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Greenwood daily commonwealth. (Greenwood, Miss.) 1919-1926, November 28, 1919, Image 2

Image and text provided by Mississippi Department of Archives and History

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87065131/1919-11-28/ed-1/seq-2/

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ÈVERY AFTERNOON
_
I
Eniered at Greenwood postoffice as second-class matte*. i n g
is
AFTERNOON ASSOCIATED PRESS SERVICE. j
view
Year, life
than
- who
good
aso for republication of all news dispatches credited to it auc
or not otherwise credited in this paper and also the local
All rights of republication of special dispatches for
the
to
The amusing story is told of Lafayette that
when he shook hands with a lot of people in Pitts- der
burgh in 1824 he asked of a man in the line:
"Are you married?" On receiving an affirmative
answer the distinguished Frenchman commented :
The Greenwood Daily Commonwealth
J. L. & S. GILLESPIE, Editors and Publishers.
TELEPHONE NO. 33.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES (By Mail or Carrier)
$6.0(1 a
50 Cents a Month.
Single Copy 6 Cents.
15 Cents a Week.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS.
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to tne
news publications herein.
herein are also reserved.
"Happy fellow." The next man in the line hav- gi
ing confessed that he was a bachelor, "Lucky
" whispered tactful Lafayette. | old
A former German Vice-Chancellor has been
fined 300 marks for refusing to answer a question f
put to him by a committee of the National As
sembly. Few secrets will be dragged to light at
that rate, for the German mark, worth about 25
cents in 1914, is now down to a fraction over 2
dog
■O
cents.
o
"If the United States does not desire to share,
in this great international effort" (the League of
Nations), says Lord Robert Cecil, "we must go on,
and the burden will be the greater upon us and
The Senate majority is not the
« a
other nations.
United States and the latter has not finally spok
en.
a
It was widely reported that the negroes of the
3G8th regiment showed lack of courage in the Ar
gonne and the negro officers were unequal to their
responsibilities, but according to Secretary Bak
er's report searching inquiry has found no basis
for such charges.
house in Norfolk, Va-, may have concluded that! s
the best way to beat the high cost of living is to j
follow the example of hibernating animals.
-o
The sailor who slept for 51 days under a
!
j
Union of Russian Workers without a God, with
out a master, and free of authority.
o
Senator Sherman's alleged boast that he nev
er prayed in his life calls to mind the ideal of the
?!
!
!
!
lace once owned by the mother of Peter the Great j
is to be auctioned in London, and the trinket is:
■o
Chance for a war-mjade plute—a pearl neck
only valued at a million and a quarter.
-o
The attitude of Congress may be stated in a
nutshell: Oh, yes, we knew the pressing need
for certain legislation, but we needed a holiday;
also our mileage.
Seattle may keep and welcome its physical:
marvel, who regularly breakfasts on a quart of :
cold water, but most of us will continue to prefer,
ham and— ;
)
Doc Garfield says the public must have coal
at a price that is not excessive- Well, if it gets
it, it will be more than it has done for several
i
-o
-o
years.
O
Industrial puzzles—the coal strike was called
off without ending it, while the steel strike has!
practically ended without being called off.
!
I
-o
Believing in keeping everlastingly at it, Woody |
has called another industrial conference—to have
only 17 members and to meet Dec. 1.
!
,
These highbrows who continuously write ot
the apathy of the American people merely prove
they are not in touch with them. j
. .
slightest degree bettering conditions, is the rec
ord stripped of camouflage.
, ,
One Ohio town is sure to be dryer—revenue ;
officers seized $200,000 worth of whisky m Bucy
-O
o
Six months of solid jawing without in the
o
)
;
rus the other day.
o
England still clings to the old idea that the ;
best way to satisfy the Irish is to keep 'em scrap-;
pir.g with each other;
o
A new and popular brand of union—that of
the newspaper web pressmen, which bars strikes
and walkouts.
o
To China, life is just one doggoned loss after
another—it has just lost the $30,000,000 loan it
\ so badly needs.
