OCR Interpretation


Greenwood daily commonwealth. (Greenwood, Miss.) 1919-1926, November 25, 1919, Image 1

Image and text provided by Mississippi Department of Archives and History

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87065131/1919-11-25/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

*
(Ütwtutoflh
%
r
%
\
f.
\
1
X
»
MISSISSIPPI'S LI
LITTLE^ BIG NEWSPAPER.
PUBLtSRi»"* 1 "* ' Jï AFTERNOON EXCEPT SUNDAY
~ TUESDAY AFTERNOON, NOVEMBER 25, 1919
f
, 77
J. L. & S. GILLESPIE, Editors and Publishers
'"Tv, ; -
■■ • y a*
ASSOCIAT
SI Z%f5c
*
VOLUME 4—NUMBER 74
GREENWOOD, LEFLORE COUNTY, MIS
SUBSCRIPTION:
RESENTS INSULT U.
TO PRES. WILSON
W. D. Corley, Mississippi Cotton Plan- In
ter and Mine Owner, Punches La
bor Leader's Face In Colorado.
What à former Mississippian ,a citi
zen of Tutwiler, and one who is well
known in Clarksdale and who former
ly resided here, thought of an insult
to President Wilson, is vividly but
briefly told in a short clipping from
a Denver, Colo., paper. It follows:
COLORADO SPRINGS, Nov. 4—
"President Wilson is a liar.' '
Biff!
It all happened in a flash.
Then biff again and biff! biffff!
The man who called Preisdent Wil
son a liar and was biffed was Daniel
Davis, a member of the scale commit
tee of the Colorado Springs local of
the United Workers of America and
deputy organizer for that organiza
tion.
in
who
The man who did the biffing was
W. D. Corley, wealthy Southern cot
ton grower and owner of the Stark
Corley coal mine just north of Colo
rado Springs.
DAVIS IS HUSTLTD OUT OF THE
OFFICE.
There would have been much more
of
at
biffing had not other members of the
Vale committee seized Davis and hus- P
him from Corley'office. The oth- «
1 k of the committee realized
of
their cause. They ec *
\ assist Davis but
did not attempt to a getting* him y
devote^their efforts ti. doing so
outride of Corley s offiecv» ma ft er
^UTeir utmost to hush up tB* * be
Later Davis was removed fr x
scale committee because his " e
had ended his usefulness as a nien vvill
of that body.
Davis attack upon Pres.t ent i '\
son was made a con trence e
tween Corlev and the scale committee ed
tween v,oney a
er meml )ers
in a flash < he Kravlty Davls as '
integrity of the pres
ited States and the
sault upon t.
ident of the
harm it would do
j*
er side.
Davis assumed to act as spokesman
of the committee and when he told
Corley that he either would have to
sign à contract with the union or see
his mine permanently closed, the cot
ton grower replied: "Well Ï 11 stand
President Wilson's statement that
this strike is illegal."
This angered Davis, who sprang to of
President Wilson
is a liar."
No sooner, the story goes on to re
cite, had the labor leader made the
than Corley leaped over the
desg and began a punishment that
only stopped whn Davis, his nose
bleeding and his eyes bruised and ' ' I)
" y h l as'! ÏST I
of the local miners' union in Corley's
office.
flat-top desk while the union repre
sentatives occupied chairs on the oth
Corley sat at one side of a
on
his feet and saffi:
44
utterance
was
o
GAY HOLIDAY SEASON PLANNED j
For the past two years, the great
shadow over the gay hol
and social functions were
With the lifting of the
festivities are being
war cast a
iday season
eliminated.
war colud, many
planned in
Christmas time and the social calen
to be filled with inter
Greenwood for a merry
der promises
esting events for the Yule-tide season.
Among the many charming func
tions which are being planned is a
dance at the Elks Club on Deeemoer _ t
23rd, which will be given by Mrs. -j t
A. Malone for her daughter, Miss
Susan, who is a student at Agnes j
Scott college. Invitations for thife af
fair will be issued with a ffcw days.
Mrs. Bonner Richardson will also
honor Miss Malone with a dance at
her home on River Front on Decern
Mr. Locke Arnold of Jackson, spent
the week end with his mother, ^ rs * !
Fannie G. Arnold and his sister, Mrs.
Maude Guess. j
,
head, was a visitor in Greenwood on
Mr. Claude Duggan, who has been
Î11 for the past ten days with an in-;
fected foot, is improving. He is ill
at the home of Mrs. J. H. Sutton, cor
Church and Cotton street.
* ******
Capt. R. W. Harvey was here today
from his plantation home near Itta
Bena on business.
ber 26th.
******
******
Attorney Percy Allen of Moor
Sunday.
******
ner
******
Mrs. Mullen and Miss Willie Cross
land of Sunflower, spent yesterday
shopping in Greenwood.
******
Miss Mable Comstock spent the
week end with relatives in Yazoo City.
******
The cost.to the country "of the Pres
ident's illness will remain a matter
for speculation, but he himself will
face the definite and concrete to the
amount of a pretty penny when
the bills of all
medical
apaebrtista.
v
J
m
\
U. S. SUPPLANTING
GREAT BRITAIN.
In the Coal Markets of South America
And Europe, Is Evidenced By The
Shipping World .
r
Associated Press
LONDON, Nov. 25—Evidence that
America is supplanting Great Britain
in coal markets of South America and
Europe is seen by the Shipping
World. The paper attributes this to
restrictions imposed on shipping that
otherwise might be available for car
rying British coal.
"The result is that traders abi'oad
who want coal are getting it from
"The South
other regions, 1 ' it says.
American trade has fallen almost in
evitably into the hands of shipowners
from the .United States; but more
ominous still is the fact that ship
ments from Virginia are coming al
most daily to ports of Europe. Goth
enburg, Dunkirk, Antwerp, Rotter
dam, Lisbon, Genoa and other ports
of Italy are receiving American coal
at freight rates which only their
Even to
urgent needs can justify.
Port Said American coals have been
shipped.
"The question arises whether this is
merely a P assin S P hase due t( > tEe
P res « nt scarcity of tonnage, or wheth
« these American ships are
P^neers of a few form of enterprise
of the Western continent which is de
stined to become a permanent fea
ture of trade. It must not be assum
ec * that, with the increase of British
shipping that will assuredly come in a
y ear or two, the old lines of trade will
so e asily be regained. The river plate
trade may to a considerable extent
be written off .
e an ports to the United Kingdom
vvill be an advantage to British ship
\owners in their endeavor to regain the
'\ n tinential trade, but it will be no
break the trade connec
ed sy t •>
tions that Æïëïîcan competitors are
now engaged in forming."
the
;
The greater proximity of Europ
u
_ _ . —,_Greenwood
To Tupelo LhUrCh
_
The session of North Mississippi
Methodist Conference just closed at ;
Aberdeen, assigned Rev. J. A. Hall,
who has been the popular pastor here not
the past four years, to the pastorate
of the Tupelo Church.
Rev. R. A. Tucker, of Grenada
,comes to Greenwood as the pastor of jj
the church here for the ensuing year.. Qn
Rev. S. L. Pope ,of Columbus was of
made Presiding Elder of this the h
Winona District.
I) ea th Of Well KllOWI* j
I • Labor Leader Occurs |

