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Greenwood daily commonwealth. (Greenwood, Miss.) 1919-1926, December 19, 1919, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87065131/1919-12-19/ed-1/seq-1/

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ASSOCIATED PRESS NEWS SERVICE
OON EXCEPT SUNDAY
PUBLISHED EVERY i
J. L. & S. GILLESPIE, Editors and Publishers
SUBSCRIPTION : *%8?5c ®*S2?J5;
IÀY AFTERNOON, DECEMBER 19, 1919
GREENWOOD, LEFLORE COUNTY, MISSISSIPPI,
VOLUME 4—NUMBER 95
CAMPAIGN ON FOR
A GREATER I.I.&C.
Some Pertinent Facts Relative To
What This Great Institution Means
To The State Of Mississippi.
The State Legislature which con
venes in Jackson next January will be
asked to make an appropriation suffi- a
cient for the needed enlargement and
general improvement of the Mississ
ippi Industrial Institute and College
at Columbus; and Miss Ruth Dickins, til
in behalf of the Leflore county girls
attending that splendid institution,
writes the editor of The Daily Com- j
monwealth the following pertinent 1 tie.
facts relative to what the I. I. & C. can
means to Mississippi and the neces
sity for the increased appropriation !
which will be asked for:
We, the Leflore county girls, ask
that you place before the readers of
The Daily Commonwealth what the!
L I. & C. means to Mississippi.
(4
Wej
I
We belong to the good old Mag-|uation?
nolia State and are proud of it.
realize that Mississippi has done a
lot for us and has made us what wej
In other words, we !
are in bad need of a new Chapel, a ;
new dormitory, a hospital annex,!
teachers' j
«4
are. But now the time has come for
new clothes.
99
44
greater appropriation for
salaries, a larger endowment, and
last, but not least, a new name. We
have been held back long enough by
Industrial Institute and
College." We are not an industrial i
institute or a reform school, as the;
name indicates. We are tired of ex- i
plaining to people outside the State
that the Mississippi Industrial In-| n
stitute and College is the Woman's
State College, and not a reform
school, OT the I. C. Railroad, as some
think. In the second place our mail a
is confused with that of Mississippi w
at Columbia,
44
the name,
f y
Industrial Institute
Mississippi, a reform school for in
corrigible people.
We feel that when Mississippians
brought face to face with these
«4
are
facts, they will "step in line" with us
in freeing this splendid institution of
this name.
"It is needless for me to say that ;
we need a new dormitory and a new
chapel, for this fact was "brought
home to us when numbers of splendid
girls were turned away due to lack of
The chapel is one of the old
It was
room.
est buildings on our campus,
built when the school had an attend
of three hundred—and now, al
ance
though it tops the thousand mark, the
chapel remains the same! On' nights
of big entertainments, when the Co
lumbus people join us, we are forced
surrender"
seats and retire to the rear (if there
is any.)
This letter has been rather long to
have been written to a business man,
but we forget we are monopolizing
other people's time in our enthusiasm
making our College the best."
The Daily Commonwealth is most
heartily in favor of any proposition.
that has a tendency to supply the j
needs of our superb institution for the.
education of the young women of Mis-,
sissippi, and we sincerely hope that
the Legislature will appropriate am
pie funds to meet all the demands
made by Miss Dickins, in behalf of
the Leflore county girls, as outlined
in her well written letter.
highly-prized
our
to
44
over
_ .
Grets Curious Letter ' the
-o
Chamber of Commerce
As
gine
The following letter has been re
ceived by the Chamber of Commerce.
Anyone in a position to give the de
sired information will please do so:
"Sir Will you kinely informe me
A bout that otomobile Reck there
the itiam paper sed that Docke San
ders was hert there and i Think the
Name is rong it mite Be docke Suth
erlan he had a ford Car an was trav
lin frame Esseks Junkshun to Mis his
Car Was all Yello with indian heds
panted cm the sids of The car he is
advertiaan Happyleen he Has got a
Munkie in a Bocks will you plese fin
Out if it was Him an lett me No
' Quik he baa got a tato on one arm
And gole teeth in frunt sicksty y eras
ole pleae ban this leter to some one
if «this hi him and hav them fin Out
If it was an hav him com here
as Soon as ÿe is aBel i will do all i
If it is him if it is him
i want to No
ter
Can for
hin Nass»« ........ ... . _
for Shut* H H is him plese anAure.
