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Greenwood daily commonwealth. (Greenwood, Miss.) 1919-1926, November 28, 1919, Image 1

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MISSISSIPPI' S LIVEST LITT LE BIG NEWSPAPER.
' PUBLISHED EVERY AFTERNOON EXCEPT SUNDAY
GREENWOOD, LEFLORE COUNTY, MISSISSIPPI, FRIDAY AFTERNOON, NOVEMBJ . 28, 1919
-h
J. L. & S. GILLESPIE, Editors and Publishers
ASSOCIATED PRESS NEWS SERVICE
VOLUME 4—NUMBER 77
SUBSCRIPTION: "Kg? 6c
CALL NEW VENIRE
IN FERRIS CASE
One Hundred Men to Report Tomor- j
row Morning—Case May Go Into
Next Week.
Sheriff T. C. Garrott and his aides
the county this after
are scouring
noon in search of one hundred men,
drawn as a second special venire m
the Ferris case, to report .tomorrow j
morning; the Court is usy v* or _ in *f :
with the regular juries in an e or
to cull one or two meiT who can!
, . , , ,
qualify from that limited number and.
with the exception of eleven men who -
at noon occupied seats in the jury box !
the first special venire of two hun
dred men have gone their various
ways.
The effort to secure a jury to try
the case was begun shortly afternoon
Thursday. Predictions that a jury
could not be secured from the special
venire were heard Qn all sides. These
proved to be based on good logic as
the venire was exhausted at one j
d'clock this afternoon.
At ten o'clock Thursday night ten
, .... . ,
chairs in the jury box were filled. The
first thing this morning one man was
excused. At ten forty-five the box
was full, three men being accepted m
Vj» row aft f a A score f "T e i ad
loned. A minute later the state
J
had Hised four of its challenges and
the tediousas renewed. Both
sides have se^^^f challenges to the
not expected that
good yet and it
a jury will be secured .before all are
However, there was no ap
used up.
parent determination on the part of
either side this morning to force a
long drawn out fight over the jury.
Practically every man questioned hac 1
heard of the case and had formed an
i
opinion.
District Attorney Forman and Coun
ty Attorney Means Johnston are'be
ing assisted in the prosecution by
Hill and Witty while the defense is j
represented by the firms of Gard- 1
ner, McBee and Gardner, and Whit-j
tington and Osborn . |
The defendant Ferris, sat ^his |
morning surrounded by his attorneys.!
Tl w all outward appearance he was i
r a!*™ although on trial charged with
criminal assault, the penalty in which
case, if found guilty, is death. On his
right side sat a brother. On his left
sat M. Y. Aldridge, jointly indicted
with him, but who was granted a sev
eranfce when the men were arraigned
last Monday morning.
With the exception of the lawyers
and court attendants there was scar
cely a hundred other people in the
court room during the morning ses
These were all men except five
A deputy sheriff at the door examined
as the door was entered.

sion.
every one
It is understood that no trouble is
being looked for but that the search
ing of everyone is only a precaution
ary measure.
Unless a jury is secured early to
morrow the case which is attracting
so much interest throughout this sec
tion will probably extend over well in
to next week.
o
THE RUMANIAN
GOVERNMENT IS
Pre-Occupied With the Task of Ex
tending Its Administrative Fun
ctions To New Territory.
BUCHAREST, Nov. 28—The Rum
anian government is pre-ocoupiëd
with the task of extending its admin
istrative functions to the territory the
kingdom will acquire under the peace
treaty. With Transylvania, Bukovina
and a part of Bessarabia and the
Banat added to its domains, the coun
try will be called upon to meet with
many difficult problems treble in area
and numbers. It is regarded here as
not improbable that the next Ruman
ian cabinet will have in it a number
of representatives from > Transylvan
Indeed some see indications that
the next Prime Minister will be M.
Maniu, now President of the Execu
tive Council of Transylvania.