xv^V* • .^V.* Hält vfOGS
o
-o
j CAPETOWN, Nov. 25—The death
of j T ßain> the well-known labor
He fig-;
leader, is announced here,
ured in intennational news during the j
wide-spread labor doubles on Janu
ary, 1914, when he and seven other !
were deported from the dominion
men
Later they were gran
as agitators.
Socialist in the eighties, before
em jg ra ^ ed to South Africa.
_ t j^ ied himself with the movement for
-j t he independence of the Transvaal,
during the South African War
j -
TQ THE TAXPAYERS OF THE
CITY OF GREENWOOD.
You are hereby notified that the
Hon Chöncel i or of the 7th Chancery
District> will ^ it at t h e Court House
in the City of Greenwood on Thurs
day, the 27th day of November, 1919,
p Ur p OSe G f hearing any and all
* ! objections which may be filed by any
^ aX p a y er to the issuance of $75,000.00
j WO rth of bonds for the City of Green-!
wood, for the purpose of paving, curb-,
, ing and guttering that part of Hen-:
ry g treet f rom Dewey Street to Wal
thall Street; Fulton Street from!
Washington Street to Jackson^Btreet;
Palace street from Fulton Street to;
Cotton street; Walthall Street from
ill Henry street to Johnson Street; Main:
g treet from Henry Street to Carroll-!
ton Avenue ;Johnson Street from
Main street to Walthall Street; Pearl
gtreet from Lamar Street to the Y . j
& M y Railroad; Dewey Street from
Washington Street to Henry Street; j
Henry Street to South Boulevard, j
South Boulevard from Henry Street
to Alabama Street; Henry Street from j
South Boulevard to Parkway, and
Parkway from Henry Street to Gor
This hearing will be for the pur
pose of validating the above described
bonds, according to the statute made
Given under my hand and official
seal, this the 20th day of November,
1919.
A. R. BEW, v
Chancery Clerk,
ted amnesty.
Mr. Bain was an active Scottish
he
He iden
the
don street.
and provided.
' (Seal)
r*

