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Greenwood daily commonwealth. (Greenwood, Miss.) 1919-1926, December 06, 1919, Image 2

Image and text provided by Mississippi Department of Archives and History

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87065131/1919-12-06/ed-1/seq-2/

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The Greenwood Daily Commonwealth
J. L. & S. GILLESPIE, Editors and Publishers.
7
South
Entered at Greenwood postoffice as second-class matte». j^s
with
sold
ually
$6.œ a Year, crops
the
and
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to tne as
for republication of all news dispatches credited to it j
not otherwise credited in this paper and also the local
news publications herein. j £ or
Ail, rights of republication of special dispatches j
_ ., , ,. A _ . . , , , .
Prof- Xenides denies that Turkish harems are,
beinv curtailed — says girls are so cheap they are :
Kointr onlaro-Pfl and that when thev are not prettyl on
being enlarged, and that «hen they are not pretty!
enough they are made to draw plows, hitched in
pairs. '
. :
Until press hour Secretary Baker had not chal
lenged Secretary Daniels to a bout with six ounce;
,, t . v s, riw.-.ViKirifr
gloves to try to avenge the toot ball diubbing
Annapolis gave West Point.
I
Boston is more highbrowed than ever since one,
of its scientists announced that the world weighs;
» six sextillion tons, even if it can t buy a on of
ers
AFTERNOON ASSOCIATED PRESS SERVICE.
TELEPHONE NO. 33.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES (By Mail or Carrier)
15 Cents a Week. 50 Cents a Month.
Single Copy é Cents.
MEMBER OF THE ASSOCIATED PRESS. .
ase
or
herein are also reserved.
■o
-o
coal a cent cheaper.
o
Another Carranza joke—orders have been is
sued to Mexican troops near the U- S. border to
be specially watchful in keeping bolshevists out|
of Mexico.
' What women were doing 50 years ago," is the !
!
o
title of a current article, but what we'd much
rather know is what they will be doing 50 years
hence.
■O'
Al. Burleson reports that the P. O. D. clean -1
ed up $44,838,790 during the last fiscal year, but!
1
!
says nothing of the "cussing" it got for poor ser- j
vice.
■O
Maryland need not be so chesty over a chicken
that cost $75—most of us know of instances in
which a chicken has cost many times that amount.
o
They come high, but Washington must have
conferences—that of international labor has been
succeeded by Woody's new industrial powwow.
j
;
j
-o
In appealing to people for support, Attorney
General Palmer merely showed his familiarity
wdth the location of the supreme power.
o
John Bull still has his common sense on strai-j
ght—the house of commons defeated the lottery)
bonds bill by a vote of 276 to 84.
o
Now that Lady Astor has started a craze i
among titled Englishwomen to enter parliament
possibly she'll tell 'em how
j
j
:
-o
Cities that don't want to hear Bill Hayward
speak continue to increase, which'keeps his ad
vance agent on the jump.
-O
Creditable, perhaps, but why use time trying |
to get men interested in schemes that could only
be worked among angels.
O
Golden words in the President's message—
No sort of privilege will ever be permitted to
dominate this country.
<<
• >
o
Taft hasn't been elected adviser of the Ameri
can Legion, but he has given the boys some
mighty good advice
!
Hope red hunger strikers in various jails will!
o
keep it up long enough to save the expense of le
gal executions.
-o
Bermuda will continue for at least another
year to be the only automobileless place in the
civilized world.
-o
South Dakota is getting more political adver
tising than is justified by the number of its elec
toral votes.
o
No map can simultaneously be for and against
the government, though some politicians are try
ing to.
Or
A desirable citizen—he that maketh one ton
of coal do what two "have usually been required
to do.
o
Little Holland also'steps under the spotlight
to announce that she has a woman in her parlia
ment.
o
Entirely too much unaccounted for money is
in circulation in coal mining districts right now.
•o—s
Maybe idle miners are having a lot of fun,
but thousands losing time for lack of fuel are not.
■o
' To read only the optimistic^ predictions, this
might be supposed, to be a brand new Congress.
o
Though the country's dry, barring New Od
leans, men are still being killed by hiccoughs.
;
-o—
ay talk in Congress means n
. . o

