OCR Interpretation


Greenwood daily commonwealth. (Greenwood, Miss.) 1919-1926, November 20, 1919, Image 1

Image and text provided by Mississippi Department of Archives and History

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87065131/1919-11-20/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

-
(Srmtuiauii latlg (Üummmuuealtff
MISSISSIPPI'S LIV EST LITTLE BIG NEWSPAPER.
PUBLISHED EVERY AFTÉRNOON EXCEPT SUNDAY
ASSOCIATED PRESS NEWS SERVICE
J. L. & S. GILLESPIE, Editors and Publishers
PER MONTH 60c
PER YEAR 66.00
GREENWOOD, LEFLORE COUNTY, MISSISSIPPI, 1ÖURSDAY AFTERNOON, NOVEMBER 20, 1919
SUBSCRIPTION: "g*? 5c
VOLUME 4—NUMBER 70
NEWS PRINT PAPER BUSINESS MEN
GIVE SUPPORT
;
I
SOARS SKYWARD
Profiteering Of Paper Manufacturers Prominent Citizens Indorse Movement :
To Build a Home In This City
For Business Women.
Threatens Life of American Newspa
Investigation Asked.
I
papers
!
for
NEW YORK.—Thirteen cents a
pound, f. o. b. mill, was asked
print paper here during this week. :
The price was for car load lots, and
was made to one of the largest pur
chasers of sheet print paper in the,
The mill refused to make a
of anything less than thirteen j
i
country.
price
cents.
CHICAGO.—It is reliably reported;
here that one of the large daily papers I
of the city has made an offer of ten ;
cents a pound for 1,000 tons of roll,
print, and has not found a mill that
will take the order. The Chicago pa
pers are being forcecl to omit a large
amount of advertising from every is- j
sue because of the shortage of print
paper.
WASHINGTON. — Complaints of
inability to secure print papeV
into government offices here.
are
pouring
Newspapers are reporting prices of
eight, nine and as high
cents being asked for print paper, and
when orders are placed at these pri
ces it is possible to secure only very
small quantities, not nearly enough to
meet their needs.
as twelve
One of the largest
wholesale paper dealers of the country ;
reports print paper prices going up-j
ward every day, with a raise in one ;
a hundred.!
OMAHA.
week of more than $1
Many mills are refusing to accept or-;
ders at any price, and a forced sus- !
pension of many papers is looked for:
as there is no prospect of any relief
in the immediate future.
WITH PROFI- !
CHARGE MILLS
TEERING.
WASHINGTON.—Small daily and I
threatened
weekly newspapers
with destruction because of inability •
to obtain print paper, the house was:
told by Representative Reavis (Rep.).!ii
He charged that news
are
Nebraska.
print manufacturers were refusing to
sell small publishers, in order to fill j
the wants of the metropolitan dailies.
Paper consumption by the big city
dailies and magazines has greatly in
creased, Mr. Reavis said, by an
tensive national advertising campaign
conducted to defeat the government !
in collecting taxes." He urged that ;
the internal revenue bureau investi
gate the returns of concerns conduct
ing the campaign to disclose to what
extent their excess profits tax was
reduced by the costs of the advertis
ex
ing.
-O
THE GERMAN MEN
MAKE COMPLAINTS
To The Effect That American Soldiers
Are "Spoiling" German Girls W ith
Luxuries, Etc. j
Associated Press
WITH THE AMERICAN FORCES
IN GERMANY, Nov. 20 Among the
civilians in the American occupied j
complaints, originating with the j
often heard to the
spoiling" the German girls by heap
ing luxuries upon them by spending
recklessly for presents,
area
German men, are
effect that the American soldiers are
wines
Since the anti-»fraternization regu
lation was revoked by army headquar
several weeks ago the cafes in,
Coblenz have been crowded each night
with soldiers and frauleins, and manj
of the German men have openly as
serted that the Americans were en
tirely too considerate of the German
women and girls.
Cafes in Coblenz and other towns
In the zone held by United States
troops have been doing lately the
greatest business of their existence.
One in Coblenz which is conducted by
two Americans who recently obtained
their discharge from the army, seats
twenty-two hundred persons.