r
a
Mue
b Be Thankful For
£ wr
LI!
ï**
AT
y=
pier^^
ish
V
«
s
am «
iai
- -
»•••%
ilf*.
• 3 -
MÎ7
»
• I
Vi.
iiu I]
»»•LT
k mm
•«
if
*.

t
».
rï •
&
f •
I

m
r **•
*'*i
•ul
W.
y
% %
I
I
i
33
m
g
Pi
ii.
\ -Jm *
s.
ts s
&
»
7 )
v

V
(Copyright*
LOCKE SANDERS
WAS BADLY HURT
Injury Received In Automobile Acci
dent Necessitates Amputation of
Right Arm.
^ , _..
Mr. Locke Sanders of Sidon, wa
seriously injured, a negro man was
badly hurt and a Willis Knight auto at
u y
mobile was wrecked when the car.
moune was wi . _. .
driven bv Mr .Will Hendricks of Si
driven uy mr .yyi
don, struck a heavy truck on e i
don gravel road several miles from
last night about 7 o clock.;
Mr . Sanders was badly hurt, it
was necessary to amputate his right
arm between the elbow and the shoul
der> th i s morning at the Kings' Dau
ghtcr8 Hospital . He also sustained
two broken ribs. Mr. Hendricks was
not in j ure d. The extent of the ne- j
groes injuries have not been ascer-; to
tained.
rp be acc i de rt occurred when Mr.
jj endr i cks attempted to pass thetruck
Qn tbe highway, and struck one side
of it The Willis-Knight car was p
h urled into a field and badly wrecked,
Tbe driver of the truck is unknown.,
VETPA F ATAI I V
N WlKU ï A1 ALL I
WOUNDS ANOTHER
j
o
!
j 0 b n Alexander Shoots Henry McGee
On Thé Plantation of Mr. H. E.
Williams.
1
Mr. H. E. Williams, in Beat Five on
Mossy Lake, when he was fired up
on by John Alexander. A dispute
had arisen between the two over some !
stock and the shooting resulted,
Henry was wounded in the abdomen i
and died a few hours later.
Alexander was arrested by the
county officers and is in jail.
-° ~
************* *
* *
* THE WEATHER * ,
* *
*\* *********** *
MISSISSIPPI—Cloudy tonight and
Wednesday, probably rain and colder
in north and central portion ; Colder
Wednesday; much colder in interior ;
and extreme north portion.
TEMPERATURE—Highest, 80 de
grees; lowest 50 degrees; at 7 a. m.
47 degrees; precipitation .60; river ^
gauge 23; rise in 24 hours 0.4. s
- 0
ShrillSpCCUll
. j p rp Tanlrcnn
V>aX AU J dLKSUll
j
j
vicinity have made arrangements for
j a special car to be attached to the
regular Jackson train next Thursday
to attend the Thanksgiving ceremon
ial of Wahabi Temple ta be held in
Jackson on that date. Quite a large
number from this section will attend
this ceremonial and on account of the
heavy passenger traffic on all trains
now, made arrangements for this spe
c ial car. This car will leave from
Clrksdale that morning and will ar
rive in Greenwood at 7:40 a. m. get
ting to Jackson at 12:!ÿ>.
Henry McGee, negro, was shot and
mortally wounded yesterday after-j
noon at 4 o'clock on the plantation °f

