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Greenwood daily commonwealth. (Greenwood, Miss.) 1919-1926, December 18, 1919, Image 3

Image and text provided by Mississippi Department of Archives and History

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87065131/1919-12-18/ed-1/seq-3/

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BIG BUSY
STORE
*
I
9
On the Busy Corner
On
the Busy Corner
T
SHOP
EARLY
FOUNTAIN'S BIG BUSY STORE OPEN EVENINGS UNTIL 9 O'CLOCK
All Your
Shopping Under One Roof
a
(T
D
fl
/
»
EXCEPTIONAL VALUES
S-U-I-T-S
Women's and
Misses.
\
\
Just Received
By New York
Express, 50
Evening Dresses
Beautifully
Trimmed in dashing
colors
LADIES
REST
ROOM
2ND FLOOR
\
In a wide range of wanted styles and at very moderate
prices. We feel sure that they will meet with your appro
val. The materials are Serge, Tricotine and Silks. All
beautifully silk lined. Quality in every garment sold
here. The policy of this "Big, Busy Store" is to give bet
ter styles, better qualities, better values, better service—
The House of Truth.
$37.75
$69.50 5100 00 v,luM
\
\
Fast Passenger
Elevator
Service
To All Dept's
$47 75 Values
$59.50 590 -°° Value8
$60.00 590 00 v,taM
SEE THEM IN OUR
Big Window
(Women's and Misses)
MAIL
FOUNTAIN'S
2ND
OR
C-O-A-T-S
PHONE
ORDERS
FILLED
THE STORE OF
A THOUSAND
GIFTS
FLOOR
/
Beautifully trimmed, some with fur,
others plain tailored. In every want
ed color and style. Coats and Coatees,
Velour, Plush. See a few of them
showing now in our big window.
$45.00 TO $65.00
THE
GIFT
FOR HER
STORE
FOR MEN
AND BOYS
Furs
Silk Underwear
Sweater Coats
Blouses
Skirts
Petticoats
Dresses
Kimonas
Corsets
Hand Bags
Trunks
Traveling Bags
Suit Cases
Silk Hose
Gloves
Toilet Articles
Linens
Dress Goods
Neckwear
Ribbons
Stationery
Blankets
Comfortables.
MEN'S
A P D ACTICAL GIFT FURS
WEAR
GIFTS FOR HIM
GLADDEN THE LITTLE
ONE'S HEART
Bring Them Up To Toy Land
Pajamas
Men's Silk Shirts
Sox
Neckwear
Muffler Scarfs
Handkerchiefs
Suspenders
Collars
Underwear
Belts
Bath Robes
Men's Sweaters
Gloves
Smoking Jackets
Men's Hats
Men's & Boys Caps
Men's Wool Shirts
•* SATURDAY *
ONLY
*DOLL SPECIAL*
* 1-3 Off Marked *
Prices
* Entire Stock *
A COMPLETE SHOWING
^ >
TOYS—TOYS—TOYS
\
Story Books, All Kinds Reading books of every
kind. Horns, Drams, Dolls, Bicycles, Rocking
Horses, Automobiles, Electrical Goods of every
kind, Thermos Bottles, Baby Doll Buggies, Tea
Sets, Play Suits, Guns, Game Sets, China, Glass
and Crockery. Aluminum Ware—A very beauti
ful stock to select from. Baskets of every kind.
Pictures and Picture Frames, Serving Trays,
Christmas Seals, Papers. Cards, Candle Sticks,
Scrap Books, Flower Vases and Pots* Laundry
Baskets. A complete stock of Christmas Novel
ties. Every department of this Big, Busy Store
ready to serve you. Stocks complete—Clerks po
lite—Prices right—Don't delay—Shop here early.
Other Popular
PRICE COATS
in a wide Range
of Wanted
Styles and Colors
For Choice
.oo
39
*
*
(FOUNTAIN'S THIRD FLOOR)
—STYLE
—QUALITY
—VALUES
—SERVICE
7
*
*
9
ON THE BUSY CORNER
Have A
Sonora
In Your Home
Xmas
Morning
Hear All The
New Records
Talking Machine
Dept.—3rd Floor.
1
t
big- BUSY store
It required 18 months to complete
the enumeration work for the first de- j
In 1920 the \
cennial census in 1790.
