
Commerce Succeeded .through the ef-j
fo.ts of Senator Harrison and Con-j
gressman Humphreys in preventing a
similar effort being made. The!
thanks of the people of this section j
are due pur senators and r ep r ese nt»- j
tive for very efficient aid they have:do
rendered in tilts matter.
yesterday afternoon; and Mr. Sumter
Gillespie served on the grand jury
four days of the week—putting the
job up to Messrs. P. D. Kersh, Char
les Borsch, Miss Lois Jewell, Emery
Quarles and the "old man". They did
CONFRONTED BY
SERIOUS PROBLEM
Brazilian Government Trying To Re
lieve People In Northeastern Sec
tion From Effects Periodic
Droughts.
Associated Press
RIO DE JANEIRO, Nov. 15—One
of the most serious internal problems
with which the Brazil'. 11 government
has to deal is that of relieving the po
pulation of three states in northeas
tern Brazil from the effects of perio
dic drughts. These states—Ceara,
Parahyba and Rio Grande do Norte—
have a combined area of 91,250 square
miles and a population, of approxi
It is officially esti
since 1877, more than
j 1,000,000 persons and an untold num
ber of livestock have died from hun
ger and disease as a result of these
j droughts.
In a message to the Brazilian con
gress President Pessoa has called at
! tention to the situation. He asked
, . _ _
authorization for the government to
(
1
j
! mately 2,000,000.
mated that,
j
; arrange loans, either domestic or
j foreign, amounting to about $10,000,
1 000 a year for a period of not more
canals in affected region, and for sup
! structing reservoirs avid irrigation
than five years for the purpose of con
I plementary projects.
:
-o
_
_ ;
Associated ress
ATHENS, Nov. 15—Piracy on the
high seas by swift motor boats armed
with machine guns is the charge made
against the Turks.
is announced .that numerous Greek
sailing vessels have lodged complaints
of this piracy of which they have been
the victims. The crews have been rob
bed in each case of all their belong
ings, and the cargoes looted.
These up-to-date Turkish pirates,
\ t j s sa j d principally infest the Ae
g ean s ea Q ff the Dardanelles^ and
tbe coast of Asia Minor.
-o
GFeeitWOÖOl UFOPS
Game To Clarksdale
| Clarksdale outplayed the Greenwood
: football team and won the game at
Clarksdale yesterday by a score of 34
to 0 in a fast and well played contest.
Birdsong df Clarksdale was easily
the star of the game, intercepting pas
es and gaining on end runs. F or
Greenwood, Fuller at the end and Ab
bott at the tackle, were the star play-j
ers.
Greenwood will play Greenville at
Greenwood on next Friday, November
21st. Greenville beat the locals two
weeks ago, while Clarksdale won from
both teams by a large score,
Serious accident or minor troubles
j with your tires, Call "Seven Eleven"
j 711 from the nearest telephone, We'll
the rest. 711 Tire ft Accessory
HIGH SEAS PIRACY
BY MOTOR BOATS
j
Armed With Machine Guns, Is Charge
Made Against The Turks, Accord
ing To Greek Vessels.
From Kavalla, it;
o
Co., Life
~
1
j
NO MORE MINERS
RETURN TO WORK
>
Coal Famine In Illinois, Indiana and
Kansas Is Threatened—Situation
Is Alarming.
j
710
j
Associated Press
CHICAGO, Nov. 15—Virtually
increase in the number of bituminous
coal miners returning to work, was
looked for today. The miners appar
ently intend to stand on their deter
mination not to return to work until
the operators and miners represents
tives now meeting in Washington ef-j
feet an agreement on the new wage
scale.
Meanwhile the
fuel shortage is becoming much more
ominous in many places. At Chicago
the available supply of coal has been
diminished to 250,000 tons,
diana and Kansas situation is t grad
threatened fuel
The In
ually becoming alarming .
-o
Circulation Paper
Currency In Germany
_
Associated Press
BERLIN, Nov. 15—The Dresdener
bank of Berlin states that circulation
of paper currency in Germany amoun
ted to 40,125,000,000 marks on Sep-,
tember 23 last, as compared to 2,-j
200,000,000 marks in peace times.