The Shriner's from Greenwood and;
CIRCUIT COURT
BEGINS WORK
Ferris Case Is Set For Thursday. A
Special Venire of 200 Men Have
Been Summoned.
. . . . . ,
A special venire of 200 men is be
ing summoned for Thursday morning
at 9 o clock when the case of the State
„ . , , ...
vs. C. A. Ferris charged with enm
. . ..
inal assault on Miss Thelma Wallace,, „
wi e ca e s * on
In the vase of the Stÿe v. John
Snntt and George Barber, charged.
«a ourglary anu larceny jpleas of
guilty were entered and John Smith j
was sent to the penitentiary for five
years and George Barber for two
years.
Lucius Thomas plead guilty to the
j charge of murder and was sentenced
to the penitentiary for life.
1° the case of the State vs. Percy
Catoe (Alias Percy Bilbo), and Julia
Weems, charged with having intoxi
eating liquors .in Their possession, a
p i ea of guilty was entered and they
were fined $100 and sentenced to
1
j serve 30 days in jail.
Samuel Manuel (alias Samuel John-: _
SSt," CÄ
The case of the State vs. Eli Me- ;
! Lain charged with grand larceny is j
being tried this afternoon.
,
o
UNDER NEW LAW
MEXICANS NOT
1
!
i
MEXICO CITY, Nov. 25—A new
municipal iaw forbids Mexicans
hold fiestas i n cemeteries over the,
graves of their grandmothers or other
relatives, as has been the annual prac
tice of the poorer people on All Souls',
, Day. This action has been taken at
the request of the church authorities.
For years one of the most popular
holidays in the long calender of such
da y S j n Mexico has been All Souls
Day w hi c h by such should be observed
; &s a so i emn occasion. The poor class
0 f native, however, had turned it into
a day%0 f hilarity and general rejoic
ing and it was n o uncommon thing to
^ find a happy group drinking pulque
s and singing songs over the grave of j
some dear and deceased relative.
The merry-making was stopped this
y ear by ordeI of the city countiL
in
ar
_
-Allowed To Hold Fiestas In Cemeter
ies Over Graves Of Their Grand
mothers Or Other Relatives.
Associated Press
to