Sunday afternoons and evenings, the
crowd becomes so great, American-'
and Germans all together, that on
eral occasions the military police had
to be called to maintain order.
money
and good things to eat.
ers
Yet o"
sev
-o
Power Printing
Press For Sale
Prouty Power Printing Press in
good condition, at a real bargain. Will
print six, seven or eight column folio
paper, and large circular work.
Hakes a clean, clear-cut impression.
Reason for selling we have installed
Address The Daily
a faster press.
Commonwealth, Greenwood, Miss.
-o
If you want one of the very bes
values in an automobile for less than
$8,000.00 just try the Big Six Stude
baker. Schilling Auto Go., can mak
ciiatn dalivery.
...»
■*
gl
The business men of the city are
giving their support to the campaign
which has been launched to raise $50,
000 between now and Christmas to;
purchase a lot and build a home for
the business women of the city.
Following are a few expressions of:
the business men, regarding the pro—
posed structure :
FoPowing are a few expressions of
the business men, regarding the pro-,
posed structure:
'"I think there is a great need for,
such a place and I am sure that this!
bank will do all it can to aid the
movement,
"R. A. BALL, Cashier.
"Greenwood Bank & Trust Co.
"Everyone thinks it is a good thing
and a great thing for the community
and I hope you can raise the neces-l
sary funds.
"LATHAM RAY.
"First National Bank.
"The plan as outlined seems feasible
and most worthy, and I will co-operate
in any way possible. Some relief is
needed and it occurs to me that this
yy
plan will give it.
ested in such a move, and will do all
j can assist in the work.
"G. A. WADE, Pres.
"Wade Hardware Co."
I am, and have been deeply inter
J. E. MANN, Vice-Pres.
Henderson-Baird Hardware Co.
"i am gi a( j to help in any way I
can to build a home for the business
ft
'omen of Leflore County.
"G. A. WILSON, JR.,
"Wilson Banking Co."
"A fine thing. I will co-operate in
I every way possible,
"JOHN PETTEY, Mgr.,
"Planters Oil Mill.

«j appreciate the need for some re
e f in this regal'd, although we en
deavor to employ home girls, as far
as possible. The movement is worthy
j an d the plan appears feasible, and as
suc h a home. I do not employ any
! jr ir i S) but I know it is next to im
; p OSS jble for a women to rent a room,
j endorse the movement and hope for
j^ s S p e edy termination,
«r l. DUNN, Mgr.
outlined, has my approval.
"J. W. QUINN, Pres.
"Quinn Drug Co.'"
"There is no doubt of the need of
yy
Dunn Commission Co.
H
-o
THE REDUCTION
NAVAL ARMAMENT
The Kokumin Shimbun Publishes Ar
ticle Pointing Out Difficulties In
volved On Reduction Thereof.
Associated Press
TOKIO, Nov. 20—The Kokumin
ghj m b un publishes an article pointing
QU ^. difficulties involved on the
re( j uc tion
it
of naval armaments,
that the fact that the final vic
tory won by the Allies was dUe large
tQ gI . eat naval power of the
^ g r ;j.j s h Empire will surely be a bar
says
to the solution of the armament re
! duction problem to be dealt with by
L ea g U e Nations. Above all,
j Japan b e i n? surrounded by the sea,
mug ^. (j e p enc i upon commodities im
por<;C( j f rom other countries,
;
The Kokumin adds that even if F
present conditions of the navy be
made the standard of the reduction
of armament ,Great Britain and Am
will not feel danger for their
erica
national defence. But Japan has not
even a sufficiency for defence and can
not admit that the present condition
of the navy is the standard of arm
ament. The Kokumin also expressed
the opinion that it would be unfair
to make the length of coast line the;
standard of the restriction of arma-j
ment.
J Y McNeill Homestead
Berclair Brings $18,650
The J. Y. McNeill homestead at
Berclair, was sold here yesterday at
the courthouse by A. R. Bew, special
commissioner, at public auction and
was bought by Mr. W. L. McLeod of
Berclair. The homestead includes the
residence and one store and was pur
chased tor $18,650. Fifty nine and
three tenths acres comprise the home
stead.