»
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VS
DOASMUCHFOR
MEN AS CATTLE
Clay County Voted For Eradication
Why
Tuberculosis Among Cattli
Not Extend Remedy To Men?
The United States Department of
Agriculture notes that it has received;
a telegram from Clay county, Miss
issippi, which reads: "Election Clay
county favors tuberculosis eradica
tion." That looked rather unique un
til reading further down was the ex
planation that it was cattle instead of
men that the eradiction applies to.
Clay county is going to save the cat
tie. The human victim of tuberculosis
can fight it out for himself.
North Carolina is working on both
In a way the control of i
human tuberculosis is receiving ad-j
problems.
vaneed attention. Yet we are not do- 1
ing as much for our people as the ;
Mississippi county is doing for its,
Is not that a remarkable sit- ;
A whole county will unite
under the authority of the law to sup
cattle.
cattle.
Mag-|uation?
press tuberculosis in
when it comes to men we lose inter
a good cow is worth
! more than a hundred dollars. A good
; man has no cash value,
No, that is not the situation at all.
j Our whole trouble *is that we follow
But
est. You see
the bell wether, like a flock of sheep,
We established a Department of Ag
«culture in the State and in the Na- ;
tion, and we tell the departments to
i get results. They see the folly of al
lowing disease among the livestock,
i and they enlist the people in the
movement to stop it.
n ot been bold enough yet to have a
secretary of health in the President's
cabinet, so health jogs along as a few
enthusiastic individuals can drive it,
a nd we pay no attention to the man
w ho gets tuberculosis and dies.
Some day a man will be rated as
high as a cow. Then we will vote on
whether to have tuberculosis among
the people of the county as well as
vote for the cattle, and when we get
one county started we will have the
whole job on the way to salvation.
If we would turn Dr. McBrayer loose
But we have
his hands are tied.—Raleigh, N. C.,
News and Obesrve, Oct. S. 1.1».
tuberculosis and give '
and authority hej
; tomorrow on
him the money
would wipe the thing out in a county
or in the State. Unfortunately he is j
working for people, not cattle, and;
-o
, j
r 3X3.1 Accident IS ' 19T7.
arrowly Averted of
__
A fatal Accident was narrowly av
erted yesterday morning at the Sou
them Railway crossing at the inter
section of Carrollton Ave. and Lamar
street> when the automobile driven by and
j k j ra< j ac k Majet was struck by a Sou- have
tbern eastbound train. The occupants
^he car were Mrs. Majet and two get
children, her niece and nurse. None is
Q £ t bem were injured, with the excep
^ on ^[ rs Majet, who received a
j s ]j gbt wo und on the hand. of
a utomobile was pushed down
^ rac jj by ^he train for some dis
^ nce None of the occupants were
thrown out .
The Y. & M. V. crossing at the sta- the
tion was locked and the traffic was
congestec i at this point. When the
track was cleared and Mrs. Majet not
started her car and reached the Sou
thern crossing, owing to the many
automobiles there, she failed to see
' the approach of the Southern train,
to
As she drove onto the track, her en
gine died and the automobile
struck by the train.
The car was badly damaged, the
exact extent of which has not been
was
i
of
be
determined.