it
THE RECOVERY OF THE SOUTH.
7 For the first time since the Civil War the
South is facing an opportunity to get squarely on
j^s f ee t. The shortage of the cotton crop, coupled
with the world-wide demand for it, assures high
prices for that portion of the crop remaining un
sold and which for this time of the year is unus
ually large. The farmers have been holding the
crops themselves, being determined that if high
prices are to prevail they themselves shall reap
the benefit. Hitherto absence of storage facilities
and financing conditions has forced them to sell
as soon as t he crop was made, accepting whatevei
offered ^ them, which usually left
j.^ Q f nQ surplus after settling accounts
£ or th e at j va ndes made to them during the year.
hag been dea , of money made in
cotton, but not by the farmers.
. Any one who travels through the cotton states
struck bv the evidences of poverty
, . , ,
on every which are emphasized when com- m i
with th smart looking towns and weU kept ber
feu g the northerly states . The most
«trikin tr difference is'the laree percentage of illi
striking diiierence is tne large percentage oi mi
teracy found in the South, as compared with the ..
illiteracy that is prevalent among the l,ver
' , .. . fil) Northerner with 1
whites to a degree tnat mis a isorinerner wren
amazement . The writer has met among the mill
workers in the South young men and women twen- j
I ty-one years of age or more who could scarcely
rea( j or wr jt e , but who were the grandchildren of
fam5lies that held high estate lief ore the war, and
though unlettered, were not lacking in the
breeding which their ancestry foreshadowed. In
stances are cited of refined women who are work
ers in the fields or renters of an acre or two that
once formed part of their family estates.
The United States Commissioner of Education
in
beating
are
place
We
system
cient
store
to
aking
Rates.
the
and
your
I
stated that it was useless for the Department of j su
! Agriculture to send literature to many of these
farmers telling them how to improve farm condi
tions, when they could neither read nor write. The
! North is not to blame for this condition, in the
sense that it is deliberately withholding from the
South that which rightfully belongs to it. It is I
-1 . . inu
outgrowth of the conditions following the Civil
1 War and an attempt to continue to sell cotton with j
paid läbor on as cheap a basis as that produced by j
! slave labor. The world has become accustomed to
j
In the North we j
j
cotton selling at a low price,
considered eleven cents a high price in former
times, but we have never stopped to consider the
elements that went into making black or white
much consideration, and, as a matter of fact, we j
not only do not understand the problem of the
South, but we have not even known that the South
'I
had a problem.
In making comparisons between present prices
and pre-war prices we must bear continually, in
mind that the dollar today is worth 47 cents of its
pre-war value, so that spot cotton close to 40 cents
j today should be compared with the price of about
18 1-2 cents before the war. We are therefore
called upon to consider whether cotton at 18 1-2
; cents against 11 cents is a fair basis, for the 40
j cents which the farmer now receives will buy on
ly as much as 18 1-2 cents would have done in
1914.
i
In the North, here, we have driven out sweat
shops in the clothing trade, where conditions of
practical slavery fexisted, and* the people have .been
content to pay something more for the clothing in
the knowledge that the higher price would provide
j a. living wage for the workers, making it possible
j to eliminate illiteracy, to provide better sanitation
: and a generally higher standard of living. Yet
these clothing workers were mostly foreigners or
of foreign extraction. It is quite within reason
to expect that wearers of cotton goods would be
willing to stand some increase in cost if it would
bring to a large number of Americans who happen
to live in the Southern States opportunities for
|
to
schooling, for sanitation^ ahd for better living con
! ditions generally, including that which so very
many of these poor Southern white women know
nothing about an opportunity for recieation.
The prosperity which has come to the rest of
the country means a higher standard of living for j
the people generally, which is a good thing for the j
community. The South is entitled to its own share j
of that prosperity, which will insure a higher
standard of living to its people- It may mean an
increase in the selling price of cotton goods to the
consumer, but if t]ie entire country is prosperous,
including the South, the consumer is bound to feel
that benefit and to find the additional money in
;
le
-j
his pocket with which to pay that increased cost.
If supply and demand conditions have forced cot
ton to a high price, it will be of decided economic
benefit to the whole country that the additional
money is distributed among the producers of the
South where it can be expended for substantial
benefits to thousands of individuals, rather than
to find its way into the hands of a few who have
been fortunate enough to take speculative chan
ton
ces.
If the farmers of the South are able this year
to cash in their success, it will undoubtedly mean
the turning point for the South from comparative
poverty to prosperity.—New York Commercial.
is
—o
New Orleans is more partial to the jag than
to jaz.
o
Comparatively speaking, twas a dry Thanks
giving. * *
o
Uh-huh, the bone dry army is attacking Ger
many.
/
*
To be well-fed it is neeessary to be well-heel
cd.
f
-Or
Jiners" are having the time of their fives,
--
M
it
ti:
jjg