Mr. McLeod operates a store at
Berclair.
As a mere formality the sale will
necessarily he 1 confirmed by the Chan
cery Chart within the next month.
-*
;■
w.
Sb
D
Waiting for Something to Drop
1
U
^77
7A
1
/,n
i
[UJ
/
I
:€b
£ 1
1
I
£
4 '
»
i
Yr
%
1
%
s
%
/A
I
1
(/
„ WHEN IT COMES" -
i -To J06WINÖ Mx
$ Trtftt mo *
'THfcRC ALlRl&Hf
Va
1
i
rS
a
â
//
Us
mmû
1
YS,
yyyyyyy y '
^yy/yyy y£&. '
y.
*7,
7
7
Y.
m
Vs
i
%
i
/
m.
V.
y
y
1
>;
m
v>y,
y*
i
///
i
/
Ys
1
1
y
YPfy.
1
1
I
I
i
W(( 11
V/
1
-Ä.
X
I
y.
//
XX/
Y
7
%
y
X
y
g
_
y^yyÆyyy^/y
X
y/y/z/y
yy/yy/'
y.
\
m
<y
G. ED. WILLIAMS
CHANCERY JUDGE
By
Certified Returns Give Him Majority
of 20 Votes Over Rowe Hays In
Election To Fill Vacancy.
19—Ed
Nov.
Miss.,
Fontaine of Coahoma county was here
yesterday having come down, as chair
man of the election commissioners of
JACKSON,
The Coahoma returns were lost in
the mail and there has for several |
that county, to bring a certified copy
of the recent election returns.
days been a doubt as to who was elec
ted Chancellor, Rowe Hays or G. Ed.
Williams, the latter a resident of this
city for several years.
The contest between Messrs. Hayes
and Williams was decided by Secre
tary of State Joseph W. Po"wer, Mr
Hays case being presented by George
W. May, while Judge Mayes,
Garland Lyell, George P. Butler and
Clayton D. Potter appeared for Mr.
Williams.
It seems that some of the tickets
in Coahoma county were incorrectly
G.
printed. Williams' name appearing
G. Howard Williams while it should
G. Edward Williams." It
stated that the supreme court of
as
have been
was
Mississippi has held that variance in
initials do not invalidate a ballot, the
test being the intention of the voter
and it was on the theory that Secre
tary Power decided for Williams.
The returns as brought in by Mr.
Fontaine gave the election to Williams
by a majority of twenty votes. Mr.
Williams was here yesterday and re
ceived the congratulations of many
friends.
The Chancellor's race in the seventh
district was to fill an unexpired term
and proved highly interesting. Rowe
Hays, who ran against Williams, i r
ell known here .while the new Chan
cellor represented this county one
term in the State senate.
\\
-o
SAVED BY RUSSIAN
ARTILLERY FIRE
From Annihilation By Russian Mut
ineers At Tulga Shortly Before
Leaving Russia.
j
LONDON, Nov. 20—British officers
commanding troops which have since
been withdrawn from the Archangel
j and Murmansk fronts were saved by
j Russian artillery fire from annihila
; tion by Russian mutineers at Tulgau
shortly before they left Russia. The
story has just been told by a special
correspondent who was with the Brit
ish forces in North Russia.
Some of the British were in a hu+
when they were fired upon by one o*
the mutineers through an open door
way. The Russian missed and was
shot down, his failure revealing plans
for a general Russian massacre. All
the wires, except one to a village
where loyal Russian artillerymen
were stationed, had been cut and t v
mutineers were preparing to turn ma
chine guns upon the British when the
trapped men telephoned the Russian
gunners, immediately the loyal Rus
sians began to drop 4.5 shells among
the mutineers and the British escap
at
at
of
the
at
will
ed.
FIFTY DEÉBTS
WANTED AT ONCE
The successful applicants for the
positions will be commissioned as
First Lieutenants and Captains in
the United States Public Health Ser
vice, and will receive pay at the same
a. i h *
rate, plus allowances for commuta
,. . , „ .
tion, etc., as do officers of correspon
' . ., . . , n ..
ding grades in the Army. A bulleti
issued by Major Gen. William G.