>
o
Anybody with anything to be proud of in the
Months work of Congress should get under
light. •
si:
the
o
Thotw
America^
bought foi
Willie Hear!
string' of news]
the Carnegie Institute figures a male)
Wth $4,720, some here abouts can bei
ül believes that the longer his
\ihe better his chance to be
■o
. ■ ;Ä
news,
r •:
, - ,
•<
; of the
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'
rmSÈt
M
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tSZLBi
Preachers of the simple life were never more
needed than now when a dollar has the purchas-j tons
i n g power of only about fifty cents and the world
is filled with unrest and discontent. Best for the sists
j nner man a i wa ys, the simple life may now be re- of
garded as a paying investment from the point of
view of the outer man's pocket. And the simple the
life is more closely allied with the life of service
than might be supposed, for the useful man is he
who labors with a contented mind and does more
good work for that reason. |
Mr. John D. Rockefeller, Jr. once surprised an
auc |ience Q f negroes by saying that to be a good jg
waiter or a good coo k or a good carpenter is to i s
follow the teachings of Christ. This is quite true,
for tbe Scriptures make it altogether clear that
the law of life is service, that true success or truly 0 f
to live well is to perform the duties of one's office,
whatever it may be, honestly and faithfully in or-j The
der to be of real use in the world. Of course agi
tators of the "Red" variety and the unhappy vie
0 f social unrest would sneer at this as plat-j
itudinous advice to the simple-minded to be in- ;
THE SIMPLE LIFE.
gi or i ous i y contented in the station in life to which w
they have been "called," describing it as the same
| old tale that has been told by the European upper
classes to the European lower classes during many j
generations. But they unwisely disregard the
f act that there is apt to be more genuine happi- G
ness j n moderate circumstances and in obscurity
than am0 ng those seeking mpney, position and
power a t all costs. To a graduating class of the
Army Medical School a speaker, wise through il
luminating experience, said pointedly:
I beseech you, young men, do not envy
for fine houses and our worldly success.
<<
I
I
!
! is
j
US
Yours is the better part- You will never
know the fierce competition of modern life,
in which the weaker is thrust to the wall;
the petty desire for notoriety, the ignoble
straining after money and social distinction.
'To be content with small means,' as Steven
puts it, to realize that 'it is better to toil
hopefully than to arrive'—is not this the true
philosophy of life? I wish that I could make
feel how much sweeter and manlier and
son
you
more helpful you can make your lives, how
much more of a benediction to others than
can we who are handicapped by our artificial
19
environment.
This applies not only to the young army phy
s i c j an but to the great mass of men and women
to j wbo ( j Q the bulk of the world's work and who
a
a
sometimes-sigh for riches or the harsh glare of
! limelight, failing to perceive that the simple and
harsh life really has more to offer. The present
j widespread unrest is very largely due to lack of
con t en tment i n moderate circumstances, although
! moderate circumstances as a rule are the most)
! productive of both real happiness and of moral |
! strength. Solomon in his book of proverbs tells j
j ^ & man wb o was w j se en ough to pray :
is:
a
Give me
neither poverty nor riches ; feed me with food con- j
venient for me, lest I be full and deny Thee, and j
say, Who is the Lord? Or lest I be poor and)
steal, and take the name of my God in vain.
a
99
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A "SPORT" THOUGH A ' DRY.
The popular idea of a "dry" among "wets" is j
that he ig a SO urlvisaged tyrant eager to tread;
of : ( j own ^be freedom as well as the rights of others
an( j ^b a t there is absolutely nothing of the good
; sport in his makeup, for a good sport is willing
) to live and let live, good-humoredly takes things
ag ^bey come, and can cheerfully endure even a
p rac ^j ca j joke at his own expense. Most "wets"
wm there fore be surprised to learn that "Pussy
foot" Johnston has been saluted as a "game sport"
by the wettest of Britishers, who, after mobbing
him, have now decided to give him a dinner as
i well as a respectful hearing—all because he
has!
proved himself to be "a game sport," than which
! nothing is so sure of British admiration.
I When Johnson, the American prohibition
mobbed at one. of his London
|
campaigner, was
! meetings, something struck him in the eye and!