The bank estimates that 15,000,000,
: 000 marks of German paper money
j The unfavorable status of the mark
; in the world exchanges is attributed
j to tbe fi ood 0 f German money that
1 bas g 0ne abroad to pay for imports
estimated at 1 000,000,000 marks since
the revolution.
*
^ CATTHM 1VT \ *
! * 11 JUalVIYi^ A ° *
**************
NEW YORK COTTON MARKET
p rev
q High Low close C ose
___
Dec. - - 36.60j36.95j36.25j36.35j36.60
Jan - - - 35.30j35.50j34.75J34.75J35.50
M ar. - - 33.75,34.00 j33,15 j33.00j34.05
Closed 25 to 105 down.
New York Spots 39.35—25 down.
NEW ORLEANS COTTON MARKET
Prev.
Open High Low Close C os j
Dec. - - 37.50 ;37755 36J70 36.85137^30
jj an . _ _ 35.50135.57 35.00 35.00j35.50
Mar. - - 34.15l34.20 33.45 33.45!33.38|
~C I^ ë d ~ 4 5~tô~ 93~down7--
New Orleans Spots 39 50 25 down.

j is held abroad and that about 25,000,- !
000,000 remains in Germany.
German industry, according to the
bank, has been held in check by the
revolution, political unrest, strikes
and unwillingness to work. Many
firms and industries a"e said to have
been able to keep going only by using
their reserve funds.
At present the bank
sees a tendency toward a decrease in
the number of strikes and toward an
increase in coal production.
!
-o
*
o
Austrian Women
To Practice Law
Associated Press
VIENNA, Nov. 15—Women have
just been admitted to practice before
the civil
of Austria.
CLOTURE BEL
IS ADOPTED
*
This Means That Final Action On The
Peace. Treaty May Be Expected
Within A Week.
«
j
Associated Press
to shut down the debate on the peace
treaty was adopted today in the Sen
ate. The Republican and Democratic
leaders voted together for the cloture
which means that until the treaty is
disposed of, no Senator may speak
more than one hour in all. It is es
bring
*
WASHINGTON, Nov. 15—Cloture
timated that the step would
final action within a week. The vote
adopting the cloture was 78 to 16.
-o
DESTROY MANY
KENTUCKYSTILLS
Twelve Hundred Moonshiners Are Ar
Twelve hundred moonshiners were ar
rested, seven large illicit stills were
destroyed yesterday by revenue offi
cers in the mountains of Laurel and
rested In Mountains By Revenue
Officers.
Associated Press
Nov. 15—
LOUISVILLE
Ky.,
Letcher counties in southeastern Ken
tucky, according to reports received
here today.
-O
The House Votes For
Jim Crom" Cars
u
Associated Press
WASHINGTON, Nov. 15—By a
vote of 142 to 12, the House refused
to incorporate the provision in the
Esch railroad bill that would compel
the abolishment of the
seart on the southern railroads.
_ _ i os 4 -
iSiäCK 003, \^Q3St
Taken by Bolsheviki
Jim Crow
o
!
LONDON, Nov. 15—The eastern
CO ast of the Black Sea from Yelencnik
has been seized by the Insurgent's ar
rear of the«forces of General Dene
kine's anti-Bolsheviiki leaders, accord
ing to Moscow dispatches.
Associated Press
rny of 70 000 men opei*ating in the
o
__ , ^
WarMadeFormer
Emperor Impossible
Associated Press
renback,. president of the German Na
tional Assembly, told the Catholic
Congress ^at Freiburg that the issue
peror William "impossible," according
to the Vossische Zeitung.
BERLIN, Nov. 15—Konstantin Feh
of the war had made the former Em
*
|*
*
MISSISSIPPI — Fair Saturday^
slightly warmer in the southwest por- ;
tionj Sunday fair and warmer, gentle;
northeast winds becoming variable.
-
TEMPERATÜRE —Highest, 59 de
grees; lowest, 28 degrees; at 7 a. m. !
25 degrees; precipitation 0.0; river
gauge 19.2; rise in 24 hours,
casings sold by the Schilling Auto Co.
Goodrich Silvertown Cord, "Best in
Long Run." Call 56 and Service
'will be coming your way.
o
Claims To Be Heir
Rich Scottish Estate
Associated Press
EDINBURGH, Scotland, Nov. 15—
John Backstraw, a bricklayer claim
ing to be heir to a rich Scottish es
tate, has begun an effort to obtain
possession of ten square miles of land
with an annual rent roll of $150,000.