•o
Child Was Painfully
Burned Wednesday
it
Hortense Lott, five year old daugh
ter of Mr. and Mrs. W . E. Lott, who
reside at 504 George Street, was pain
fully burned Wednesday, when her
clothing caught on fire from an open
The little girl was standing in
grate.
front of the fire place with her night
close to the
gown on and got too
blaze. When her clothing became ig
nited she ran into another room and
_badly burned before her mother
reached her and smothered out the
flames. The ehild's injuries, while
not serious are most painful. She was
reported to be getting along nieély
»
-o
City
For
The Gty School, were
day in order that the pu
at
enjoy the <
a
—I'
The End of m Perfect Day
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(Coprrt«in>
EINSTEIN TESTS
AND HYPOTHESIS
Had
Dr. Michelson Says The Subject Of
Relativity Belongs To The Realm
Of Higher Physics.
one
this
Associated Press
j
it is in motion than when it is at si
rest.» ~ H^
and
°
.
CHICAGO, Dec. 19—Dr. A. A. Mic
helson, of the University of Chicago,
says that anyone holding the new
Einstein theory of. "Relativity" must
also accept the following conclusions:
A yardstick is shorter when it is
pointing east and west than it is when
it is pointing north and south.
A clock will run slower when it is
44
being moved than when it is standing,
"A mass of matter is greater when
44
Dr. Michelson was winner of the
$40,000 Nobel prize for physics in
19T7. His investigations in the action
of light brought on the discussion
leading up to the Einstein tests and
which have aroused so
hypothesis
much comment in the scientific world.
Dr. Michelson Stated that the con
sequences Einstein theory are radical
and then he told the effect it would
have on the yardstick, clock and solid ^
body. But he added that we need not j
get excited about it, even if Einstein
is right. .at
"The movement of the earth is
small when compared to the velocity ^
of light and for all practical purposes
might be disregarded," he said. The ^.
subject of relativity belongs to the p
realm of higher physics, but never
theless, is an important matter and
the Einstein theory is to be seriously
reckoned with.
Professor Michelson, however, does
not as yet accept the theory as it is
taught by the great Swiss mathemat
ician, because it does away with the
idea of light traveling by means of the
vibrations in either which is supposed
to fill all space.
"Einstein thinks that there is
declared the
n _ d-j 4-_ rp__j_
Promise Better lTain
Equipment on Southern
--
In response to complaints made by
the Chamber of Commerce, Superin
tendent Patton of. the Southern Rail
way has wired Secretary F Herr, that
he will increase the equipment on the
Southern passenger trains during the
Widavs. - v
P.
»
A
no
9t
such thing as ether,
Chicago professor. "He does not at
tempt to account for the transmission
of light, but he holds that ether should
be thrown overboard. Ether gives us
reference point for motion, but
some
according to the Einstein theory all
motion is relative. However, I believe
it is possible, with certain modifica
tions of this hypothesis, to square it
with the ether theory and the necess
ity of,some medium for the trans
mission of light. Then my main ob
jection would be removed.
ft
■Or
I>0 YOITR CHOPPING NOWL:
>. rr !:
ONÎ.T . DAYS
*
r
JT you win aat
' v -
*
15^
m:
TSSmBGwk
£?■
r s
MR. L ARTERBURY
DIED YESTERDAY
Had Been A Resident Of Greenwood
For 25 Years—FuneraL Was
Held This Motning.
;
Mr. Lee Arterbury, 45 years old,
one of the leading real estate men of
this city and county, died yesterday
afternoon at 3 o'clock at his home in
_ ,. ...
West Greenwood after a months ül- ,
_ , , , . _ .
j GSS e f. 4. if OU T . via sever
days Mr Arterbury hud been grad
ually £a.l.ng and no hoge was enter
tamed for his recovery.
_, . ^ t . tt„„
y er was : ^ m J
emsko, Miss. He came to Gr^nwood
wen y ive years ago e
si des h^wifejwho^a ÿmnerly Miss!
illm an of
Ä j" T Atobu'S of^Green
, ' m , , - r, __the
wood and V T. Arterbury of Cruger,
and one s.ster, Mr,. Charley Weaver
° ._ 1S . , i a .
Mr. Arterbury had many loyal
. . , . _ * v , t —.ri_of
friends in Greenwood and Leflore
«
county jj e was a progressive busi
negs man an< j a good citizen. Mr. Ar
terbury was a mem ber of the Metho
^ c b U rch of this city. He also be
j on g e( j to the Odd Fellows Lodge,
>phe funeral was held this morning
.at 10:30 o'clock at the Baptist church.
serv j ce was conducted by Rev. W.
