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Greenwood daily commonwealth. (Greenwood, Miss.) 1919-1926, December 01, 1919, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87065131/1919-12-01/ed-1/seq-2/

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The Greenwood Daily Commonwealth
J. L. & S. GILLESPIE, Editors and Publishers.
j
;
AFTERNOON ASSOCIATED PRESS SERVICE,
. MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS.
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to tne
use for republication of all news dispatches credited to it*
or not otherwise credited in this paper and also the local
All rights of republication of special dispatches
Some way should be found to dodge legal hold
ups and expedite the deportation of the anarchist
who dared to openly threaten the chairman of the
I
tt , TT , ^ ,
Hcr :, S ^ ls guy, of Australia under
the spotlight again, to declare Germany the best
organized nation for the commercial war that is
Entered at Greenwood postoffice as second-class matter.
TELEPHONE NO. 33.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES (By Mail or Carrier)
15 Cents a Week. 50 Cents a Month. $6.00 a Year.
Single Copy 5 Cent*.
news publications herein.
herein are also reserved.
House Immigration committee.
<y
The Connecticut ex-saloon keeper who paid
$2,000 in real money for a machine to print $20
bills is probably convinced that the other crook's
game cannot be beaten.
-o
to be.
-o
Senator Lodge may be thankful he isn't run
ning a paper in Chicago, where an editor was fin
ed $100 for pulling off a joke on the President.
-o
Thirsty Congressman will be "cussing" mad
when they return to Washington and find that
bootleg stuff has been boosted to $15 a quart.
What's the matter with Pittshiire- iiiries? One
of them actually found three New York financiers
guilty of wrecking a local trust company.
Political munition-making is very active, thou-!
gh the profits will not begin to stack up with !
those of the war munition-makers.
-o
Still, careful housekeepers w r ill not spend the
$2 or $3 a barrel they are officially told they'll
save on flour until it has actually been saved.
o
■o
Bankers are experts on investments, vet they ^
o
never recommend the get-rick-quick brand—think
it over before turning loose.
o
They may flood the country with treaty lit
erature, but the average man, whose mind is made
up, simply won't read it.
o
Bryan seems to think something is coming to
him because the silver dollar is intrinsically worth j
more than the gold dollar.
-O
With 287 war honors to their credit, Princeton
men are feeling pretty chesty, thank you; and
Woody isn't through.
-o
Walesey's
At least you have to hand it to
coachers for knowing the value of bouquets as
popularity-makers.
■o
Speaking of broken pledges, everybody did not
regard it as Solomon-like of Sam Gompers to fea
ture the subject.
-O
Maybe the white collar fellows could not play
even by donning overalls, but they could cut their
laundry bills.
While the cable news keeps tab on Red Bill's
log-swaing, he seems able to keep his log-rolling 1
under cover.
-o
a
o
In prescribing the handling of treaties, mak
ers of our constitution did not include a national
referendum.
o
Good odds-on bet—that Woody will say some
thing about the treaty in his annual message to
Congress.
O
If some scientist would devise a way to use
conference hot air for fuel, the outlook would be
warmer.
o
A country-wide treaty drive may become nec
essary, but it's doubted that it will be enthusing.
•O
John D. isn't worrying over the coal situation,
which is causing many plants to arrange for fuel.
-tv
Considering that there are two cabinet vaca
ncies, the "mentioning" industry is very slack.
o
Smashing Ban Johnson is not pulling the usual
amount of free winter publicity for base ball.
o
These jazz overcoats may be the limit, but » as
long as girls fall for them, boys wear them
-O
Among advertised "bargains" are «neckties for
five plunks, but not all of us are buying 'em.
Hungry for trouble—Baltimoreans who are
seeking enforcement of ancient blue laws.
-o- 2 -
Score one for old H. C. L.—he is knocking Tur
kish harems galleywest by hundreds.
o
Ann Arbor will try to humble its haughty
cooks with a community kitchen.
■U
o
Crapes cannot be legally used for making
1
ÿM
x:
. - •
OUR TWO AUTOCRACIES.
Under present circumstances Senator Freling
huysen's characterization of labor unionism as a
"new autocracy" tending toward Bolshevism can
hardly fail to impress many even of. those who
were entirely in sympathy with organized labor
and its weapon, the strike. Organized labor to
day, with its insatiable demands and its domin
ance of the mdustnal situation, may with quite
„ . , , . ,
sufficient accuracy be termed an autocracy exult
mg and overbearing in its power. It> is too soon
to forget, however, that this new autocracy W r as
called into being by an old autocracy, that of cap-;
ital—an old autocracy now much weakened throu
gh government trust-busting but still
and determined. Paraphrasing the words of Mer
cutio, the suffering public may well cry a plague
on both vour autocracies »
on ootn you aut C acies.