tjm
NOTICE
^ ^
Merchants Lundi 65 cts.
Kandy Kitcnen. been

Don't fail to see the famous female tent
m i ns trel, next Friday night, Decern
ber 5th. river,
' -r—o- '
Phone 1035 or 462 W for your
monev We de- the
.. -
l,ver to PeH^Mai-kebT' The
1 Wa ln
o 0 f
Help Mississippi stamp out tuber
j cul6sis b y bu y in * Christmas seals.
in accordance with
beating and light«
are prepared to e)
place of business at the usual hours.
We will use mir
system which
cient heat to A
the government
* regulations, we
m and dose our
gasoline lighting
furnish suffi
le building com
fortable. During ^this month our
store will remain open from 8 a. m.
to 9:30 p. m.
A. WEILER A CO.
Se were engaged in
aking the first census of the United
Rates. The 1920 census will require
the services of 90,000.
About 650
yers,
-o
terms
by
nated
-o
Have you seen The New Special Six
Studebaker? Schilling Auto Co.
o
river.
the
for
still
the
apy
or
is
of
ita
on
——
8. Greenwood Drug
__ I
of
to
nf
The Daily Commonwealth's Job
Printing Department gives prompt
and satisfactory service. Send us
your orders.
■o
PARKER OR WATERMAN.
Fountain Pens, Military Brush, sets,
I Traveling Cases and numerous other
j su it a ble Christmas Gifts at
MeINTYRE'S.
-o
Drink Pure Coca Cola at our Foun
tain, Greenwood Drug Company, Tel
ephone 318.
I Phone 1035 or 462 W for your
We de
-o
inu . „ .
Meats and sav^money^
j llver lo p e i tz M ark e ts .
j
o
It's an indifferent politician wh
j cannot figure benefit or his part.
j from the returns of the off-year stat
j daily,
elections.
-O
New goods arriving by exprès
Visit our store. Greenwoo.
'I
Drug Company.
-o
Power farming has come. A FORD
SON can do your" work.
in
40
in
■o
The Daily Commonwealth's Job
Printing Department gives prompt
and satisfactory service. Send us
*your orders.
Telephone 3i
Company.
-o
Just Think
Nice Pork 30c per lb.
Peltz Markets.
-o
Christmas seals, sold here and ev
erywhere in Mississippi, cost one cent.
Buy them!
of
in
or
be
for
-o
Have Your Doctor Telephone your
prescriptions. The price will be right.
Greenwood Drug Company.
o
Health bonds" help bring down the
oss of lives in Mississippi. Buy one
.nd be a shareholder in the health of
Mississippi.
it
o
Let your next car be a Stud^
baker. Schilling Auto Co.
-o
- Obey that impulse and buy Red
Cross Christmas seals.
of mas seals, sold at one cent each,
for j
the j
j
Auto Co.
an
the
feel
in
o
Help this county get a permanent
; dintention camp for tuberculosis suf
ferers by buying Red Cross Christ
o
Can you imagine a more beau
-j tiful Christmas gift than a Stu
debaker Automobile? Schilling
o
Our Telephone number is 318. Call
us for quick service. Greenwood Drug
Company.
-o
Over 50 per cent of tractors sold
are FORDSONS. Think it over.
cot
the
-*—o
Have a heart and buy a seal in the
Christmas sdle.
o
Elmers Candy. A shipment to ar
rive Monday. Always Fresh. Green
wood Drug Company.
-o
Just Think
Nice Pork 30c per lb.
Peltz Markets.
-o
United States marshals acted as en
tmerators at the first nine decennial
Each marshal had as many
censuses.
assistants as were necessary tç prop
erly cover his allotted territory.
-o
We have two of th* best
n Greenwood.
Kandy Kitchen.
o
If a Hohenzollern come-back la not
confidently expected, why does the
German republic Insist on remaining
"imperial"? 4
f
o
second-hand Dodge
s m first class con
tar quick sale. Kim
We have a f
Bros, Touring
anion, istrgsi
brough Auto G 0.
MkBj
*rr
8® «
a hunch that the theft <r
We
' - V
KS
>■
::
Austln has a case
been filed in American courts in which
history has been involved to the ex
tent that it is in the question of the
ownership of the channel of the Red
river, beneath the bed of which are
-»""»le oil deposits.
This question has been engrossing
the attention of lawyers, oil men, land
owners and federal and state officials.
The S,ate ° f Te " S C "* ima 'T mers " p
ln the bed of the river to tte center
0 f the channel, while the federal gov
ernment and the state of Oklahoma
H ►
k fc-
Wichita Indians Now Set Up An
cient Title to River
Channel.
« >
HISTORY INVOLVED M SUIT

i
X
*
Question Engrosses Attention of Law
yers, Oil Men, Land Owners and
Federal and State Officials—Gives
History of Wichita Claim.