^ <j«y ree> Interment was made in
^ Fellows Cemetery. The ac
^. ye p a jj_| >earers were: Messrs. Arch
p eteetj j k g Emmons, L. N. Chand
^ j ohn Ashcraft, Roy Bew, A. M.
Payne; honorary pall-bearers: Messrs.
Sharkey Pate, Tom Lucas,' W.
Hamner, Capt. Walter Pillow, Dr. J.
P. Bates, Dr. S. L. Brister, Dr. W. B.
M.
Dickins.
-o
;
Thev Can Keen Him!
J __ I
_
j
The Prince's welcome in New York, |
the Globe added, "was the real thing
coming from, perhaps, the most
warm-hearted people in the world,
They have much to teach him of the
warmth of that friendship which mis
eWef-makers break açd he had some
what to teach them about institutions
which, it may be, they have occasion
ly misunderstood.
"The only thing waited to make the
friendship of Britain and America in
pregnable is that they should know
one another better than they do. To
help on that work was the Prince s
mission.'* ^ ;
-o
A Fine Fellow But
19—The warmth
LONDON, Dec.
of America's welcome to the Prince of
Wales moved The Globe to remark
Americans will please
44
humorously,
remember that he is our Pnnce, not
theirs." The paper explains that the
Americans gave the .Prince such a re
ception that "anybody might be ex
cused for fearin gthat they had some
annexationist designs in view.
ft
»»»♦» ♦ ♦♦»♦» » »»»»» » a
most
ciples
PLANS FOR THE
CELEBRATION OF
300th Anniversary Of The Pilgrim
Fathers Announced For England,
Holland And United States.
a
Associated Press
NEW YORK, Dec. 19—The 300th
anniversary of the Pilgrim Fathers, an
tentative plans of which have just
, , , ......
been announced here, will include
ce ]ebrabions in England, Holland and:
United States entire]
^ ^ Decembcr 1920
: . , T j
A four-day program m Leyden,
Amsterdam and Rotterdam, whence
^ p . lgrims three
ago the American wilderness where
"freedom to worship
ÄÄS
^ " **
University of Leyden. Address
commcmo „ tive o{ the Mcasion wiu
^ delivered by scho]ars from
three countries, including the rector
.' „ _, , tt 0 ^-,
the university. Dr. Rendel Harris
. . v, ... . D
0 f Manchester Eng., Viscount Bryce
and a famous American who has not
ed
the
and
the
the
yet been designated.
The next day, August 31, the birth
day of the Queen of the Netherlands,
wil linclude, besides a Congress in the
Hall, a religious memorial service in
the Pieterskirk in which the Rev.
JohnRobinson, who led the separa
tionists from the Church of England
(the Pilgrims) to Holland in 1609,
was buried.
One of the features of th eholiday
at Amsterdam on September 1, will
be a meeting in the Rijksmuseum,
the unveiling of a memorial window
in the Bagijnekerk and a reception.
The next day there will be an aqua
tic pageant in Rotterdam, the visit
ors traveling in the morning from
; Leyden to Delftshaven, if possible, by j
boat along the way the Pilgrims went.;
I Then there wil lbe trips to the reli-|May
gious havens of Rotterdam, a mem- !
orial service in the church at Delfts
haven and at 7 p. m. the English and
American contingents will depart for
Southampton.'
