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Greenwood daily commonwealth. (Greenwood, Miss.) 1919-1926, December 20, 1919, Image 1

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PUBLISHED EVERY AFTERNOON* EXCEPT SUNDAY
J. L. & S. GILLESPIE, Editors and Publishers
7
ASSOCIATED PRESS NEWS SERVICE
-4L
J
VOLUME 4—NUMBER 96
GREENWOOD, LEFLORE COUNTY, MISSISSIPPI, SATURDAY AFTERNOON, DECEMBER 20, 1919
SUBSCRIPTION:
SINGLE
COPY
f SÉ
drainage and
FLOOD CONTROL 1
/
Meeting In Greenwood, Dec. 30th, For
The Yazoo Deltfc—Congressman
Humphreys Will Be Present.
!
A meeting of all those interested
i^Yazoo Delta Drainage and Flood
Control, with a view of affording
Congressman B. G. Humphreys an op
portunity to confer with them, will be
held at the Courthouse in Greenwood,
Miss., at ten a. m.. on
These are matters of
30th.!
Dec.
more serious
concern to the lower part <^f the Delta
than to the upper, and it is hoped that !
all points from Greenwood South that!
are concerned will be ably represent-;
Hon. B. G. Humphreys has introd- i
uced a bill in Congress calling for a j
survey of the Yazoo river and all its
tributaries. Not only must drainage!
and flood problems be taken care of,
but navigation as well.
The Chamber of Commerce is very
anxious that a full and representative
meeting of all intrests concerned will
ed.
be had on this occasion. It is under
stood that already plans are being
made by private interests for dump
ing the floods of the entire upper
Pelta into the Yazoo river about three
miles north of Greeiwood. With con
ditions prevailing
mean a fifteen foot levee through
Greenwood an don south, with pump
ing propositions for drainage, and it
would also mean a lack of navigable
water six to eight months of the year.
now this would
HOUSE BILL NO.
An act to authorize the Board of Mis
sissippi Levee Commissioners in its
discretion to take into its district
the territory south thereof, between
11 the intersection of the Yazoo River
and Mississippi River and the south
line of the present levee of said dis
thereof as
they any deem best, and to con
struct and maintain a levee there
eiij and to authorize the Board
of Levee CommissKmers for the
Yazoo-Mississippi Delta in its dis
cretion to contribute money of the
district for tbç, erection and main
teaance of said fine of lqwee.
■"The said levee to be constructed
east of the Mississippi river and
west of the channel of the ^Tazoo
River, connecting with the Missis
sippi Levee district at or near
Brunswick, Warren County, Missis
sippi, running in a southerly direc
tion to, or near the west bank of
the Yazoo canal, near Vicksburg,
Mississippi, and to provide for the
issuance of bonds, and the levying
of taxes for the construction and
maintenance of said levee, and for
other purposes.
Sec. 1.—Be it enacted by the legis
lature of the state of Mississippi, that
triefe, er Buch parts
for the material benefit, and protec
tion of certain lands, situated within
the two levee districts herein men
tioned, from overflow from back
water, and from other causes, the
Board of Mississippi Levee Commis
hereby authorized and
sioners are
empowdered ,by resolutions entered
their minutes, to take into the
upon
said levpe district, as a part there
of, all lands now embraced in the
Warren County Levee District, and
to build and maintain in the said ter
ritory a line of levee in th^ discre
tion of the said Board of Mississippi
- Levee Commissioners, and they are
especially authorized and empower
ed to expend money, and to issue
bonds ,as authorized, in order to pro
vide for the same if necessary to con
struct and maintain the said levee
east of the Mississippi River, and west
of the present channel of the Yazoo
River, connecting with the Mississippi
River, and »running in a southerly
direction, to or near the west bank
of the Yazoo canal, near Vicksburg,
Mississippi.