Queen Marie has often expressed a
wish that it might be possible to have
a few able Americans and English
to Rumania to act as fin
ia.
men come
and executive advisers to the
If we could induce
smart Americans to
government,
some of your
here and act Sr advisory capa
come
city to us," she said recently to a
' visiting American railroad man, "I
tMnk it would be a splendid thing.
* They could give us the benefit of
their exceptional training and exper-
ience and save as from a lot of mis-
- — n
V
t
-o-
aU the "apooners," male and
he arranged, like strikes
||||i

Sl
THE ITINERANT
MERCHANT IS IN
'
j Evidence In Every Nook and Corner !
of Mexico City—Population In
creased More Than 300,000.
Associated Press
^ ons j n t be republic which have
crowded a million p erso ns in Mexico
j City> Qr more than 3()0>()00 above its
: normal population, have greatly in-1
creased t be number of itinerant mer
MEXICO CITY, Nov. 28—Condi
chants who set up shop where their
whim wiHs . It is im p OSsib l e to find!
- street - n the cit where some ven - i
! ^ ^ not set ^ up a stalL A person 1
desiring to outfit a house can buy
almogt everything needed withou t
placing foot within a regular shop,
Let a prospective buyer merely hint
that he is in the market for something
and he is immediately besieged by a
crowd of energetic salesmen who dil- [
ate in machine-gun Spanish on the
worth of their wares.
j
Sunday is the busiest day for these
merchants.
They foregather princi
, pally in the plazas, spread hteir
goodg about them and patiently wait
for customera> Their „umbers are
au ted by men and women, boys
^ &n of them selling cand ies,
fruits, shoestrings, pottery, tobacco,
bright . colored ribbons> shoes, hats,
dogs, cats, gophers, and the dozens of j
varieties of food of which chili is the
most important component. The pla
zas present an animated appearance.
Bands are playing, whistles are blow
ing, newsboys call their editions,
man with a wheel of chance beseech
es the credulous to try their luck, a
boy with a huge basket balanced atop
J his head offers sweetmeats at five
following him
a
centavos each and
comes a seller of ice cream with his
i frozen dainties tucked away in a con
tained which he juggles perilously on
head b%t never loses a spoonful,
and shines a glorious sun which gives
hint of brooding problems of exist
j
1
| It is a happy life tW native leads
| Sunday wheT1 with a few centavos ,
^ ^ gtomach with swee ts, j
i * * „ sunshine and listen I
" as ia f^ rl ^hed b a Mexican band
, musl b . " t here is no better in any
; aI1 w
his
no
■ ence.
land.
United States,
A. man from the
who, on a recent
took a seat in a plaza, within a few
shined, his
Sunday morning
minutes had his shoes
nails manicured, his breakfast serv
ed, his morning newspapers delivered,
his measure taken for a suit of cloth
and was offered an assortment of
diamonds and opals at a bargain. He
concluded that there may be more
modern methods of conducting busi
but there certainly is none more
es
ness
picturesque than that employed by
the outdoor merchant.
-o
ADD GREENWICH
VILLAGE TO THE
Spots of "Atmosphere" That Are No
More—Old Residential District
Is About Extinct.
Associated Press
NEW YORK, Nov. 28—Add Green
wich Village to the spots of "atmos
Like the
pherd" that are no more.
Bowery and the old down town resi
dential district the Bohemia of the
metropolis is about extinct.
Unconventional people still reside in j
the vicinity of Washington Square j
but those who knew it in the. old days ;
call the present residents posers.
Struggling young geniuses, living j
in poverty in cheerless attics or sta- !
ble studious no more evade' insistent}
landladies by the back stairway. They j
don't because the same attics and}
stables now lease for anywhere from}
$1,500 to $3,600 a year, security de-j
manded. The Bohemian restaurants!
_j commercialized. There is no
dit and prices range with eating pla-j
j
cre
are
ces in the White Light district.
In MacDougal Alléy and Washing
ton Mews where men and women once
sacrificed all bodily comforts for art.
limousines and town cars now stand
without. Nurses care for children. >
Fresh paint and modern conveniences;having
are everywhere. Only geniuses who
have arrived can now'afford a resi
dence in New York's Bohemia.