The public has a right to demand concession
and compromise from both these autocracies that
have just faced each other in battle array in the
Industrial Conference, and the President spoke in
. 1L . . ' , ... , ,
I the name of this right of the public when from
his sick bed he earnestly asked that there be no
adjournment until both parties had exhausted
resourcefulness and patience in an effort to come
to some common agreement." In part the Presi
. . _ _
dent wrote further: "Must suspicion and hatred
and force rule us in civil life? Are our industrial
, eaders and Qur industria , workers to live togeth-!
er without faith in each other, constantly strug
gling for advantage over each, doing naught but
what is compelled ?" The President intimated that
both labor and capital are arrogant, which is true,
and that both must yield in some measure ; other
wise it will be necessary to "confess that there
is no method to be found for carrying on indus
try except in the spirit and with the very method;
of war "
What was the answer to this solemn and time-:
ly exhortation from the head of the nation on his
sick bed ? On the night of October 22, in spite
of the President's appeal, labor withdrew from
the National Industrial Conference after failing
to secure agreement to one of its demands, while
capital elected to regain in the conference to-;
^ ether with the assembled representatives of the
general public. Intoxicated by its comparatively!
new power, labor recklessly followed its arro
^ ance and its anger into a bolt - Ca P ital > on the
other hand ' determined but cautious, aware of the
danger of public disapproval as well as chastened
by past experiences including government regula
fion, wisely remained in its seats. To the reflec
ting and unprejudiced observer it is quite clear
that labor is also in need of government regula
tion. The new autocracy would receive much ben
efit from a similar chastening to that which was
visited upon the old.
visited upon the old.
<y
NOW FOR SOBRIETY.
We have reached the beginning of the end of
j the joy-riding period, and a return to the ways of
sober sense is before us.
When the time comes for inflation to subside,
the first break comes in the speculative market in
Wall Street.
The easy mpney period having come
to an end, interest rates increase, and gamblers in
stocks find it hard almost to the point of impossi
ble to borrow cash to protect their margins and
extend their operations. When they cannot get
money, the market becomes uncertain, and then
prices begin to fall. The gamblers' margins are
wiped out, and their brokers sell their stocks im
mediately. Then follows a panicky rush to un
load, and prices of even the best securities go
down.
During the past few days, Wall Street has been
experiencing just such shocks, due to the unmis
takable signs that the period of inflation is about
over, and that from now on we must deal in real
ities and not in golden dreams. Fictitious values
1 must go.
The rest of the country need not be seriously
concerned over the shaking out of the specula
tors. Honest business will not be injured. The!
manufacturing and producing agencies of thej
country are so far behind with orders, and necsi-'
ties are still so scarce, that we are bound to have
a considerable period of sound prosperity, always
barring the possibility that someone may rock the
boat. Banks that will no longer lend for specula
tion will still take care of the needs of legitimate
business.
Though there is no occasion for alarm, we may
still read in the signs of the times a warning to all
to^ proceed with commonsense and bid farewell to
financial joy-riding. Hard work and political con
servatism are very much in order.—Hattiesburg
American. n
■o
Fifty deaths in a Louisiana dance hall fire was
paying the fiddler a high price.
■o
If Vic Berger had brains to equal his impud
ence he would be higher priced.
A
o
Another thing American soldiers did to Eu
rope-taught it to shoot craps.
o
Maybe the movies will eventually bid high
enough to get Sergeant York.
o
Hard to find universal brotherhood in grim
world-trade competition.
o
Money'is safer almost anywhere than in a 4
per cent a month stock
■o
The chutes are ready, but somehow prices
aren't shooting 'em.
o
Cheer up, ye thirsty, it's only the first 100 dry
years that are hard.
■O
No Lodge boom In sight yet.
ADVS.
■By experienced young
_ . local
Keason
_—, _!_
WAN TLD —Two rooms for ligh
Ihop"*"™
__ b
WANTED—To rent or lease be
tween"300 and 400 acres of cultivât
able iand Wlth £ ood cottage on same.
Box^^^Green
j woodj Miss ' '
powerful!
NOTICE—The Greenwood Sanitary
i »"J * th "
pubhc W h / PURE MILK and
CREAM. Satisfaction guaranteed.