Sec. 2. That the Board of Levee
Commissioners for the Yazoo-Missis
sippi Delta, be, and they are here
by authorized and empowered, in their
- discretion, to co-operate in the con
struction of said levee, with the said
Board of Mississippi Levee Commis
sioners, and each of the said boards
to authorised to co-operate with the
other in said construction, and to
share the expenses of the same in
such
proportions as each max deem
proper, or, the -said board of Missis
sippi Levee Commissioners may co
ppoate separately yot jointly, Vith
the Warren County Levee Board in
with the consti
of the federal gov
terms as may be
it OB
v ,
of
7.
id of I*vee
for the t
» for
for that purp«
of
-
•aid
tax collections
1 ABOUT COMPLETE

Sheriff T. C. Garrott Has Collected To j
Date $450,000, Leaving a Balance
of About $100,000 Unpaid.
Sheriff T. C. Garrott and his
sistants have been as busy qs bees
collecting taxes the past two months
—total to date aggregating in round
figures the enormous sum of "$450,
000, leaving only about $100,000 more
as
to collect.
Heretofore the collection of taxes
has been slow on account of the sher
iffs not exacting damages until they
were forced to advertise the delin
quer.t list. However, after the first
of next January the county officers
will begin working on a salary basis
—all fees being paid into the treas
ury—and consequently they will be
compelled to assess and collect dam-!
ages from all who are delinquent for ■
i
taxes ,hence the promptness in pay
ments this yea'r.
An interesting item was gleaned
from the Sheriff's list of those who'
are assessed with State income tax
in Leflore county. Mr. Walter S.
Wingfield, of Shellmound, is not "the
richest man in the county but he ren
dered his income assessment at $46,
000—by far the largest assessment,
of any other individual in the county. |
Has Bigger Christmas
Trade Tljan Last Year
Despite the fact that the inclem
ency of the weather for the past few
weeks has been detrimental to the
Christmas trade of the Greenwood
j
ing levee^ therein, is hereby confer-,
red upon the said levee board for
the purpose of constructing the above;
mentioned levee, and this power of,
appropriation may be exercised, and;
the expenses of construction paid ini
tions.
such proportions as may be agreed j
upon jointly by the said two levee
merchants, one business man who con
ducts a large establishment in this
city, stated this morning that his bus
iness
had far exceded that of last
year and he had no complaint to make.
"From last January 1st until June
1st, I did more business than I ex
pected to do in the whole year," the
merchant declared.
He stated that
there was a greater demand than ever
before for high grade stuff and the
sales in this had been enormous. He
said however, that trade in the cheap
er lines had fallen short of expecta
*ty in their district for the purpos^ of
constructing, maintaining and repair
boards,, or Separately ,by the said
Board of Mississippi Levee Commis
sioners, or in conjunction with the
Warren County Levee Board.
.
Sec. 4. That nothing jn this act
shall be deemed to be mandatory
upon either of the said levee boards,
but that it shall be optional with the
said Board of Mississippi Levee Com-|
missioners to act thereon, and shall
be optional with the said Board of
Levee Commissioners for the Yazoo
Mississippi Delta, whether or not, or
in what proportion it shall con- «
tribute to the construction of said
levee.
Sec. 5. That the said Board of
Levee Commissioners for the Yazoo
if it shall co
of its district at an equal rate
taxation equally and rateably in
of the counties of the said levee dis '
Sec. 6. That the said Board of
Levee Commissioners for the Yazoo
Mississippi Delta, be and they are
hereby empowered and authorized,
in their discretion to issue bonds in
such sums as they may deem Proper,
not exceeding .in an amount in
any one year for the purpose of de
fraying any expense of any appro
priation that they may make under
this law, towards the construction of
the said line of levee, the bonds to
be issued and payable as pow pro
vided by law, and the proceeds there
of to be expended solely in tl
struction of the said line of
or the payments for damage for
rights of way thereof, and the bonds
shall be a lien upon all the taxable
property within the district of the
said last named levee board, and
shaB be paid by a special levy or lev
ies of' taxation levied equally and
all ef tike taxable prop
ety in the last named district wttfc
d to the situation of said
Mississippi Delta,
operate with the said Board of Mis
sissippi Levee Commissioners in the
construction of the said levee, shall
pay all money which it so contributes
for either of said purposes by bonds
to be paid for by special taxes le
vied upon the total taxable property
in
con
of
out
of
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ON OIL TANKER
30 LIVES LOST
One Member Of The Crew And An
i
!