■o
Want A Women's
Fighting- Battalion
Associated Press
TOKIO, Nov. 28— A Tokio newspa-
per prints an advertisement from a
Bn W ifii woman here dedaring that
owing to the indifference of the young
men to their duty she desires to or-
ganise a "women's fighting battalion"
to join the Sfbermn
> V
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4 2
DEATH CALLED
MR. W.W. MCNEILL
One Of City's Most Substantial Citi
zens Passed Away In Meridian
Sanitarium.
. .
ths h ^s been m Meridian, where he
was takm & treatment.
Mr - McNeill was born in Montgom
ery count y> Mississippi, and was rear
ed there. He came to Greenwood when
Mr. W. W. McNeill, one of Green
wood's best citizens, died last night
at the Tucker Sanitarium in Meri
dian, after a prolonged illness. Mr.
McNeill had been in failing health
for several years and for many mon
this county was still a part of Carroll
county. In 1875 he held the position of
alderman here and has always been
actively associated with the business
interests of the town. When first
coming to this city he held a position
with Capt. L. T. Baskett. In 1883, the
year he was married to Miss Annie
Jones, he went into the mercantile
business for himself and remained in
same until 1900 when he was forced
to retire from his active duties on
account of failing health.
Mr. McNeill was one of the best
known residents of this section. Few
men had as many friends as he. For
years he had been a member of the
Methodist church öf Greenwood and
was a noble Christian gentleman. He
was also a member of the Knights of
Pythias Lodge.
A widow, and two daughters sur
vive Mr. McNeill, Mrs. W. D. McLeod
and Mrs. E. O. Simmons, of Green
wood.
The remains will reach this city to
night at 8:30 o'clock by tfte way of
Jacksoh. The funeral will be held Sat
urday morning at 10:30 o'clock at the
family residence, 309 East Washing
ton Street, conducted by Rev. J. A.
Hall. Interment will be made in the
Warner Wells, John Brogan and O. L.
Kimbrough; Honorary: Dr. T. R. Hen
derson, W. R. Bell, Judge A. McC.
I. O. O. Cemetery.
The pall-bearers will be: Active,
Messrs. W. L. Ray, Lloyd DeLoach,
G. A. Wade, W. L .Craig, A. Peteet,
Kimbrough, Gid Montjoy, Sr., J. T.
Flanagän, C. E. Wright, Walter Pil
] ow and J. E. Mann,
raids for arms continue.
case has -occurred in County Kerry
o
y
Sinn Fein Raids
For Arms Continue
DUBLIN ,Nov .28—The Sinn Fein
A notable
where a sportsman going out for a
daÿ's shooting was held up by men
with revolvers and his gun had cart
ridges taken, the raiders stating that
their action was a protest against his
accepted a permit to shoot
from the English Government,
In Clare a farmer, who was on his
way to mass at Cooraclare with his
daughter, was held up by ten masked
men and made to deliver' up two guns
and revolvers . What he was doing
with these on the way to mass is not
revealed in' the accounts received.
-o-
The country^ at large will overlook
the incident, but Senator Gore will
take note with rather keen interest
that an Oklahoma Congressional dis-
trict baa nominated by an overwhelm-
ing vote a candidate who baaed his
canvass on support of the League of
NatiMis.
ÄI
ms?

-,
TO SELL BONDS
FOR GIRIB HOME
Mrs. W. R. Humphrey And Committee
Will Commence Campaign On
Next Tuesday."
terest with maturity a definite date
and will be retired as soon as pos
sible.
a
Mrs. W. R. Humphrey, trustee for ■
! the building committee, who is endea
voring to raise funds for the building
| of club rooms and a home for the bus
iness women of Greenwood, will com
mence the sale of bonds on next Tues
day. The bonds will be issued through
a lien on the property, bearing in
!
Mrs. Humphrey and her committee
to assist in the sale of the bonds will
pass on all plans and specifications
of the building.