%
*
*
oppose the claim of Texas under the
terms of the treaty of Spain in 1819,
by which the northern boundary of the
Spanish dominions in Texas was desig
nated as the south bank of tffe Red
river.
The - federal authorities hold that !
the ownership of the Red river bed
areas in dispute belong to the Indian
tribes which owned the adjacent res
ervations, and the state of Oklahoma
tnaintaine that, as a meandering
stream, the bed of the Red river is
state property and should be leased
for the benefit of the state school fund.
Another Claimant.
Joseph B. Thoburn, secretary of the
Oklahoma Historical society, has ad
vanced the suggestion that there is
still another claimant to the owner
ship of the oil bearing area oi llie
channel of the Red river, namely, the
Wichita Indians. Mr. Thoburn in the
course of an extended statement says :
Older than any of the claims of j
ownership which are now being
pressed for the possession of the oil
bearing areas of the channel of the
Red river—older than any claim of
the State of Texas by rights derived
from Mexico or Spain, and older than
apy claim of the State of Oklahoma
or of the United States which may
have been derived from France
through the purchase of Louisiana—
is the right of the aboriginal owners
of the land on both sides of the river,
and these are the people of the Wich
ita tribe of Indians.
"The ancestors of the Wichita Id
dlans have lived in Oklahoma and ad
jacent states for a thousand years, and
for' approximately five (hundred years
past they have occupied the country
on both sides of the Red river in that j
part of Its course where it traverses j
the Burkburnett oil fields. In using
the word 'occupied' in this connection,
I do so advisedly, for these people
have always been sedentary in their
habits, living in fixed tillages and de
pending largely upon the cultivation
of the soil for their subsistence.
"The rights of the Wichita Indians
to the ownership of these lands has
never been extinguished by purchase,
exchange or otherwise, though state
and federal governments have seem
Ingly proceeded on the theory that no
such right ever existed. From the time
nf its foundation the federal govern
ment has always paid due regard, at
least In form, to the extinguishment
of title to lands which were claimed
by the several Indian tribes under ab
original occupancy. The one exception
to this has been that of the Wichita
Indians, who lived in the upper Red
river country, between the Canadian
and Brazos rivers.
<>
us
ev
the
one
of
Indians Cede Land.
"In 1818 certain chiefs and warriors
of the Quapaw tribe of Indians, in
council at St. Louis with William
Clark and Auguste Chouteau, as com
missioners representing the govern
ment of the United States, entered in
to a treaty by the tofin«? of which they
ceded all of the lands in Oklahoma and
Texas between the Arkansas and Can
adian rivers on the north and the Red
Red
suf
river on the south to the government.
The fact that the Quapaw Indians
lived in eastern Arkansas, that they
seldom went as far west as the eastern
boundary of Oklahoma and that they
never by occupancy or otherwise exer
cised any form of ownership or juris
diction over any of the lands within
200 miles of the region where the
Wichitas were living, do not seem "to
have entered into the consideration
Call
sold
at all, if, indeed, the government com
missioner had any knowledge of the
existence of the Wichitas at that time.
Yet, with this Quapaw transaction as
a basis, the government of the United
States executed a giant of these land?
to the people later. More than thirty
years later the Wichita people first
learned that their country had been
sold by the Quapaw and then granted
to the Choctaws.
"If the government of the United
States ever means to do the square
and honorable thing by the Wichita
Indians it will never have a better
chance than it has at the present time.
Their lands are gone—sold to strang
ers without recompense to them and
without their consent—but they still
have» an equitable claim to the owner
ship of the Red River channel oil prop
erties, and simple justice demands
that they be given a chance to eelab
itsh it"
the
ar
en
■o
not
the
con
Shall the Government still live r o
shall Bolshevist-poisoned labor union
ism succeed to command in this coon
try's affairs?
<r
' - V
KS
PUS
r0
»♦♦♦♦** »»♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦ » ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦• • ++♦♦♦♦»♦♦ ♦
iaai^^ . >uw5m

1

>
__ IrfömiwA
How to Keep Out of the Coal Line
11
fy
the
Make the coal you have last longer and give^more heat by using t
world-renowned Dunham Radiator Traps on your heating system. Th
ittcaily remove the air and water that clog up the radiators and keep
un from doing its work. Cost of change-over is low.
We recommend the coal-saving Dunham Heating Service, and will
make estimates for homes, apartments, factories and office buildings with
out obligation. To save coal, see us now.