!
i
BANDON, Oregon, Dec. 20—At
least thirty lives were lost when the !
oil tanker Chancellor yvas wrecked off
Cape Blank Thursday night, accord
ing to Earl Dooley, member of the
crew, who with an unidentified man
was washed ashore this morning.
According to Dooley the ship broke
in two soon after striking the reef,
taking thirty men down with it.
About a dozen others
151 succeeded in manning the life
boats, Dooley said, but he and the un
identified were the only ones known
bave reached the shore, leaving a
sccre j n addition to those reported!
g 0ne down with the ship, unaccounted
for
m
Negro Is Swindled
Unidentified Man Were Washed.
Ashore This Morning. *
Associated Press
o
Out Of Pay Check
An old swindle, known as "the pid
g eon game" was again successfully
wor j ce< j j n Greenwood yesterday, and
^]j en Anderson, a negro who is em
pj 0 y e j on the place of Mr. Lee Casey,
wag duped and is the i oser of $ 2 30.
Allen had just received his pay
f or this amount when he was
accosted by a strange negro, who in
ve jgj ed him into believing that he was
« f r 4end and proceeded to loaf a
round with him. They were walking
down the street, when another negro,
w j 1Q wag a party to the swindle, who
wag wa iki n g j n front of them, stopped
and pj^ed up a pocket book, He ex
amined the contents and turning to
Allen and his companion told of his
find and stated that the purse con
tained a thousand dollar bill. The
three decided to say nothing about
their find, change the bill and each
take a third of the thousand dollars,
Then the problem of getting the bill
»Unhanged, WHS discussed. Finally Allen
; surre ndered his check for $230 to one
! of the negroes, who was to cash it, re
^ urn w ^th the change and split with
hig compan i ons . The negro has not
been geen gince nor has Allen'been
aWe to locate his $ 2 30.
The negTO who see med to direct the
swind i e , was described as being coal
. TVrnfl
Associated Press
MIDDLESBOROUGH, Eng., Dec.
20—The Corporation of this town is
considering the use of concrete
ip leosl burial grounds as' being ligh
black, with a long ugly scar on his
neck.
The officers here state that the
swindle is an old game, but is usually
worked successfully a number of times
at Christmas time, just after the ne
have received a settlement and
groes
have considerable money in their pos
session.
Considering Use
Concrete Coffins
mm
EVERY SOLDIER
SAILOR WANTED]
Every white soldier, sailor and ma- j
rine who was a resident of Beat Three» j
Leflore County, Mississippi at the!
time of his enlistment to report to
Monroe McClurg, Junior 225 West
Market Street, Greenwood, Miss.
The citizens of beat three have do
nated $6,500 to be pro-rated among
the white soldier, sailor and marine
of beat three. To secure your pro-rata
you must register and show discharge
papers,
Sunday school at 9 a. m. There will
not be the regular 3rd Sunday of the
ass will be at
Indianola.
Midnight; 2nd Mass at 8 a. m.; 3rd
Mass at 10:30 a. m.; Benediction after
the late Mass. All are cordially in
vited to attend,
of
o
AT THE CATHOLIC CHURCH.