The celebration in
start in May 1920, with meetings in
Scrooby, the home of Robinson, Aus
terfield, Boston and Sheffield, From
August 4 to September 20 there will
j be ceremonies in Cambridge, London,
| s ou thampton and other places, culm
inating in the sailing of the new
Mayflower, which will carry the
^ r ning America ncommittee and Brit
an{ j jj^tch delegations who are to
participate in the program on this side
of ^e Atlantic.
jf a in events of the American cele-
bration wfli be in Plymouth, Mass.,
an d Boston, where historical pageants
the ^ ^ heM> followed by a big recep
in- üon New York. Vice-president
Marshall is Honorary Chairman of the
To committee having the local program
s ^ charge . The foreign visitors will
; then be taken on a toùr of the United
. On Nevember 24, 1920, there
will be a universal of Thanksgiving
Day in Fin glund, Holland and,the^Un
ited
*
*
*
England will
a
!:
*
-o
The Census Bureau prints t specia
for each State in the Un
containing all the census figure
(dating to the State in question;
►I A
o
drive "T. B." away! Buy
of dozen stamps bough
'» 1
z
CREATION OF AN
INTERNATIONAL
Police Force Is Suggested- By Major
David Davies, A Member of the
British Parliament.
!
Associated Press
LONLON, Dec. 19—Creation of an
international police force is suggest
ed by Major David Davies ,a member a
of Parliament. He told the Grotius
Society that each nation should have
a sufficient army to maintain internal j
order and furnish its quota when the
League of Nations required it; that
no nation should employ a new wea
pon of war; and that each nation
should provide the League of Nations :
with an adequate force for immediate
j
These units should be concentrated
in the different parts of the world
and the naval portion similarly con- j
stitued. Poison gas, war planes, sub-;
marines, heavy artillery and tanks ;
should be ceded to the League to form
the headquarters force and no state
should be allowed to own them or to
make use of any new invention for ;
war-like purposes, he said.
Major Davies said the greatest re- !
sistance to the suggestion probably
now would be found in America
"which was- the more saddening be
use.
:
cause the President of the great re
public was one of the earliest and
most powerful exponents of the prin-|
ciples of the League." I
1
. . mit/ri *
First Aviator 1 O Make ;
_ t «,
JNOn-ötOP t llgnt nies
-o
Associated Press
ROUEN FRANCE, Dec. 19—Capt.
Alcoco, the first aviator to make a |
the
non-stop airplane flight across
Atlantic, died here this afternoon, as j
a result of an injury he received in |
airplane accident yesterday.
an
I
Of Commission
j
-o
Name Two Members
ed
Associated Pres?.
WASHINGTON, Dec. la— J onn P. !
White, former president o r the Unit-'
ed Mine Workers of Amer»*;.* ^
Rembrandt Peale, an Independr^u
öperatcrrrwill- b« »uomü«!
the commission to investigate wagfes
and prices in the bituminous'coal in
dustry, according to unofficial reports
today. Peale and White assisted the
Fuel Administra
Garfield caring
1
* *
in
the war.
O
******** ****
j an . . . 38.25!38.50|38.00!38.45|38.08|
Mar. - - j35.21 i 35.T2;35-11 ^35.58 35.12j j
reli-|May - - 33.09|33.47l32.85 |33.33j32.90|
! closed 37 to 46 up.
j^ ew Orleans Spots 40.00.
*
*
* COTTON MARKETS*
* *
**************
NEW YORK COTTON MARKET
Prev.
Open High Low Close C ose
36.85137.02 j36.50;36.89136773 ;
34.68135.00| 34.36 j 34.82134.52
May - - 32.40:32.75:32.20 32.68;32.30 j 1
Closed 16 to 38 up.
New York Spots 39.25.
Jan. -
Mar. -
:
NEW ORLEANS COTTON MARKET
Prev.
Open High Low Close C ose
-o
GREENWOOD COTTON RECEIPTS.
1918-19 receipts .
1917-18 receipts ..
Since Sept. 1, 1919 .
Same date last year
Week ending Dec. 18, ....
Same week last year ....
Stock on hand now .
Same date last year ....
.160,064
.133,197
.. 92,579
.108,755
3,438
. 4,188
.. 36,655
.. 46,550
o
*
* THE WEATHER *
* *
**************
MISSISSIPPI—Local rains Friday,
cölder Friday night; Saturday fairj
and colder.
i
Local Observations.