The plan is to have the $50,000
worth of bonds sold by Christmas and
the erection of the home will be star
ted as soon as possible. At least for
ty rooms will be included in tlfe build
ing, with hot and cold baths ,a kitch
enette, dining room, parlors and a
first class restaurant.
Mrs. M. L. Turnage, president of
the club, and a committee which she
appointed to assist her, will solicit
contributions to aid in the furnishing
of the club rooms.
«
*
*
-O*
FOOTBALL GAME
RESULTED IN TIE
I
é/r
After Hard Fought Contest, Neither
Team Could Win a Victory—Big
Crowd Present.
One of the most exciting football
games ever played in Greenwood was
staged yesterday, Thanskgiving, when
the Winona High School team met the
Greenwood Highs and the hard fought
contest resulted in a tied score of
0 to 0.
A crowd, said to be the largest that
has ever attended a local school game,
was present. It is estimated that one
thousand persons witnessed the game.
Greenwood was outweighted about
twenty pounds to the man, but despite
this handicap they swept their oppo
nents off their feet and keep the fight
in the Winona territory during the
greater part of the game. Greenwood
was penalized 85 yards to the oppos
ing team five yards.
Charley Abbott and Evan Fuller did
splendid defensive work, while Louie
Orlansky and Howell Peel featured in
offensive mandeuvers.
The local high school is planning to
make the game with Winona an an
nual affair to take place each Thanks
giving Day.
TEMPERATURE—Highest, 60 de
grees; lowest, 58 degrees; at 7 a. m.
42 degrees; precipitation 1.67; river
gauge 2M; change 24 tan, none.
o
«Sk************
*
*
THE WEATHER *
*
*
4 c * *<* *4c********
MISSISSIPPI—Local, rains and
colder Friday; Saturday probably
rain; colder in the south portion; mo-
derate northeast winds .
s- fe y I,
ULTIMATUM MAY
BE SENT MEXICO
U. S. Government Has No Intention
Of Receding Its Posituih In Re
gard To Jenkins Affair.
Associated Press
WASHINGTON, Nov. 28—Althou
gh further investigation will be made,
the American government has no in
tention of receding its position in the
Jenkins case, administration officials
declared today. The government, they
said, is prepared for the next step,
which may take the form of an ulti
matum to the Mexican government.
-o
«
■5C
* COTTON MARKETS*
*
*
**************
NEW YORK COTTON MARKET
Prev
Open High Low Close C ose
37.00 37.70j36.63l37.65 37.40
35.85 36.04 35.50 36.00 36.18
33.75 34.08 33.34 33.88 34.151
Closed 25 up to 27 dowm.
New York Spots 39.45—unchanged.
NEW* ORLEANS COTTON MARKET
Prev.
Open High Low Close C!os
Dec. - - 138.02138740137.60 ^8^00 |38 jÖ 2 j
Jan. - - 36.15 36.35;35.70 36.12 ! 36.40l j
Mar. - - j34.25 34.56 33.75 34.30 34.57
, gZ 7 — OQ , —-*-- .
XT OSe <~» i ° ~ o TLnn u
New Orleans Spots 39.00—unchang
Dec. -
Jan. -
Mar. -
!
ed.
o
GREENWOOD COTTON RECEIPTS.
1918-19 receipts .
1917*18 receipts .
Since Sept. 1, 1919, .
Same date last year ...
Weed ending Nov. 27,
Same week last year
Stock on hand now.
Same date last year ..
160,064
133,197
80,392
95 979 !
*6209
7*179 Î
34 279
43 690
j
!
-o
A A/''U /Yü
l*. lu®lvFII/ J. xiaHj A/Jl
CHORUS GIRLS
In England, According To Some Of
The Theatrical Agents And Stage
Managers.
Associated Press
LONDON, Nov. 28— England is ex
periencing a shortage of chorus girls,
according to some theatrical agents,
and stage managers. Plenty of young
women are still anxious to get into
the lime-light, but experienced girls
are said to be far less plentiful than
they were. One theatrical agent has
explained the situation thus:
During the war a large number
of chorus girls ,show girls, and "small
part ladies' left the stage for other
work. Some are remaining in it per
manently; others have not yet come
back to the theater.