, his eyeball was ruptured. Instead of raging and ;
ot denouncing, he treated the whole affair as a joke!
and gQod hum0 redly said he bore the rough crowd
j ( mos tly college boys) no ill will. In consequence
he became the most talked of man in London and
the Lord Chancellor referred to the incident in a
rec- public SFee ch. As for the college boys concerned,
they announce that as soon as
of the hospital they will give him a dinner as a
; mark Qf regpect as well ag by way of ato nement.
the
Pussyfoot" is out
<<
The British thought "Pussyfoot" was only a med
) ling prohibitionist, but finding to their surprise
; that he is a "game sport" they like him.
the ;
-o
At last Ludendorff has said something all Am
ericans can O. K.—that Count von Bernstorff is a
liar.
of
o
Ransomed Jenkins' rep would be in a bad way
if everybody didn't know Mexicans to be chronic
liars. k
it
■o
Denmark claims to have the world's best but
ter makers, but we have the highest butter pr'ces.
the
-O
Owing to the high cost of man-catching, di
vorces threaten to strike for increased alimony.
o
male)
bei pi e right if the Huns should renew the war.
Awful as if would be, 'twould serve some peo
■o
John Bull has the same' old working motto—
his "Grab what you want ; then argue.
be
»
o
The august Senate has had its say, but the
lowly people have not yet had theirs.
the
o
do
'
:
Mi
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■aT*
:
GRUBSTAKING THE REDS.
In the round up of the 'Reds' it was found that .
tons of radical literature are circulated in this
country. The literature in many languages con
sists not only of parriphlets, such as the address try
of Lenine urging the workingmen of the United
States to set up a communitic government like! of
the Bolshevist of Russia, but of more than 400 \
radical journals which circulate widely not onlyj
among the foreign-born but among negroes and j
other discontented elements- An important fact;
brought to light is that this radical and seditious
literature, though paid for in part by foreign gold,
jg largely supported by our native "parlor social
i s ts" and "boudoir Bolshevists" of wealth, a large
element being contemptuously described by
John Reed, the communist agitator, as "women
0 f wea lth with nothing to do and little in their
heads but plenty of money for a radical cause." i
The supporters of this literature are described byj
Deputy State Attorney of New York as persons 1
who "were pro-German and at all times at the
back of all sorts of disloyal movements." j
;
The Reds are rounded up for deportation, but;
w liat i s to be done about those who furnished the
rnoney> the pro-Germans, parlor socialists, bou- j
doir Bolshevists and women with more money !
j than brains ? For these people have substantially •
aided and egged on the compaign to undermine)
G ur industrial and governmental structure. Who I
are the more to be feared ,those who dig to un- j
dermine or those who grubstake the diggers? If!
the movement is to be checked, the grubstakers |
mus t be dealt with as well as the diggers.
■o
LITERARY JUNK.
Under the above caption the Kosciusko Star-1
I Ledger, progressive, public spirited, patriotic and,
considerate, says:
There are thousands of tons of literary stuff
flooding the mails to reach the newspapers of the
country whereby some enterprise more or less
meritorious is seeking a lot of free advertising j
I through the press. In view of the high cost of
paper, it should be stopped, because it is a phy- j
Isical impossibility for the average editor to read)
! the stuff much less publish it. The editor s space
! is his living and he always subscribes to the limit j
j for every worthy cause, and then to demand of
him free access to his advertising columns is just
little too much; in fact, it is an outrage. The
result is, the junk goes into the waste basket un
read. It is true the average newspaper man is
long suffering and it is also true that he is usually
poor and unless he is careful he will have to quit
business.
ii
a
of
of
19
-o
Yea, brethren, the greatest power in the Sen
ate is partisan politics
|
j
o
Another new one—the lemon extract jag.
-o
Velvet glove-handling may easily be overdone.
j
j
and)
-o
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FOR SURE
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RESULTS
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Use The
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DAILY COMMONWEALTH
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WANT ADS
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I****** ************
; (§)
®
^
A SERVICEABLE GIFTS
® A GIFT THATiWILL. SERVE THE WHOLE FAMILY
m/n
8
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V
(§) The CORONA, the best little typewriter in the world, is a Christmas gift that can be used by the whole (g)
^) family for years, and for years. It will serve mother during the day with her houshold orders, social (§)
(gv and personal correspondence. A CORONA will be the very thing for father in the evening and he will (g)
JgjJ not have to go back to the offièe to write his letters The'CORONA will serve the children well in their ^
studies and enable them to not begin early the use of the 1 typewriter but allow them to "bring up" —
© their written lessons in the neatest possible form.
® The price of the CORONA is $50.00, which includes neat travelling case. Terms to responsible parties. JS
)on't wait to place your order for if you wait you will not be able to get it for we are district agents V§
(Q ) 1 for njiM» counties and they are usually sold faster than we can get them.