Tomorrow, 4th. Sunday of Advent:
Christmas, Thursday the 25th: Ser
vices will be as follows: 1st Mass at
A beautiful Christmas Crib, donat
ed by Mr. E. Sliman, will be placed
in the Church on Christmas eve and
it will remain there until after Epiph
any. It will be a great attraction es
pecially for the children as they will
see in it for the first time a real rep
resentation of the Nativity of Our
Lord. The group shows the Holy In
fant, the Blessed Mother, St. Joseph,
the Sheperds with a flock of sheep
and the Magi.
JNO. F. CLERICO, Rector.
* 4» * * * *
THE EPISCOPAL CHURCH.
Church of The Nativity. L. W
Rose, Rector. Mrs. F. P. Fox, Organ
ist. Mrs. Lawrence Mehr, Choir Di
rector. Harry Hosmer, Superintend
ent of Church School. The Fourth
Sunday after Trinity. Morning Pray
er, with sermon, at 11 o'clock. Sun
day School at 9:45. Union Services
at the Methodist Church at 7:30 p. m.
On Thursday (Christmas Day) Holy
Communion at 8:30 a. m. and Morn
ing Prayer at 10 o'clock. To any and
all services you are cordially invited.
******
is
HONOR VISITOR WITH PARTY.
Mrs. J. C. Adams entertained in her
usual gracious manner yesterday aft
ernoon, complimentary to her cousin,
Miss Corrine Turnage of Grenada.
Sixteen ladies formed four tables at
bridge. The first favor, a pretty hand
painted tray, was won by Mrs. Dave
Nichols. A similar pretty gift was
presented to the guest of honor. A de
licious salad was served at the close
of the game.
tor, Rev. W. C. Tyree.
There will be no preaching at night
on account of the Union meeting at
the Methodist church.
Sunday School at 9:45 a. m. and B.
Y. P. U. at 6:45 p. m.
******
******
• BAPTIST CHURCH.
Preaching at 11:00 a. m. by the pas
UNION MEETING.
A Union service'will be held at the
Methodist Church Sunday night. The
other churches will iSuspend their ser
vices tomorrow evening and their con
gregations will attend a Union meet
ing at the Methodist Church to wel
come Hie new pastor, Rev. R. A. Tuck
er and bear him speak.
■ ~ . î q .. î
United States marsh a l* acted as
fifest nine decennial
im
wt" '>' r /
PUT FOREIGNERS
ON PROBATION
V
j Chairman Johnson Urges Passage Bill
j
To Deport Aliens and Legislation
For Probationary Entry.
Associated Press
WASHINGTON, Dec. 20—Urging the
passage of the bill to deport aliens,
members of the I. W. W. and organi
zations advocating the overthrow of
the government, Chairman Johnson
of the House Immigration Committee,
today declared in the House that all
foreigners (coming into the United
States ip the future must come only
on probation. His statement indicated
an effort would -be made to pass leg
islation for probationary entry of for
eigners
<y
WOULD SUBSIDIZE
ERECTION HOMES
Proposition Of British Government
To Prevent Building of Wheat Are
Termed "Luxury Houses."
Associated Press
LONDON, Dec. 20—The British
government proposes to subsidize'the
erection of necessary homes for the
people and to prevent the building of
what are characterized
luxury
Tlfc plan has been propos
«
as
houses.
ed to the House of Commons by Dr.
Christopher Addison, Minister of
Health. Dr. Addison proposed that a
subsidy of 150 pounds should be of
fered for each house built within a
99
specified time.
Austen Chamberlain, Chancellor of{
the Exchequer ,announced that the;
Treasury had agreed to lend to locaf
authorities of small communities mon
ey for building purposes ,but that the
authorities of larger communities j
would have to suply their own resour
ces.
!
at
Two difficulties, he said, confront
ed the government, that of obtaining
money and labor and he advised that
public opinion be aroused to obtain
both.
V
Habeas Corpus Trial
D. E. Gordon Today
at
B.
will be tried before Chancery Judge
The habeas corpus trial of D. E.