Many girls, too, were married to
officers, during the war, and have now
no need or inclination to go back to
the stage. The lack of first-class
show girls for the provincial panto
mimes is becoming particularly acute.
It is almost impossible to get them
to go out of London. Even salaries
of four pounds are not tempting
i «
«
than." ?
■W
/
TROOPS CLASHED
IN MEXICO CITY
Fighting ■ Occurrs Between Factions
Dominated By Carranza and Gen
eral Obregon.
Associated Press
SAN ANTONIO,
Tex., Nov. 28—
j Fighting in Mexico City between the
j factions dominated by President Car
! ranza and General Alvaro Obregon is
j reported in advices froip the border
today. Carranza is reported to have
fled to Queretaro for safety. Obre
; gon recently resigned, after announc
I ing his candidacy for president. Gen
eral Pablo Gonzales, who is reported
i at the head of the Carranza forces, is
also regarded as a potential presiden
; tial candidate.
WASHINGTON, Nov. 28—Reports
j that the Carranza and Obregon forces
BREAK IS NOT SURPRISE.
had clashed in Mexico City has not 1
caused surprise in official Washing
ton. It is said however, that if the
report is true, the break had occurred j
a little earlier than expected.
The Mexican reply to the American
demand for release of Jenkins, charg
es Jenkins made contradictory state
ments to the trial judge. This will be
investigated immediately by the em
bassy at Mexico City.
1 I
o
A SISTER OF THE
PATRIARCH OF THE
is a
She is The Lady Surma di Bith
Mar Shimun, sister of the ruling
Patriarch of the Assyrans, the pres
ent day remnant of the once power
ful nomadic tribes which inhabited
Mesopotamia before the incursions
of the Arabs. The country whence !
she comes has been identified by some
Travelling by steamer ,by train and!
on horseback, she has come altogeth
Assyrians, The Present Day Remnant
Of The Once Powerful Nomadic
Tribes Of Mesopotamia.
Associated Press
LONDON, Nov. 28—There
woman in London around whose story
the minstrels of old would have wo
ven many a ballad, says the Daily
News.
with the Garden of Eden.
j
j vivin S 22 ' 000 of her P e °P le have b een ,
£ athered together at Bakuba, where
. they are living under the protection
the British civil and military auth
Qrities
er some 8,000 miles from a town 500 j
miles beyond Bagdad to plead, as the;
agent of her people, for the restora
tioli of lands lost by them when they
took arms in behalf of the Allies
against the Turks and Kurds.
Driven further and further into
their mountain fastnesses by repeat
! ed invasions and massacres, the sur
"I came to England much aganist
my will," said The Lady Sui*ma who
speaks English perfectly,
never been to Enrope before,
there was no one else to come. My
brother, the late ruling Patriarch,
I have
But
!
was billed by Kurd treachery; my
Î younger brother, who succeeds him, is
and an °tl ier brother is serving the
P eo Pl e w b° would trust nobody else.
"It may seem strange to you that a
j woman should be chosen for such a
! difficult task, but it has been the tra
dition of our nation that the sister
of the heir should take the vow of
celibacy and act as her brother's help -1
er during his reign.
The territory for which she is
pleading with the British government
is the oldest known to historians. It
lies south of the Caucasus and north
of the Euphrates and is the scene of
many incidents in the Old Testament
story. The life of the people who
have been Christians since the days
of the earliest teachers, has been one
long story of persecution, culfinating
in their- flight over the mountains in
1917-18.
i'Our villages were razed behind
sadly said The Lady Surma, all j
flbcks have been driven away,!