The estates concerned are now the
property of the Lennox family of Du
barton. The claimant alleges that he j
can trace his ancestry to 1581 and;
that his great-great grandmother was j
descendant of Douglas, sixth Duke
of Hamilton, and a nephew of Mary
Queen of Scots.
a
■0
**************
THE WEATHER *
*
****** -***-*•**!
* *
-o
Positive service on all automobile
o
Myrick's Vulcanizing cannot be beaten;
work guaranteed arour business solicited
O
You can't make a mistake in buy
ing a Big Six Studebaker car. Th
best value on the market for the
Call Schilling Auto Co. fo
pnee.
demonstration.
-
COPY VC PER YEAR <6.00
NATIONAL WAGE
SC. LE NOT FIXED
Will Take
up Settlement of Wages In
Central Competitive Fields in
«
Washington Conference.
j
Associated Press
WASHINGTON,, Nov. 15—After
a long and acrimonious wrangle to
day, representatives of the coal
ators and hiiners
agreed to take up the settlement of
the wage and labor conditions in the
central competitive fields .after they
failed to agree on considering the Nat
ional scale as first proposed. The op
erators from districts outside the cen
tral fields will meet this afternoon to
determine whether an agreement ef
fecting the central fields, will be
cepted as a basis for contracts in out
lying districts.
oper
conference here,
ac
LEWIS DENIES BAD FAITH.
WASHINGTON, Nov. 15—Accep
tance by them without qualification
by the mine workers of Secretary
Labor Wilson's proposal for negotia
tion i nthe nation-wide wage scale
agreement, was announced at the con
ference today by John L. Lewis, act
ing president of the United
Workers of America. Lewis sharply
denied charges of bad faith over the
coal strike and negotiations.
William Green, secretary and treas
user of the Mine Workers Union took
exception to Secretary Wilson's state
ment Friday, that a sixty percent
wage increase was impossible.
Mine
-o
CLOTURE RULE
SPEEDS PROGRAM
Invoked For First Time in History of
the Senate—Hitchcock's Substi
tute Rejected.
Associated Press
WASHINGTON,
Nov. 15—Action
in invoking the Cloture Rule for the
first time in the Senate's history, re
sulted in immediate speeding up of
the reservation program. The next
reservation relating to mandates was
adopted without debate or roll call.
The Senate then rejected by a vote
of 52 to 43 the substitute proposed by
Senator Hitchcock to the Committee
on Resérvations, relative to the reten
tion by this government of control ov
er domestic questions.
-o
Hope Settling R. R.
Dispute Vanishes
Associated Press
WASHINGTON, Nov. 15—Hope of
immediate settlement of the demands
of the Railroad Brotherhoods, vanish
ed today, when further sessions of the
conference between Director General
Hines and the heads of the Brother
hoods, was postponed indefinitely.
seeking to carry out a spectacular
operation to strengthen the Fiume
party which is reported to have lost
groun in ta > in t e past three
wee s *
Eolsheviki have occupied Omsk, the
capital of all Russian government, a
Moscow official communique asserted,
-o
Founder Boston
Orchestra Dead
BOSTON, Nov. 15—Major Henry
L. Higginson, banker and founder of
the Boston Symphony Orchestra, died
at a hospital here last night, follow
ing an operation.
o
Dannunzio Reported
To Have Left Fiume
PARIS,
Nov. 15—The American
peact; delegation has received a tele
gram from Vice Consul O'Hara at
Trieste, telling of reports that Gab
rielle Dannunzio had left Fiume and
landed on the Dalmatian coast, where
he plunged in another adventure.
The importance attached to peace
conference circles to D' Annunzio's
movements is because Sunday is elec
tion day in Italy with Fiume as the
chief issue. It is thought that he is
o
Bolsheviki Occupy
Capital of Russia
LONDON, Nov. 15—The Russian
-o
D'Annunzio On
The Dalmatian Coast
Associated Press
15 — Gabrielle
Nov.
D'Ahnunzio has landed at Zara on
the Dalmatian coast, according to
news received here.
TRIESTE,

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