Two deliveries daily. Phone 700-4
O. H. Bussey, Mgr.
~ _ A XT
t money to loan—* 1 , 000 , 000.0
to loan at 6 per cent on improve
f armSj ten years time, privilege o
paying after three years.' Inspectioi
free. Small commission. C. L. Lomax
F t 1 2 ~ by * veT
age depth of 242 feet, on River front
Morgan Kimbrough.
"I
o » t tt. cm. • i «
SALE Cypress Shingles, all
Delta & Pine Land Co. of
FOR SALE—Practically new Roy
al Typewriter; in first-class condition.
j g,^h 'ILukvXi* "s! Rogers'! 10 ° 9
;
j grades,
j Mlss -> S cot t, Miss.
i%miles from Greenwood; 300
i " cultivation, 155 in deadening, bal
; ance well timbered; good improve
FOR
FOR SALE—658 acres of good land
acres
j
I
ments and artesian well Price righ
J £qj. quick sale. January 1st delivery
Apply to or address J. F. Bobbitt
j Greenwood, Miss,
I Foster, Express, Trice, Polk and Wan
amaker - These seed are of first pick
| ^"^uaranteed sound. S ONER
se y cows with y° un e calves *
3400, R. B. O'Reilly, Cruger, Miss, j
FOR SALE—Planting Cotton Seed.
FOR SALE—Two extra fine Jer
Phone
THE LAST COTTAGE on Henry
street has been finished. Nice hom
for some lucky man. On liberal terms,
too. Better see about it. ROWA>
THAYER.
WANTED—Janitor. Apply at once
King's Daughters Hospital.
FOR RENT
room, 110 College Street. Phone 690
One unfurnished
c
Cuts, Burns, Bruises,
Stings, Bitès; Eczema
;
r
%
Healing Oil
Soothes, Disinfects, Heals. ^ .
Ask your dealer it
Moatgoacr?
AUbkma.
"XeYO Vixve Co.,
j
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Scene Act 2nd "UP IN MABEL'S ROOM"
Greenwood Theatre, One Night, Wed. Dec. 3.
r was there _o make a sketch cf dron's Hour like a feast,
her. Luncheon was just over, and tiny toddlers there is
she was talking to a little knot of
women. 4 I he first words I heard, qs
[ slid quietly into a nearby seat, were
"National Discuit," recalling plea»
antly my own tasty Uneeda Lunch!
eon. I liked her, and
fortably as she spoke agpSMMP^Hw
and ears busy. fi
"Between the dark and daylight, 1 !
She was qucdingXhhere|^alway^J
of pauspMBMHfllBBBBH
Seems waiting and listening—for thj
children.
things, I've given that ho ur to
babies. First I hadt^^^^0
{Then, when
fo toddle, I
me in m\^
bo on&fdP
For the
a varied
menu, sometimes Uneeda 4 * Biscuit
ifnd milk, sometimes Graham Crack
ers. Oatmeal Crackers or Lunch Bis
cuit. This is changed on special
[occasions to Old Time Sugar Cook
New tons and, rarest of
days when we had
ace créera and Nabisco, and those
kvere our party days.
! "Don't thinT
ir is just a
US happily,
that is all, and made us sure they
ivould keep coming every day—for
jjoi^and I both know we must feed
^l^^|taH^^hildren, as we must
if we would
id after their
Since they were tin
r ays like
ready to
^kup in
^«tenl.
Lldj
o
ani
ten
IS
pi
0jgC'
At the
top of today's A
market list by
unanimous
vote of the family. «4
. NATIONAL BISCUIT COMPANY
tefr
too-i
, the
ten ;
Je hour
t seem
enough
W, but always
ys dainty, al
as only National
Products can be. During the
bra my babies were growing
pad of
Boor.
"lam «
•rent on, "are mu
ana
've h*
S22
clop we never
* -
WOMEN WHO
SUFFER AT HOME
%
Jackson, Miss.:—"M
feminine weakness. I
times and was weak most all of the tune'
was reading in a
STSSSei Favoîî
V ite Prescription and
x \ 5?"®? 8 Do °^ 3 » t" 0
Common Sense
Medical Adviser,
j|3Eii|§E* >> F
complaint was wo
started on the 'Favorite 8 Prescription*
and am glad to say it did me all the good
SÏÏd'thatïwocSd
upon, but after using the 'Prescription'
ÄÄ Â'Æ
recommend Dr. Pierce's medieme^'—
Mrs. Peakly Holt, 934 Deer Park St.