US,
our
our people stolen and exhausted, our
flocks have been driven away, our ;
money stolen and exhausted, our
documents burned. We are a people
without a country.*'
Will Make Effort
Get Equal Settlement
Associated Press
LONDON, Nov. 28—Great Britain
has given Jugo Slavia assurances that
the Adriatic question will soon be tak-
en up by the Supreme Council and
Great Britain's influence will be used
to secure the equal settlement, ac-
cording to dispatches.
tl
DECIDE SEIZE
THE COAL MINES
v
Goverr.mcnt Will Also Use Troops
To Protect Those Who Will Work
Drastic Steps Planned.
Associated Press
WASHINGTON, Nov. 28—The sei
zure of the bituminous coal
w'here the owners have not shown dis
position to co-operate for increasing
the production, and the use of troops
to protect the miners who desire to
work, was decided upon by the gov
ernment in an effort to end the coal
strike, it was stated officially today,
In the mines seized by the
ment, fourteen per cent of the wage
advance, agreed upon by the cabinet,
mines,
govern
will be put into effect, it is said.
It is said there is no general plan
for the government control of the
mines and each individual case will
he decided on its merits.
DRASTIC STEPS BE TAKEN.
1
WASHINGTON, Nov. 28—With the
wage negotiations conference dis
j banded, without having accomplished
anything further than bring down
the heads of the government criticism
from the miners and operators alike.
Officials of both the miners and oper
ators organizations have professed an
inability today to forecast what the
next forty eight hours will bring
forth. Both admitted they are await
ing the government's next move. In
official circles, views were expressed
that only drastic action would be pos
I sible.
on
The conference disbanded late yes
terday afternoon, after the
representatives had rejected Fuel Ad
ministrator Garfield's proposition of
a fourteen per cent wage increase.
FUEL SITUATION CRITICAL.
CHICAGO, Nov. 28—Cold weather,
with snow and sleet in the Middle
West and South west, has rendered
the fuel situation more critical today,
with the coal shortage acute in a
number of small cities and .towns. A
moderation of the cold wave is pre
dicted by tomorrow the forecasts
state.
However, in Illinois, Indiana, Ohio,
Pennsylvania and West Virginia, the
miners are apparently firm in their
determination not to return to work
until a wage agreement is reached,
Governor Allen of Kansas, is calling
for volunteers to work in the mines.
Governor Gardner of Missouri,
! nounces he will call a conference of
the governors unless the government
acts today. In Kànsas City, Mo., the
schools and theatres have been closed,
miners
an
-o
, . _ . , , . ,
-ons of docks, dredges and tugs
s an °ttset to Germany s warships
GUn ^ a t Scape Flow. It is indicated
Germany will stand pat on her propo
sition to refer disputes to the Hague
Tribunal. It is
should not be held responsible for the
acts of the marine forces at Scape.
Ccrittciny Ref IISCS
TA J f-i
UCITläriCl Ol EllldltC
Associated Press
BERLIN, Nov. 28—It is stated in
authoritative quarters that Germany
will not comply with the demand of
the Entente for four hundred thous
claimed Germany
count Astor, has been elected to Par
liament room, Sutton Division of Ply
o
Thanksgiving Was
Quietly Observed
Thanksgiving was quietly observed
in Greenwood yesterday. Practically
all of the business houses remained
closed throughout the day.
The annual union Thanksgiving
vice was held at the Presbyterian
Church at 10 o'clock and a good siz
ed crowd was in attendance. Dr. W.
C. Tyree, pastor of the Baptist
Church, delivered an excellent Than
ksgiving sermon. Miss Jane Casey
rendered a pleasing solo.
ser
o
Lady Astor Elected
To The Parliament
Associated Press
PLYMOUTH, Nov. 28—Lady Ast
or, the American born wife of Vis
mouth, in the balloting November
15th, as a result of the voting annouJL
ced today. jr
-o
Planning Agains
The Denal
ogs
Associai
'ess
-London is plan-
I against the dense
il times each winter
! with street traffic
jy traffic accidents. Men
III frog-penetrating lamps
Stationed at points about
mere traffic is most con-
LONDON, No'
mng new m<
fogs which .
seriously im
and caui
equip]
are
tl
/

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