Gordon, charged with killing Lonnie
Lester, northwest of Itta Bena dur
ing August, was set for this after
noon at the courthouse. The cas
G. E. Williams.
Lester is alleged *to have been shot
three times .by Gordon, the wounds
proving fatal/ The trouble between
the two is said to have resulted over
a crop settlement. Mr .Gordon is a
planter near Itta Bena. He was in
dict»! by the grand jury at the No
vember session and has been in jail
here for several weeks.
j
■o
Mr. Warren Garrott has arrived
home from Lebanon, Tenn., where he
is attending school to spend the hol
idays with his parents.
******
Mr. Robert Magee returned Imme
yesterday from à several days trip to
Chicago.
W
m..
ÿ0.
(R-, »' -
-
Kl-',

SENATE ADOPTS
SUGAR CONTROL
Accept To Compromise to Continue
Sugar Equalization Board Until
June 30th, 1920.
Associated. Press
WASHINGTON, Dec. 20—By a vote
of 50 to 12, the Senate today adopted
the compromise_ bill to continue thP
government control of sugar during
1920, and accepted the Hous, amend
ment increasing the authority of the
United States Sugar Equalization
Board, but limiting its licensing pow
ers to June 30th next.
The sugar measure now goes to the
White House for the President'
proval.
:
s ap
■o
John S. Williams Be
Comptroller Currency
Associated Press
WASHINGTON D,ec. 20
John
Skelton Williams was again nominat
ed by President Wilson today to be the
comptroller of currency.
o
Many Diocese Have
Gone "Over The Top.
99
JACKSON MISS., Dec. 20—Rev. Dr.
Capers, shairman for the Diocese of
Mississippi in the Nation Wide Cam
paign of the Episcopal Church in its
effort to raise $42,000,000 for church
work, has received a wire from the
New York headquarters thht the
following ' dioceses had raised their
quotas:
Virginia, Southern Virginia, West Vir
ginia, North Carolina, South Carolina,
Atlanta, Tennessee, Missouri, West
Texas, East Carolina, and Oklahoma
Incomplete reports from other Dioces
es show that many more have gone
"over the top."
The nation-wide campaign of the
Episcopal church has been under way
since last April. During the inter
vening months the church has carried
on thronghout the United States, an
active campaign of education and in
spiration along the lines of her mis
sion, her needs and opportunities.
With the result as indicated above by
the success thus achieved in the cam
paign, the Episcopaleans have caught
a new vision of the church's work and
their individual obligation as Christ-1
ian men and women. With remarkable
enthusiasm the parishes and dioceses
throughout the country are raising the
amounts apportioned them.
The apportionment for the diocese
of Mississippi is $58,000 a year for
three years. Chairman Capers says it
will be raised.
Pennsylvania, Maryland^
o
o
Incorporated Society
Of Meat Importers
LONDON, Dec. 20—The British In
corporated Society of Meat Importers
blames the government for thé pres
ent high cost of meat in England.
Th4 Society states that the storage
warehouses of the United Kingdom ;
are full and that there is no storage!
space left for cargoes of frozen meat
now arriving "at the rate of 60,000
tons a month.
It is only the fact that the gov
ernment is the holder and only seller
of this meat that keeps it at its pres
9nt exorbitant price," declared the
-
Society.
-o
**************
^
j
*
»COTTON MARKETS*
! * *
**************
NEW YORK COTTON MARKET
Prev.
Open High Low Close C ose
Jan. - - 36.57j36.93j 365/7j36T88136.89
Mar. - - 34.75j34.90j34.50 !34.70j34.82
May - - 32.55|32.7 0 32.42|32.70j32.68
Closed unchanged.
New York Spots 39.25.
.
_ Open High L ow Close C ose
Jan.'-'- 38.50j38.50 38.18|38.25j38.45
Mar. - - 35.35|35.65 35.35|35.40|35.58
May - - ^33.10|33.46 33.10|33.20j3&33
Closed 13. to 20 down.
New Orleans Spots 40.00.