Census Bureau plans to coipplete the I
enumeration work for the entire coun_led
try in from two to four weeks and]
the population figures In
less t s an three months from the date
tiie enumeration work is completed.
announce
■o
7
Shall the Government still live, o
shall Bolshevist-poisoned labor union
has disclosed the fact]
more men in the United
n women.
ism succeed to command in this coun
try's affairs?
o
Every <
fegäay
■ * ' "'i
v* . -? 1
, • . • % .
>;
-

jäkr.-;
All of Mississippi stood up and took
notice of the influenza epidemic last
year because it claimed something
Tuberculosis kill
like 2,400 victims,
upward of 8,000 and will continue
to take greater tolls each year unless
enough money is raised by the State
Association to carry on the fight. Buy
Red Cross Christmas Seals, and share
the privilege of saving Uvea.
-o
BLANK FORMS—Rent. Share, an
Lease Contracts; Abstract Blanks
Notice of Protest; Promissory Notes
Collateral Notes; Nurse* Records
Posted Sign Cards, For Sal« «nd Fo
Rent Sign Cards at The Daily Com
monwealth Office.
.-3 .. _ ^ , î
It is doubted that inhumane treat
O——r?
» -
a
i
Jggtfti
Säs!
jig
-. ''
ps

Thé Women Only
Ask A Square Deal
i
Ratify the National Amendment
giving women the ballot:
The amendment reads:
"Section 1. The right of citizens
of the United States to vote shall not
be denied or abridged by the United
States or by any State on account of
sex.
"Section 2. Congress shall have
the power by appropriate legislation
to enforce the provisions of this ar
tide."
Nineteen Stoles have ratified. The
î ___at wà| beeomuvpait of to#
constitution of the United States when
a ox tuny
by toe
m
.
six States. It will come before the
next session of the Mississippi Leg
islature.
foil suffrage to their women. In
twenty-nine States women have pres
dential suffrage.
Mississippi women ask your sap
port.
i * Sfll
Fifteen States have given
Mias. Ratification Com.
-—o
The statistics gathered by the Cen
sus Bureau in regard to farms ar
used quite extensively by the Depart
ment of Agriculanre in its work o
aiding farmers.
-©■
Why don't they take the risks and
lend toe Prince of Wake to Ireland?
il PW
eould ktodly faQ to
ef such a winning way
4 ? r
Important Notice.
If yon want The Daily Com
monwealth, you must pay your
subscription by the 1st of Jan
uary. We are sending out state
ments now and these bills must
be paid or your paper will be
stopped promptly. There will
be no exceptions. News print is
very scarce and all newspapers
will have to save as much paper
as possible. We are going to save
our part by stopping all delin
quents, so if yon want The Daily
Commonwealth you must pay
for it
-o
Obey that impulse and boy Red
Cross Christmas seals.
%
GREENWOOD,
-It
BIG MEN AT POKER TABLE
Correspondent of Saturday Evening
Poet Writes of Games in Which
Statesmen Figured.
Mr. Cleveland was fond—not oven
fond—of cards. He liked to play the
noble game at, say, a dollar limit—*
even once and a while for a little more
—but not much more. And, as Dr.
Norvin Green was wont to observe of
Commodore Vanderbilt. "He held them
exceeding close to his bosom."
Mr. Whitney, secretary of the navy
in bis first administration, equally
rich and hospitable, had often "the
road gang," as a certain group, mainly
senators, was called, to dine, with the
soiree
to
ed
a
to
or
of
of
to
after-dinner
or
inevitable
seance. I was, when in Washington,
invited to these parties. At one of
rhem I chauced to sit between the
president and Senator Don Cameron.
Mr. Carlisle, at the time speaker of
the house—who handled his cards like
a child and, as we all knew, couldn't
play a little—was seated on the oppo
site side of the table.
After a while Mr. Cameron and 1
began bulling the game— I recall that
the limit was $5—that is, raising and
back-raising each other, and whoever
else happened to be in, without much
or any regard to the cards we held.
It chanced on a deal that I picked
op a pat flush ; Mr. Cleveland a pat
full. The Pennsylvania senator and I
.w »nt to the extreme, the president, of
course, willing enough for us to play
his hand for him. But the speaker of
the house persistently stayed with us
and kept on.
We could not drive him out.