■o
Undermining All
State Authority
Associated Press
Nov. 25—Archbishop
Faulhaber declared at a meeting of
Bavarian Catholics that the German
government, by separating church and
state, was undermining all state au-!
thority- He said amid great applause
that every believer had the right to
refusa to take the tax oath, since by
. it believers were not taking
the oath.
MUNICH,
X
lean
j of
;
PROMRT ACTION
MAY PREVENT WAR
l
to
to
Allies May Be Called Upon To Inter
fere In The Adriatic Situation
To Save Bloodshed.
. . , , _
, Associated Press
rF . vnA M T , P
GEN0A ' N °7 Monday)-Te!- ;
egrams received by the Serbian Bur
° J
eau at Berne from Belgrade, Zara and
„ ..
Spalto, convey the impression that
on ly prompt interference by the Al
Ue> can event , war over the Adria .
8ttOB{ion . Jugo Slave, which has
had the most patiencej jt js said> ls
j nQw reac iy to fight.
SITUATION CRITICAL
pARIg Nov 25—(Monday)— Dis- ;
-patches 'confirming Genoa reports
that fche gituation on the Easte rn
ghore ^ the Adriatic ig critical were
issued by the Jugo Slavo Bureau here.
The Bureau says the Jugo Slavo gov
ernment asked its ministers in Paris
and London and Washington to draw
the attention of the governments to
the dangerous situation, arising from
1 Dannunzio raids.
_ _ ÏW 1AT¥\TD TOOT
WARNING ISSUED
FOR COLD WAVE
O
a
,
;
j
WASHINGTON, Nov. 25 — Cold
wave warnings were issued today for
West Tennessee and extreme North
Mississippi, the norhtwest depression
of Monday, having extended from
Michigan to Texas, accompanied by
snow. The cold wave will be accom
, panied by a strong wind.
Lower Temperatures For Tennessee
And North Mississippi Are
Predicted.
Associated Press
*
* COTTON MARKETS
*
* *
at
to
of j
Dec.
j
0
**************
■X
*
*
********* vr**
NEW YORK COTTON MARKET
Prev
Open High Low Close C ose
- |37.15 37.60 37.05 37.43 36.98
- j35.95 36.56 35.90 36.11 35.73J
Mar. - - }34.25 34.6 0 34.10 34.25 33.93 ;
Closed 32 to 45 up.
New York Spots 39.45—40 up.
Dec.
Jan.
NEWHJRLEANS COTTON MARKET
Prev.
Open High Low Close C os j
_ ;
j38.00! 38.50;38.00;38.39 37.84|
Jan. - - ;36J>0 1 36.70;36.16;36.65 35.98;
Mar. - - I34.75j35.16!3 4.50j34.81;34.50i
Closed 31 to 55 up.
New Orleans Spots 38.75.
-o
Will Collect Most
q, . -j ii
ötriKing .L<eiter©j
- !
of PARIS, Nov. 25—The state is ask- «
e d, in a bill that has been introduced
in the French Senate, to collect some
au-! Q f the most striking letters written
by French soldiers during the war. j
to The purpose is to form a permanent ;
by record of every part of the'battle-!
front and every phase of the fight- j
ing. ' j
NO REPLY TO
MEXICAN NOTE
y
Cabinet Reaches No Decisions As To
The Mexican Situation—Condi
tions Discussed.
Associated Press
25—The
WASHINGTON,
Nov.
'cabipet reached no decision today on
the Mexican situation, according to
Secretary Lansing, who presided at
the regular weekly meeting . It is
stated no reply has yet been received
from the American note to the Mexi-' at
can government, demanding the im
mediate release of William O. Jen- if
kins, American Consular Agent at
at Puebla, who was arrested after his
release by kidnappers.
The note also gave a warning that;
further molestation of Jenkins, would j
seriously effect the relations between
j
Mexico's failure to make a prompt
reply has apparently created an un
I favorable impression in official circles.'-as
the United States and Mexico.
General cond'tions in Mexico were dis
cussed at today's cabinet meeting, in,
addition to the Jenkins case. i
I
-o
May Postpone The
Payment Interest
j
i
LONDON, Nov*. 25—Plan is under
discussion by the British and Ameri- ;
lean government under which payment j Q
j of the interest on the advances by
; Great Britian and the United States !
Associated Press
to the Allies in the course of the war
and advances by the United States
to Great Britain be postponed for !
three
Chamberlain, j
Chancellor Exchequer, announced in ;
the House of Commons today.
years, Austin
j
;
WASHINGTON, Nov. 25—Interest :
, . ._, _ ,
P a ^ men s on
; Allies, may be deferred until the |
war reaction passes it was said to
r +
dav at the treasury. Negotiations at
1
this end are now being conducted at
the request of the Allias,
PaHfifation State
raClIlCatlOn öldXe
;
INTEREST DEFERRED.
O
Morelos Reported
Associated Press
MEXICO CITY, Nov. 25—Complete
pacification of the state of Morelos by
the capture of seven self-termed
"generals" has been reported to the
War Department by General Pablo
Gonzales who is in charge of federal
southern
military operations in the
part of the republic. The capture of
the "generals" was effected at Huau
tla after these leaders with more than
a thousand men had been cornered in
, the hills for fifteen days. General
Gonzales stated that valuable arch
ives, dealing in detail with the ex
ploits of Emiliano Zapata before he!
was killed, were taken.
-o
I
. _ -
Are Being Employed
-
^f girls for domestic service in Pres
ton and Mid-Lancashire
where industrial employment