Haan, in charge of soldier employ
By The United States Public Health
Service To Fill Existing Vacancies
—Preference Given Soldiers.
WASHINGtON, Nov. 20-(Special)
—Fifty dentists are wanted at once by
the United States Public Health Ser
vice to fill existing vacancies.
Service and Information Branch of the
Office of the Assistant to the Secre
tary of War has jttet been advised of
| these opportunities, which, if possi
ble, are to be* iïùeé by honorably dis
charged soldiers and sailors.
The
ment, says:
This is a rare opportunity for for
mer members of the Dental Corps who
are desirous of making government
service their profession. They wi;
continue their work under practically
the same condition as surround Army
life. Moreover these positions are not
ohly open to former officers of Army,
but to any qualified enlisted man.
Those who are desirous of appoint
ment are notified to make applications
immediately to the Surgeon General
of the United States Public Health
Service, (Attention of the Dental Sec
tion,) Washington, D. C.
U
yy
-o
**************
*,
*
»COTTON MARKETS*
* ' *
**************
NEW YORK COTTON MARKET
Prev
Open High Low Close C ose
35.90 36.70 35.50j36.40|36.15|
34.00 35.07 33.70 i34.85 34.36j
Dec.
Jan.
Mar. - - 32.00j33.33 31.88j33.00j32.52
Closed 25 to 48 up.
New York Spots 39.25—10 up.
NEW ORLEANS COTTON MARKET
Prev.
Open High Low Close C'.os
36.35 36 97 35780 36 95 36755
34.20 35.20 33.80 34.95 34.57
32.10 33.61 32.00 33.32 32.81
Dec.
Jan.
Mar.
Closed 41 to 51 up.
New Orleans Spots 39.00.
-o
**************
*
*
* THE WEATHER *
*
*
*************4
MISSISSIPPI—Fair and warmer
on Thursday; Friday partly cloudy
probably showers; gentle to moderate
east and northeast winds.
a. m.
river
TEMPERATURE—Highest, 68 de
grees ;lowest, 36 degrees; at 7
40 degrees; precipitation 0.0;
gauge 20.2; rise in 24 hours 0.6.
■o
Auto accidents must be avoided—
Thermoid brake lining and Sparton
horns.—Let us equip your car!
KIMBROUGH AUTO CO.
PHONE 992.
<F
has driven the rum demon
to coyer, but has packs of hungry
wolves out in the open.
ff
THE U. S. GOOD TO
BLIND SOLDIERS
x , . , Ti ...
erty owners, and of good Italian stock.;
Everyone who is interested in our.sol-!
diers will be glad to know that Salva- !
tore is in receipt of $157.50 each!"«
month .and that this will continue as
Io n g as he lives. I
i-> , , ... . . j
Every blinded soldier is rated as ;
being totally and permanently dis
iii .a 1
abled; consequently compensation is
awarded him at the rate of $100.00
per month. This dates from the time
, , 0 14 -
of discharge, and as Salvatore was
. , . T a.- a.
discharged m June, compensation at
a. r , ,
the rate of $100.00 a month has been
paid him from that date.
While in service he took out $10,
000 insurance, and under the total dis
ability clause in the policy he is en
titled to monthly payment of $57.50
as long as he lives. If he had died
his mother would have received mon
thly payments for the same amount
for a period of twenty years. But if
Salvatore should live for fifty years
Case of Salvatore Filippo at Erie, Pa.,
Is An Example of What This Coun
try Does For Unfortunate Vets.
WASHINGTON,
Nov. 20—(Spec
ial)^—-Few people are aware of the
general provision made by different
government agencies for our blinded
soldiers. Salvatore Filippo, a mem
ber of a prominent Italian family, was
blinded while serving with the Amer
j ican forces in France. The Filippo
family are American citizens, prop
longer, he would still receive the mon
thly payments on his insurance. Be
sides this it is not necessary or him
to make any further payments for
the premiums on his policy.
In addition to the financial benefits
which he obtains ,the Federal Board
for Vocational Education provides a
special department which .cares for
the interests of the blinded soldiers.