(©)
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©
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GREENWOOD, MISS.
I
■ -
THE NEW POETRY.
. That row at the Contemporary Club in Phila
delphia will give the "new poetry" the advertise
ment it has ever had and induce people to read or
try to read it who otherwise would have side
stepped such intellectual labor. Miss Amy Lowell
of Boston, sister of the president of Harvard, a
woman of position, means and brains, is the high
priestess of the new poetry's fame. Not content
with adorning the magazines with her "vers libre
(free verse), she goes about preaching to literary
circles that the poetry of the past was a sad mis
take and that the new article which she writes
and stands for is the only genuine thing. At the
Contemporary Club in Philadelphia, where she :
recently appeared, her view was questioned with !
more or less heat. Some of the criticism she en- j
countered there was perfectly courteous and some
i of it wasn't. So Miss Lowell, who appears to be ;
liberally endowed with "temperament," burst into[
1 tears, intimated that many in her audience didn't !
"know any better" and departed in "high dud-j
j geon.
it
99
99
Miss L'owell is said to describe herself as a
past mistress in the art of throwing hand gren- :
j ades among sleepy old ladies. In other words, the
! new poetry is startling enough to make the rut-1
• worn mind sit up and take notice. It discards not j
only rhyme but rhythm, being nothing but prosei
I strung along in lines of irregular length. But it is
j extraordinary prose ,aimed to startle by its dis-1
connected imagery. Obviously it is an exaggera
| tion of the Walt Whitman idea, and undoubtedly )
after its little hour of flag waving and shouting,
it will go the way of other forgotten literary fads. |
•o

costliest cracked brain,
!
j If it > g t be a red Christmas, by all means let
furnish the color.
j _
giving enjoyment.
j _
As a booster of legal business, the Senate's a!**
} lum ciinger.
is
The Prince wins New York," says a headline. )
Who from?
a
o
Red Bill will go down in history as the world's
■O
o
I
Coalless plants are not conducive to Thanks
o
-o
Washington correspondents were poor treatv
guessers.
o
The Senate does not care a hoot about treaty
preparedness.
N -
JL
o
They can knock out Tommy Marshall's rulings,
but not his smile.
o
Not a gunman in the Senate, yet as a body
lit is a killer.
-o
Wall street has a strong prejudice against out
I side crooks.
«
-o
Artists now envy the pay envelope of house
*
* I painters.
* i
■O
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No 8-hour law for the stormy petrels of pol-'
*
itics .
i
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Or
*
The less they know the louder they usually
*
talk.
*
<y
*
Even the most flippant no longer call a strike
*
a joke.
*
■O
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A world-wide scapegoat—old H. C. L.

-o
Too many poison tongues a-wagging.
*
*
■o
Big season for fruitless conferences.
cutg ^ burns> bruises, sore throat and
croup, it has been found most effec
tive. Accept no substitute. This
great oil is golden red color only,
: ^^^anteed^ 30 c 60c ^'nd^i oo
! e
j gists>
;
!
MiBcr's Antiseptic Oil, Known as
. SNAKE OIL
Will Limber You Up—A New Crea
tion, Pain Killer and Antisep
tic Combined.
For rheumatism, neuralgia, lum
bago, stiff and swollen joints, corns,
bunions or whatever the pain may be,
it is said to be without an equal. For
or money refunded by leading drug
6 .
For Sale by All Druggists.
(Adv)
-o
1
V
Mme. Schumann-Heink
World's Greatest Contralto
■ Grand Opera House. Greenville.
1
I
:
Prices: -$3.50, $3.oo. $2.50, $1.50 ■
j
dis-1
)
Wednesday, Dec. 3rd.
I
(Plus War Tax)
Seats |on sale now at Happy
Thought Shop, 111 S. Poplar St.
Mail Orders Filled Now.
I
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For ALL Cars
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TIMKEN
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PHONE No.984-W
JFojr*
SoreThroat
Rub the chest vigorous
ly with Yel-O-Ptne
Croup and Pneumonia
Salve, then saturate a
piece of flannel with
the Salve. Warm it be
fore the fire and press
it firmly over the chest
and throat.
Take a chunk el the salve about
tke size of a pea and spread it
inside tke tkroat. If tke esse is
obstinate melt a bit in a spoon and
breathe it through the mouth and
nose. The nest morning the head,
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and the soreness gone. Ask your
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A
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