Baton Rouge, La.:—"Going thru I
flSÄaSddL^^e^S^ieTrien^f 1
mine advised me to try Dr. Pierce's
Favorite Prescription and I was mighty
glad I took their advice for it gave me
"ore comfort and relief than any medi- !
I n^ e *l hrU i, th ! 1
" •
trouble was
uasura ouu uizzy speus left me at once, i
I cannot praise 'Favorite Prescription' i
too highly for the gt>od it did me at that !
critical time and I will always recommend !
this-medicine with the utmost pleasure." j
—Mrs. N. B. Richardson, 155 St. Na
poleon.
New Orleans, La.:—"I can highly j
recommend Dr. Pierce's Pleasant Pellets ;
as a safe and reliable home treatment for-,
sluggish liver, constipation and sick
headaches. I have used these 'Pellets'
in my home for a great many years—
have given them to my young children
with most satisfactory results."—M rs.
B. Leimkuhleb, 707 Independence St
MICKIE SAYS
/C£0»TOOS IS SOWS FOfcGrWm'^"^
icosses» * <JVJV KIN DIE AtV
(BEAT 'tW OVJTEN ELEVEN
. NEARS' SUBSCRIPTION AN'
IThen The eorroc'LL set <
( DOWN AN' VS/RVTE HAUT A
/COLUNNN ABOUT WHAT A PIN* /
I PELLER THE DECEASEO *
\ AN' HOVN EVEBNBOON VNU.V, t
[ NUSS HIN\\ I
\
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«14
FOR RENT—Furnished
607 Dewey street, phone 786.
room at
The Ford family own the Fordson
factory and the Ford Motor Co. They
propose to combine the SERVICE for
the benefit of the FORDSON.
-0
Have you seen The New Special Six
Studebaker? Schilling Auto Co.
W,
1
A.
v *
a package
before
5 C
the war
c a package
5
during the war
c a package
5
v
NOW
THE FLAVOR LASTS
SO DOES THE PRICE!
n
à
&
M
&
J,
O/A
A*
ffgiSfif/
P I
Wa
fti
«
157
it
OLIVER STEEL PLOWS
>>
$
sSi
^OUVBH
A.
OLIVER CRESCENT STEEL PLOW FOR
BLACKLAND
These famous plows are designed especially for the ■
delta black waxy and buckshot soil, where shedding is very
difficult... The dirt has an even pressure on the entire sur- I
face of the long mouldboard, which, with the point is soft I
center steel... The beam has a high clearance and is fitted I
with an adjustable clevis for varying conditions. Extra well |
braced for hard usage. Made in 6 inch to 12 inch cut. _
Oliver Blackland Steel Plows are very popular in the I
delta territory because they give perfect satisfaction and ■
always repeat. Thousands of planters in the South are .
using ten to fifty of these plows, which is proof they are I
made right. I
NEW GROUND PLOW
Oliver No. 112 New Ground Plows with wheel land
side are made very strong—runs steady, and can be used as
a general purpose plow after the stumps are gone. 7 inch,
10 inch and 12 inch cut. They make good every time.
OLIVER STEEL BLACKLAND MIDDLE
BREAKERS
They have made a friend of every farmer who uses
them. The perfect shape of the plow makes them favorites
with delta farmers. For sixty-five years the Oliver Chilled
Plow Works have made plows for all sections, and their
knowledge of plow building enables them to construct plows
to fill the requirements of each territory.
If you are interested in something good you can get a
quick reply by writing to—
DEPARTMENT "B
OLIVER CHILLED PLOW WORKS
»*
PLOW MAKERS FOR THE WORLD.
29 TO 35 HOTEL ST.
MEMPHIS., TENN.
«♦«♦* + * + * + *4>*** + * + *4>*<t>**« + #
*
*
GREENWOOD GROCERY CO.
WHOLESALE GROCERS
GREENWOOD, MSS.
*
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* * * + * + *+* + *♦*♦;:-* « r *♦*♦* + * + *
The country at large will overlook
the incident, but Senator Gore will
take note with rather keen interest
that an Oklahoma Congressional dis
trict has nominated by an overwhelm
ing Vote a candidate who baaed his
canvass on support of the League of
IKS
Heals at all Honrs.
Merchants Lunch 65
Kandy Kitchen.
cts.
Dont fail to see the famous female
minstrel, next Friday Sight,
bar 6th.

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