*,
*
Last month they sent a representative
to Salvatore's home for the sole pur
pose of visiting Salvatore and ex
plaining to him what could be done in
the way of re-education.
He was instructed that he could
given instruction free of charge to
him, that being the manner in which
the government seeks to provide for
the men who whipped the Huns.
start a course in Braille reading and
writing for the blind, use of the type
writer and manual training. As soon
as he makes up his mind which one of
the courses he is to take, he will be
-o
A ten dollar bumper has often sav
ed a fifty dollar radiator.
KIMBROUGH AUTO CO.
PHONE 992.
o
It is possible the U. S. may some
day have a labor President, but not
at all probable that he'll be elected by
a labor party.
-o
You can't make a mistake in buy
ing a Big Six Studebaker car. Th
best value on the market for th'
price. Call Schilling Auto Co. fo
demonstration.
-o
Coal operators are willing to pay
miners $10 a minute, if allowed to
add it to the price of coal.
•o
Serious accident or minor troubles
with your tires, Call "Seven Eleven'
711 from the nearest telephone, We'll
do the rest. 711 Tire & Accessory
Co., Inc.
SOUTH IS ON
WARTIME BASIS
For Coal Supply—Regional Directors
Have Free Stand As To What Are
Non-Essential Industries.
Associated Press
CHICAGO, Nov. 20—The regional
directors of railroads today had a free
stand to deal with the curtailment of j
; non-essential industries and unneces-1
! sary passenger traffic and extra-;
ordinary efforts to conserve the na-j
tions diminishing coal supply are be
ing made. Under that authority,
granted by Director General Hines,
I orders have already been issued pit
-ting the entire South east of the Mis
sissppi and south of the Ohio rivers
on a wartime ration basis. Deliver
ies to the consumers will be held to
one ton to the household. A majority
of the union miners are maintaining
a disposition to disi'egard the strik
recall order.
VLADOVOSTOCK, Nov. 20—Revo
lutionary forces which tried to seize
the control of the city were defeated. ;
Governmental forces control the en- ;
tire city.
The Revolutionary movement which
was against the Kolchak government
started Monday under the leadership
of General Gaida, former commander
of the Czecho Slovak forces on the
Siberian front. Gaida was wounded
and captured during the fighting in
Vladivostock.
-o
Revolutionary
Forces Defeated
Associated Press
!
EDINBURGH, Nov. 20—Scores ofi
American visitors to Scotland have;
wondered by whom and on what occa
sions the picturesque native dress of
Scotland, kilts, are worn nowadays,
TT . . . __,
inc l uir y 1 _
! fP ar ^ om ac ua ^ an
each!"« 55 • wl ' ere ^77 '* eXpe f e, i
ress » e ' ,, ere ^^„^withnnt
I c,asses ° f kll ' ed ** «■»**£ w ' th "" t
comment m Scotland. In the North,
; , . . , , ., „
the head of clans and septs, the gen
. . . . . , „ ,__
try —which includes Englishmen,
is / , ^
Welshmen, and anyone who owns land
uses as a p aygroum , m re ,
the public piper; and all over Scot
* . _. „
a. land, the soldier. As an evening dress
at . , , ,
it also has a degree of general popu
-o
Occasions On Which
Kilts Are To Be Worn
Associated Press
larity.
-0
Berlin Renters Have
No Heat Nor Light
Associated Press
BERLIN, Nov. 20—Rent payers of
Berlin who are unable to obtain heat
light owing to the shortage of coal
will receive a rebate of that propor
which ordinarily
or
tion of their rent
would pay for these comforts. A Ber
lin Ministry has appointed a commis
sion to determine the sum which shall
.
vxGl*lTl3.ri XllSlOry
Of The Great War
be credited to the rent payers.
-o
Associated Press
BERLIN, Nov. 20—The general
staff's story of the war written from
the official archives will soon be issued
and will be entitled "The Battles and
Fights of the Great War of 1914
1918". The account is to contain a
consecutive and ordered description of
a n battles in which German troops
participated,
o
O, well, everybody will soon be turn
ing to politics anyhow.