When it came to a draw Senator
Mr. Cleve
But Mr. Car
Cameron drew one card,
land and I stood pat.
lisle drew four cards. At length, after
much banter and betting, it reached
a showdown and, mirabile dictu, the
speaker held four kings !
"Take the money, Carlisle ; take the
money," exclaimed the president,
ever I am president again you shall
be secretary of the treasury,
don't you make that four-card draw
lt
But
too often."
He was president again, and Mr.
Carlisle was secretary of the treaa
ury.—Saturday Evening Post.
The Art of Reading.
The printing press has helped liber
alize and free the people from tyr
Books and magazines and
have done much to dis
ly
anny.
newspapers
seminate knowledge and bring infor
mation into the homes of the people.
They have promoted the art of read
ing and stimulated the desire to read
more.
At the same time the very multi
tude of books and periodicals has cul
tivated a desultory method of read
ing, a desire to skim over everything
and digest little or nothing. Classic
writings, the great books of history,
biography and fiction have in a meas
ure gone out of fashion. "Solid read
as it is called, is not often in
ing,
dulged in, and the names of great
writers, whose productions will live | a
always, are unfamiliar to many of the
present generation.
The excuse is that we live in a very
rapid age, and there is no time to
read heavy literature. The reason is
that most persons have lost their
taste for history, for biography, for
good reading. They have partaken of
the froth for so long they have lost
the taste for the substantial.—New
York Herald.
Dundee Honors Beatty.
The Loekit Book of the burgesse«
of the city and royal burgh of Dun
dee, Scotland, was opened the other
day, and to the names of high dis
tinction alreauy Inscribed therein the
was added, "in
name of Earl Jîeatty
recognition of his great services to
the empire and in testimony of the
high esteem entertained by the citi
zens of Dundee for his distinguished
achievements in the service of the
Dundee received the distin
state.'
guished Admiral and Countess Beatty
with all the exuberant enthusiasm of
a city on the borders of the North sea,
which was the theater of operations,
as it was the battle ground of the
grand fleet. Earl Beatty spoke of the
rapidity and efficiency with which the
ship-repairing resources of Scotland
had been converted to the services of
the fleet, and paid a tribute to the
bravery of Scottish fishermen when
acting as minesweepers.
Music to Quell Mobs.
There is an authentic story of a
dangerous sedition in Lacedemonia
having been quelled by music; and
Boetius tells us of bands of rioters
being dispersed on more than one
occasion by the playing of the mu
sician Damon when the troops and
civic authorities had proven power
less.
Imagine today in case of a mob out
break sending for a cellist or jazz
outfit instead of calling out the na
tional guard ; placing a battery of
trombones at strategic points instead
of a battery of machine guns. Yet.
after all, it might not be such a bad
Idea.—Chicago American.
Seems Like Extravagance.
Mrs. Styles—Is that a new silk hat
you've got, Nicholas?
Mr. Styles—Yes, my dear.
"How much did It cost?"
"Why, It was eight dollars, dear."
"What! Eight dollars, and not a
bird or a ribbon or a feather on it?"
The Reason.
"You don't seem inclined to embark
on the sea of life in a matrimonial
craft."
"Not I; it is too much of a revenue
cutter."
-o
In 1914, the year tne last manufac
turers census was taken, there were
275,000 manufacturing establishments
reported. The Census Bureaeu ex
pects about 300,000 establshiments to
be listed in 1920.
-o
Help this county get a permanen
dentention camp for tuberculosis suf
ferers by buying Red Cross Christ
mas seals, sold at one cent each.
Red
-o
Take The Da 11 * Commonwealth.
y
mm
GREENWOOD, MlSä., DEG. Id. 19 Id.
RELIEF IN TEARS
Weeping off Real Value in the
Life off Mankind.
Provision of Nature to Relieve the
G rief -Centers of Thslr Sensibility
and Fit Nervous Organization
to Endure Sorrow.
German statesmen have shed tears
over the hard terms of peace imposed
upon them by the allie«.
It would not be necessary tor one
to be hopelessly cynical to be remind
ed by this incident of the legendary
tears of the crocodile; though indeed
a sympathetic spirit might be inclined
to rejoice In the spectacle of such
weeping, for Germany's own good ; say
ing with the poet: "She must weep,
or she will die."