NEW ORLEANS COTTON MARKET
Prev.
a
-o
**************,
*
*
* THE WEATHER *
* *
JF*************
MISSISSIPPI—Partly cloudy and
colder Saturday; Sunday fair.
to
Local Observations.
TEMPERATURE—Highest, 57 de
grees; lowest, 45 degrees; précipita
tion .31 ;'river gauge 33.7; change
24 hours 0.0.
Miss Annie Long Stephens,
Local Observer.
4 -
KNOX SUBMITS
RESOLUTION
Before Foreign Relations Committee.
Democratic Members Indicate That
They Will Oppoae Resolution.
Associated Press
WASHINGTON, Dec. 20—New
lutions to declare a state of peace
retain to the United States any — -«•
erial benefits provided for in the
treaty Of Versailles and to affirm the
government's general support of
practical pian for
an International
Peace League, was laid before the
Foreign Relations Committee today
by Senator Knox. The resolutions
would also declare the general terms
that the United States would continue
closc^relations with the Allies. It
is understood to have the support of
several Republican leaders who sought
to «have the committee report today«
The Democratic members indicated
that they would oppose it.
The redrafted resolution by Senator
Knox to declare a state of peace with
Germany was approved today by the
Senate Foreign Relations Committee
by a vote of seven to three. The mea
sure on which the Senate action will
be sought after the holidays, requires
that unless Germany concedes to the
United States material 'benefits
contained in the treaty of commerce
with the German Nationals, it could
be prohibited by presidential procla
mation.
-o
Socialist Candidate
Defeated Yesterday
Associated Press
MILWAUKEE,. Dec. 20— Complete
yesterday* special
election of the Fifth CoteTMasional
District, show that Victor L. Berger,
Socialist, was defeated by H. Boden
stab, fusion candidate, by a majority
of 4800 votes.
official returns in
■o
9,402,520 Running
Bales Cotton Ginned
Associated Press
WASHINGTON, Dec. 20—Cotton
ginned prioF to December 13th, amo
unted to 9,402,520 running bales, the
Census Bureau announced today. Gin
ning for the same date last year was
10,281 139 running bales.
-O
Special Escort For
Return Dead Soliders
Associated Press
WASHINGTON, Dec. 20—Former
sergeant Willie Sandlin of Syden,
Ky v was appointed special escort for
the return of the dead soldiers from
overseas. Unofficially Sergeant San
dlin ranks next to Sergeant York in
exploits .being credited with killing
twenty four Germans and wounding
and capturing many more.
•o
Thirteen Killled
In Railroad Wreck
Associated Press
. ONAWA, MAINE, Dec. 20—Thir
een persons were killed and a number
njured when a freight train collided
with a train loaded with steerage
mssengers from the Steamship Em
press, of France, on the Canadian
Pacific Railway, near here today.
A Reaction After
The War-Time Boom
:
j
Associated Press
STOCKHOLM, Dec. 20—Reaction
; after the war-time boom, strikes, the
high cost of living, increased taxation
j a d lack of capital, have combined to
; cause a general depression in the Swe
! dish financial market.
Several large financial and com
mercial concerns have recently fail
ed, drawing down with them affiliated
firms. Stock exchange quotations for
j ea< ji n g securities have declined to the
j lowest figures for many-'years,
| N ew ReCOrd For
1
o
Egg Production
CORVALLIS, Ore., Dec. 20—A doz
i en hens at the Oregon Agricultural *
College's farm at Salem, Ore., have
set a new world record for egg pro
duction, James S. Dry den, professor
at the college, has announced.
Each of these hens in one year laid
more than 300 eggs, the best produc
ing 330 and two others 323.
All these hens, according to Pro
fessor Dry den, are of the strain that
several years ago developed Lady .
McDuff, the first hen to have laid
more than 300 eggs a year in a trap
nest. Her record was 80S.
ih
WM
>. , -

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