i
ey
X
*
au<
the

%
*
*
I HAVE FULL CREW OF FIRST CL Vs
MECHANICS AND GUARANTEE AI L MY
WORK. 22 YEARS EXPERIENCE.
JOHN A. MACK
PHONE 300
!
H ■:-4"M > ++*++++++++**+++'!- •>
ANNOUNCEMENT
Complete Line Of The Celebrated
LYON AND HEALY
AND WASHBURN
!
j
*-****4>*******4 > * + * + * + * , l , * + * + *
*
^
*
*
*
^
*
*
^
j *
j «
_
* 4 -* + *4»*4 , *e , *< , *^ , ***'*'*'*'*'*'***'*'*'*
|c
*
^
*
*
*
PIANOS
NOW ON DISPLAY AT J. D. LANHAM'S
HOWARD STREET STORE
PHONE 2.
Plain And Player Styles On Display. Music Rolls.
Inspection Invited.
C. L. DAVIS
The music man of Mississippi
*
PLANTERS OIL MILL & MFC.
CO.
*
*

GREENWOOD, MISSISSIPPI.
«
*
MEAL AND HULLS
*
*
*
WE HAVE ON HAND AT ALL TIMES OLD
STYLE HULLS AND BRIGHT MEAL.
PRICES TELEPHONE 109 OR 231. :
*
FOR
*
*
*
HAVE YOUR COTTON GINNED WITH US.
*
*
************
**************^
*
*
GREENWOOD GROCERY CO.
WHOLESALE GROCERS
GREENWOOD, MISS.
*
*
*

*
*
*
************* + *♦***♦*♦*♦*♦*
**********************************
' DELTA MACHINE WORK« '
*
m
•w
—ALL KINDS OF—
Engine, Boiler and Gin Repairing Promptly Executed
New and Second Hand Machinerv and Sunnlie*
Agents for Reliable Oil Ensinea
GREENWOOD. MISS.
*
*
4
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in *
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j
|
! *
i
J ^
«
4
<
Tel. 34
* • •
* *
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******************'* * *<r***********4
*
i d I m-KENNEY DRY GOODS ™
•6
m
41
INCORPORATED
; *
4 c
!
j
*
j
*
WHOLESALE ONLY
GREENWOOD, MISS.
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4
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<-*«'»**.»****♦**>******* ************ ^
All of Mississippi stood up and took i
notice of the influenza epidemic last
year because it claimed something
like 2,400 victims. Tuberculosis kill
ed upward of 3,000 and will continue
to take greater tolls each year unless
1
enough money is raised by the State
Association to carry on the fight. Buy
Red Cross Christmas Seals, and share!
the privilege of saving lives.
40 Years On The Job j
o
I put in 40 years as a practical
druggist (now in my 47th year) and
compounder of prescribtions before I
put Number 40 For The Blood on
the market and/at this late date in
life I would not recommend a medi
cine that I did not believe was equal
or superior to any other. I have ob
served the effect of Number 40 in
thousands of cases and use it uni
versally in my own family for blood
poisoning in any form. For constipa
tion, biliousness, stomach and liver
troubles. For chronic rheumatism, I
catarrh, eczema and all skin troubles . 1
There is more Number 40 sold and
used in this vicinity than all other
blood medicines combined. J. C. Men
denhall, Evansville, Ind.
Sold and recommended by McIntyre
(Adv.)
Drug Company.
o
Buy a Christmas seal mid help save
a life.
- -
You are commanded to appear be
fore the Clerk of the Chancery Court
CHANCERY SUMMONS.
The State of Mississippi.
To Louise B. Aston, Box, 1, Lyons,
' Illinois:
of the Count y of Leflore, in said State
on a Rule Da y of said court to ^ heUi
at the office of said Clerk on the 2nd
Monday of December, 1919, to defend
the suit in said court of R. N. Love,
wherein you are defendant.
This 13th day of November, A. D.
1919.
_ ____ _
T0 , L
WORKS ° F ITTA BENA ° IL
WUKKo:
, You are hereb y notlf,ed that tbe
f,rst meeting of subscribers to th
capital stock of the Jtta Bena Oi
Works will be held m the office at the
iaItta Re ? a - Mississippi on
J ft u * sday ' the ?? , day of „ December '
1919 * at ten ° clock A - at wh,cb
tH ^. the / :orp ^f t, ® n "»U be organ.zed.
171,8 the 29th day of November,
1919
A. R. BEW, Clerk.
(Seal)
S. F. JONES, ✓
H. L. WALTON,
M. P. STURDIVANT,
Tuberculosis caused an economic
loss of $1,800,000 In llissusippi last
year. Help reduce that figure by pur
chasing Christmas

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