There are few physical functions
more familiar than the shedding of
tears, and there is probably none more
complex and Inscrutable; none more
strangely mingling spirituality and
science. From the material point of
view tears are nothing but an excre
tion of salt water from glands of the
eyes. They consist normally of the
purest of water with a small admixture
of common salt, or chloride of sodium,
such as exists In the blood. In some
abnormal conditions of the body they
contain other chemicals. „ Thus one
suffering from poisoning with salts
of antimony may shed tears contain
ing that chemical, so that tears them
selves are poisonous; and diabetic pa
tients shed tears containing sngar.
From another point of view tears
are manifestations of emotion and al
ways spring from the heart. That Is
to say one does not weep because of
the mental processes of the brain but
because of the feelings of the heart.
Even if the tears be hypocritical and
summoned up for an Insincere purpose
they are produced by the brain's work
ing back to the heart and making an
appeal to Its emotion. An eminent ac
tor when asked how he was able to
shed real tears at will replied that he
did so by calling to remembrance his
father who was dead and whom he
greatly loved.
It Is to be noticed, too, that the
nervous excitation which results In
tears is caused by grief, but not near
ly so much by actual pain. "In the days
before the use of anesthetics," says a
great surgical authority, "I have had
patients who were undergoing opera
tions faint ; I have heard them cry out
and scream until they made the by
standers sick and pale, but rarely If
ever have they shed tears."
Again, it is observed that tears are
of much value tq the life of mankind.
That value is not merely in the fact
that their flow gives relief, bnt still
more in the indication that the grief
centers are being reprieved of their
sensibility and that the nervous organ
ization is being fitted to endure sor
row with fortitude.
| a great authority, "the escape and free
to
is
of
extreme shock of it through recours«
to tears; for, to quote the poet again,
"She must weep or she will die."— New
fork Herald.
As a rule," says
escape of tears relieves the heart and
aaves the body the shock of grief."
It is obviously well, then, that Ger
many should weep. To say that. Is
not to exult in her suffering, but rath
er to rejoice In her relief from it. The
suffering is Inevitable as fate. It Is
well that she shall be saved from the
Town Made Famous by Oysters.
The oyster season at Colchester,
England, was opened with quaint cere
monies. The mayor and corporation
traversed the fishery grounds in a
dredger and the mayor made the first
haul of oysters. The mayor and cor
poration then consumed gin and gin
ger-bread—a custom which has pre
vailed since the fishery was first
opened under royal charter In the
reign of Richard I. A telegram ex
pressing dutiful devotion was sent to
the king at a luncheon afterwards on
Peewit island. The early Saxons so
appreciated the Colchester fishery that
they took three oyster knives for their
arms, and this device still forms the
arms of the county of Essex.
Colchester fishery lost all their con
tinental customers during the war,
but the British public consumed all
that they could supply,
most successful seasons, and were able
to give 40,000 oysters to military hos
pitals.
to
the
of
the
the
the
of
the
The
They had
a
and
one
mu
and
In the Earth's Interior.
From the evidence available, R. D.
Oldham traces three divisions in the
earth's interior. The solid outer crust,
with a thickness of % to 1 per cent of
the radius (or 20 to 40 miles), has
high permanent rigidity, but from un
known causes has been subject to
deformations, with displacements of
as much as 10 miles vertically and
100 horizontally. The next section,
about half the radius in thickness, has
high rigidity for such stresses as tidal
action with low rigidity for long-con
tinued stress. The central nucleus
has low rigidity. The conclusions re
lating to the two inner divisions are
drawn from records of earthquake
waves.
out
jazz
na
of
Yet.
bad
hat
a
A Green Clerk.
"This lady Is looking for rugs. She
says Axminster."
"Pll ask him if I can find hlm, but
Pm new around here."— Louisville
Courlar- Journal.
Their Kind.
"Pop, what are fabricated vessels' 00
"I think they are the kind your Un
cle Henry took his remarkable voy
ages In. my
■o
were
ex
to
To judge from the utterances am
activities of Dr. Nicholas Murray But
1er, he is of the opinion that another
college president in the White House
w«uld be an excellent thing.
■o
The Daily Common wea 1 th's Jo
Printing Department gives promp
and satisfactory service. Send u
your or ders.
suf
-o
Do something worth-while! Buy
Red Crois Christmas seals.

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