TEMPERATURE—Highest, 59 de-|
grees; lowest, 35 degrees; précipita-;^«
tion .23 ;river gauge 33.7; change in
24 hours 0.0.
Miss Annie Long Stephens,
Local Observer.
-o
;
United States marshals acted as en
imerators at the first nine decennial
Each had* as many
misuses.
assistants as were necessary to prop
riy cover his allotted territory.
-o
Christmas seals, sold here and ev
e ry w h ere in Mississippi, cost one cent
Buy then!
"7.
■'é;..
GOVT. WON FIGBT
SAYS GEN. PALMER
I
4
The Termination Of The Strike Of
The Bituminous Workers Was Vic
tory For Government.
Associated Press
WASHINGTON, Dec. 19—The ter
mination of the soft coal strike is not
a settlement but a victory for the
government, Attorney General Pal
mer told the Senate Sub-Committee
investigating the strike. "The gov
eminent won its fight," Palmer said.
"There was no settlement in actual
ity, the men and officers complied
with our demands and returned to
work,
»»
General Palmer said no promise
had been given the Union officials
that further prosecution would not
be commenced against them. General
Palmer said in his conference with
Acting President Lewis and Secret
ary Green of the Mine Workers, which
resulted in, the ending of the strike,
he told the Union officials that if the
men went back to work, the Presidtn's
assurance of a fair settlement would
ise, no concessions with the men,
Palmer said, "except that the Presi
dent's statement of December first."
I made no comprom
be carried out.
u
»»
Mr. Palmer said the testimony he
considered in the Federal Court Or
der issued at Indianapolis was not
obeyed in good faith by the Union of
ficials and the Grand Judy investiga
tion is still going on.
Mr. Palmer said there is no mater
ial difference between the plan ad
vaneed by Dr. Garfield, who proposed
the miners return to work under the
wage increase and the President's
plan.
. n . T
| Socialist Candidate III
Milwaukee Election
o
j
|
Associated Press
MILWAUKEE, Wis., Dec. 19—Vic
tor L. Berger, Socialist, who recent
I ly was refused a seat in Congress, is
« candidate in the special election to
j day to fill the vacancy in the Fifth
Congressional District. He is oppos
ed by Henry H. Bodenstaba, fusion
! nominee.
ChjlFffBS Mine Owner*
Wifli
-o
O
Associated Press
MIDDLESBORO, Dec. 19—Discrim
ination against the miners by the
owners- of District No. 19, em
1 mine
bracing parts of Kentucky, Tennessee
and Virginia is charged by V. A. Kel
lar, district president of the United
Mine Workers. He said 8,000 miners
in the field had been discharged be
j
cause of union activity.
-o
Severe Fighting On
Esthonian Front
1
Associated Press
LONDON, Dec. 19—There is sev
fighting in the vicinity of Narva
the Esthonian front where the
Bolsheviki broke the wire defenses
and captured several villages,
cording to an official Soviet Govern
ment statement.
: ere
on
ac
o
To Take Steps Check
Rising Price Clothing
Associated Press
WASHINGTON, Dec. 19—Assist
tant Attorney General Figg announc
es a conference of persons interested
in the production of wearing apparel
called to meet in Washington early
in January to discuss steps to check
the rising price of clothing.
o
Try Assassinate The
Irish Lord Lieutenant
*
*
*
Associated Press
'DUBLIN, Dec. 19—An attempt was
made this morning to assassinate Vis
count French, Lord Lieutenant of Ire
land Tbe sbot
fired at Lord
was
i French as he was driving to the Vice
Regal Lodge. The bullet killed a civ
ilian and a policeman was wounded.
de-|
Mpmhpra CÎTPW
in Ao M dH Der S l^reW
o
Drowned At Sea
Associated Press
HALIFAX, Dec. 19—Forty three
; members of the craw of the British
en
Freighter Manxman was drowned at
and the ship supposed to have
gone down, according to n wird
message received at Camperdown Sta
tion. The survivors of the ship are
aboard the ship the Steamer British
Ide, due in New York -today.
sea
ev-

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