-o
Last ditch legal fighting comes
high, but booze money came easy.
-o
The Senate can always keep up its
average on parliamentary hair-split
ting.
by
o
As a public scarer, coal prices are
close second to a coal famine.
Switzerland has an air fleet, prob
ably to keep track of rich tourists.
-o
Serious accident or minor troubles
with your tires, Call "Seven Eleven"'
711 from the nearest telephone, We'll
711 Tire & Accessory
o
pay
to
do the rest.
Co., Inc.
BLANK FORMS—Rent, Share am
Abstract Blanks
Lease Contracts;
Notice of Protest; Promissory Notes
Collateral Notes; Nurses Records;
Posted Sign Cards, For Sale and
Rent Sign Cards at The Daily Com
monwealth Office.
SENATE LAYS
ASIDE TREATY
Peace No Nearer Than Day Armistice
Was Signed—Three Attempts To
Ratify Fail.
Associated Press
WASHINGTON, Nov. 20—The fate
of the peace treaty with Germany and
the League of Nation, so far as the
United States is concerned ,is again
in the hands of President Wilson,
The failure of last night and today
to have the treaty ratified in some
form by the Senate, brought the sit
the League of Nations, so far as the
ago, when the pact was submitted to
the upper house of Congress and teeh
nically, peace is no nearer than when
the armistice was signed,
The decision of the Senate to lay
aside the treaty came after two at
tempts to ratify it with the Foreign
Relations Committee reservations at
tached and when one attempt to adopt
it without the reservations failed. T
first vote on the treaty with the res
ervations was 39 for and 55 against.
The second vote showed 49 for and 51
against. The vote for straight rati
fication was 38 for and 53 against.
The Senate then adjourned sine die.
The next session begins December 1.
There is no intimation today as to
; what will be the next move of the
;
President in connection with the trea
ty. The Democratic leaders sugges
ted, however, that the President might
during the recess feel out the oth
er powers as to their attitude on the
reservations with the view to bring
the treaty to some sort of ratifica
tion at the December session of Con
gress. Meanwhile, the other nations
which have ratified the treaty, ac
cording to the view taken here, may
proceed with negotiations to restore
diplomatic and commercial relations
withe Germany.
The conference will be qomposed of
seventeen men, including government
! officials, business men, former raem
bers of the cabinet and former state
governors. It will carry on the work
undertaken by the National Industrial
Conference, which was foundered on
t
the rock of collective bargaining.
PRESIDENT MAKES NO STATE
MENT.
WASHINGTON,
20—Presi
Nov.
dent Wilson will have no statement to
make on the failure of the Senate to
ratify the treaty of Versailles, it was
stated at the White House today.
•o
Senate Rejects
The Nomination
Associated Press
WASHINGTON, Nov. 20—Action
by the Senate on the nominations be
fore the adjournment, made public to
day, disclosed that the nomination of
George B. Witt, as United States Mar
shall of the Middle West District of
Tennessee, was rejected.
-o
Sends Message To
Other Governors
Associated Press
DES MOINES, la., Nov. 20—Gov
ernor Harding prepared messages to
day to the governors of the other coal
producing states, suggesting that a
conference to consider the question of
concerted action, toward the resump
tion of mining under state control.
-o
Steamship Sends
Out S. O. S. Calls
Associated Press
NEW YORK, Nov. 20— S. O. S.
calls were received here today from
the steamship Roman, bound from
New York to Marseille, which is be
ing buffeted by rough seas with her
clearing gear broken,
about 350 miles off Sandy Hook. The
coast guard cutter has gone to her as
sistance.
The vessel is
-o
Charles Barrett Is
Re-elected President
j
Associated Press
a
MEMPHIS, Nov. 20—The final ses
sion of the annual convention of the
Farmers Educational Co-operation
Union o{ America ,re-elected Charles
Barrett president of the organization.
Virtually all the other officers were re
j
-o
President Calls
Industrial Conference
Associated Press
WASHINGTON, Nov. 20—Presi
dent Wilson today appointed a new
industrial conference and called it in
to session here December 1.

xml | txt