more remuneration, has resulted in
men house servants being employed
in considerable numbers. Many of
them are ex-service men,
Men House Servants
Associated Press
j PRESTON, Eng., Nov. 25—Scarcity
districts,
offers
o
Paid $80 For Picture;
Is Offered $120,000
*
BRUSSELS, Nov. 25—At an art
sale here an amateur collector bought
a picture for the equivalent of about
$80. Experts have examined it and
pronounce it a genuine Rembrandt for
which a Dutch museum has made an
offer of $120,000.
;
-o
Delays Settling
• Eastern Question
j ^
LONDON, Nqv. 25—President Wil
illness, says the Saturday Re
; view, contributes to the delay in the
se ttlement of the Eastern question.
,j, be paper a dds that "nothing can
be ^ unfortunate than this sus
son's
pension, as nothing is more import
ant for Britain than to know exactly
wher* we stand in regard to military
expenditures.
"Will the Americans agree to po
jj ce a portion of Asia Minor? Why
! should they? Were we an American
« influence, we should stoutly resist;
any such proposal! America has her
own troubles and difficulties in con- j
nection with democracy, just as Eng
j land ,has, and they are grave, mor*
; than enough to occupy her statesmen
and their resources of government,
j without taking up the Quixotic task
j of policing Armenia or the Caucasus."
Z%f5c
TRY TO AGREE
on wage scale
After Spending Tow Hours In C'n.tor
ence^ Fail To Break Deadlock
As To Miners Demands.
•P
Associated Press
WASHINGTON. Nov. 25—»
dent Wilson's cabinet is expect**«.
reach a decision today as to ti
controversy bc«.\*een the oilu...- w
coal miners and the operators that
would send the miners back to work
at once. Before entering the meet
ing; Attorney General Palmer said,
if the figures as to the operators
profits, given yesterday by former
Secretary of Treasury McAdoo,
ministrator Garfield would permit
j eased price for coal,
p. v
were
j correct, it is not likely that Fuel Ad
an
Any wage advance granted, it is
intimated, would have to come out of
the operators profits,
terday stated, the operators profits,
shown by the income tax returns of
showed earnings on capital
McAdoo yes
1017,
stock, ranging from 15 per cent to two
i thousand per cent.
The operators and miners spent two
I hours in conference today, without
breaking the deadlock as to wages.
CLOSING ADDITIONAL PLANTS
j CHICAGO, Nov. 25—The closing of
i additional manufacturing plants in
Middle West and other places, the
; further curtailment and the lessening
j Q f production
which have been worked since
! strike of the bituminous coal miners
more than three
,even in those mines
the
went into effect
wee ks ago, still continues today,
! the miners aw*ait the outcome of the
as
j miners and operators conference in
; Washington,
j One ray of hope, is the possibility
; that the whole difficulty may be sub
: mitted to President Wilson as a re
. , , vvuson as a re
of the cabmet discussion. The
| mdications are that factories and pub
he utilities are now oDeratimr at
uw °P erai,n g a v
reduced basis
Ieuuceu
a
The reduced distribution of coal in
the Pittsburg district, which caused
an order to be issued cutting off street
illumination, has been removed,
result of the crime which followed
the darkening of the streets.
as a
-O
Martial Law Exists
In A Spanish Town
Associated Press
SARAGOASA,
Spain,
Nov. 25—
(Monday)—Martial law has been de
clared here, because of the general
strike called in protest against the de
portation of the Labor Unions to Bar
celona.
-o
Against Artificial
Stimulation of Vice
Associated Press
I LONDON, Nov. 25—A protest aga
inst "artificial stimulation of vice"
was delivered by Miss J. E. Higson,
of the Archbishops' Cnetral Advisory
Council, at a meeting of a purity as
sociation here.
"How can you expect young people
to retain their ideals when, at mov
true love, but of unfaithful wives and
unmarried mothers?
ing picture shows and at plays, they
have stories, not of pure .faithful and
she asked.
Canon Frewer, of Brighton, said
this is the day of England's moral
cnsis:
No Likelihood Of
Universal Peace
-o
SYDNEY, Australia, Nov. 25— "I
see no likelihood just yet of univer
versai peace," said Lieutenant-Gener
Associated Press
a ISir Harry Shauvel on returning
from the war service in Turkey and
Until this is within sight
we must be prepared for war' he added
Sir Harry was the commander of the
Egypt.
famous Anzac Corps and leader of the
Horse and New
Australian Light
Zealand Mounted Rifles in Egypt and
Palestine.
-o
• , . XT' 4
Aluminum Factory
To Be Constructed
Associated Press
STRATFORD-ON-AVON, Nov. 25—
An aluminum factory is to be con
structed in this town, famous
Shakespeare's birthplace. A sugges
tion that its erection would constitute
j "tjie first step in the industrializa
£ion of the city" has been rejected up
Q n recommendations to Stratford
Council "that the anticipations of a
possible loss to the world's culture"
as a result were not such as could
justify a prohibitive order.
as

xml | txt