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Greenwood daily commonwealth. (Greenwood, Miss.) 1919-1926, February 23, 1920, Image 1

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PUBLISHED EVER^ AFTERNOON
GREENWOOD, LEFLORE COUNTY, MISSISSIPPI, MONDAY AFTERNOON, FEBRUARY 23, 1920
EXCEPT SUNDAY
ASSOCIATED PRESS NEWS SERVICE
J. L. & S. GILLESPIE, Editors and Publishers
SUBSCRIPTION: "ggJfSc 'r'&'ÇgMs
VOLUME 4-NUMBER 151
SIGNS REGAINING
HER SUPREMACY
Indicated By Analysis Lloyd's Regis
ter, British Shipyards Show Signs
Regaining Their Supremacy.
Associated Press
LONDON, Feb. 23—An analysis of
Lloyd's Register Returns for the quar
ter ended December 31, made by the
American Chamber of Commerce in
London, indicates that, for the first
time since the United States became a
ship builder on a large scale, British
ship yards show signs of regaining
their former supremacy.
The tonnage now building in the
United Kingdom, says the American
Chamber, exceeds by 27,732 tons that
under present construction in the Un
ited States »where the decrease in the
building of new tonnage amounts to
504,000 tons, as compared with the
figures for September last.
The American Chamber remarks
that the tonnage under construction
may not be so good a basis for judg
ment as the amount of tonnage act
ually launched, and that the United
States is putting ships on the water
quicker than Great Britain.
The United States in 1919 construc
ted 4,735,109 tons as against Britain's
1,951,759 tons but the horsepower rep
resented by the American ships was
only 2,591,210 as against 3,209,040 of
the British. Britain is going in for
high power vessels, while the United
States is building more of the 'tramp'
class.
Review of world tonnage in course
of construction shows a decline of
of about 187,000 tons from the figures
for the September quarter.
<>
Commissioner Elliott
Tenders Resignation
Mr. G. P. Elliott has tendered his
resignation as City Commissioner, but
the same has not yet been accepted.
Mayor Hughston informs us that
Mr. Elliott's resignation will not be
accepted until a later date, inasmuch
as there are certain matters in his de
partment which will need his exper
ienced attention for several weeks lon
ger.
Mr. Elliott's private business inter
ests require all of his personal atten
tion, and besides he contemplates tak
extended vacation next sum
ing an
mer—consequently he determined to
tender his resignation as City Com
His many friends regret
missioner.
that he finds it necessary to retire
from the Commission, in which capa
city he has rendered such faithful
and capable service.
-o
that
ing
The
of
defeated in
of
try
-o
Yazoo City School
Defeats Greenwood
The boys and girls of the Green
wood High School wei-e
two fast games of basket ball in Ya
City last Friday. The girls play
zoo
ed the first game .which resulted in
a score of 15 to 14 in favor of Yazoo,
According to the Yazoo Daily Senti
nel, the boy's game was
fastest ever staged on their court.
The following composed the differ
PTit teams: Greenwood Boys: Dix, Bos
well, Davidson, forwards; Vaughan,
WUliford, centres; McCordy, Weiner,
guards. Yazoo City boys: Bunch,
Middleton, forwards;
centre; Woodruff, Applebaum, Thom-i on
pson, guards. Referee, Kethley; urn
Lackey.
two
by
one of the
Montgomery, j
pire, Foote; timekeeper.
Greenwood Girls: Vardaman, Minyard, e
forwards; Carr, Whittington, Sturgis,
centres; Pitt, Carpenter, Sturgis, |
guards/ Yazoo City Girls: McRaven.jby
Blount, Applebaum, forwards; Blount, j
Stinson, Hollingsworth, centres; Mag-j
ruder, Deese guards. Referee, Foote; j
Umpire, Lumbrick; timekeeper, Lack
ey.
■o
Peggie McPherson
Is Granted Bail
General Monroe McClurg and Hon.
R. C. McBee went to Jackson Satur
day and presented the petition of Peg
gie McPherson to the supreme court
for bail »ending her appeal from her
«conviction for murder in the circuit
«sort, the court here having denied her
sucti [bail. The supreme court very
promptly decided that she was clear
ly entitled to bond. In fact, the Attor
ney General stated to the court that
after reading the record, he saw
reason why she should not be allowed
bond. Her bond will be made today
and she will be at liberty at least un
til the supreme court hears her case
on the murder charge which likely be
several The bond was fixed
te the supreme court at $10,000, the
aaumnt die had given before
I
no
bar conviction.
■o
ÿÇ -
:J'V'
DIPLOMAS GIVEN
HERE YESTERDAY
Impressive Ceremony at the Metho
dist Church at Which French Mem
orial Diplomas Were Presented.
French Memorial Diplomas were
presented to the next of kin of seven
Leflore county men who made the su
preme sacrifice in the great world war
at the Methodist church here last
night. The local post of the Ameri
can Legion arranged the program for
the evening, and a large congregation
was present to witness the impressive
in
a
to
of
for
exercises.
Those who received the diplomas
were: Mr. J. J. Hamrick for his son,
Capt. H. Ward Hamrick; Mr. J. L.
Gillespie for his son Lieut. James Gor
don Gillespie; Dr. I. F. Scott, for his
son Herbert Scott; Gen. S. R. Kees
ler, for his son, Lieut. Sam R. Kees
ler, Jr.; Mr. John Erskine, for his
niece, Miss Margaret Eleanor Kiern,
who died as a Red Cross Nurse in
France; and Mr. E. L. Pentecost,
for his son Lieut. E. L. Pentecost, Jr.
Dr. R. A. Tucker, pastor of the
Methodist church, made a short and
interesting talk and Hon. W. M. Ham
ner made a pleasing talk and deliver
ered the diplomas. The local choirs
rendered appropriate music during the
Dr. W. C. Tyree opened the service
with prayer, and the closing prayer
offered by Dr. Joseph Rennie.
The diplomas for the next of kin of
the colored soldiers of this county
to have been presented at the
was
were
Colored School building yesterday af
ternoon, and appropriate services for
this occasion were held at this place,
but only one diploma was delivered
and that to Hattie Fleming, of Itta
Mr. Arthar Bruce, of the local
of
Bena.
past, American Legion, has about fif
teen diplomas for the colored people
He has not been able
of this county,
to locate the parties to whom these
his
but
that
be
de
lon
diplomas are made.
I
O
TREATMENT FOR
FORAGE POISON
Saved Life Of Lena Delbane, After
Other Members Family Died From
Eating Poisonous Olives.
tak
to
to
it
Associated Press
WASHINGTON, Feb. 23—It was
prepared by veterinary scien
tists of the Bureau of Animal Indus
try for experimental pui'poses
treating forage poisoning
that saved the life of Lena Delbane,
after the other six members of her
family had died from eating poisonous
olives in New York recently »accord
ing to the Department of Agriculture.
The serum was made from the blood
of a sheep that had been immunized
against baciullus botulinus poisoning.
In investigating forage poisoning
of horses the bureau of Animal Indus
try made extensive experiments with
and discovered there
of bacillus
serum
in
of horses
serums
on j n g t G ne in Michigan, one
and t h e third in Montana,
caU sed by "the olive strain.
Is
were
botulinuos.
two strains
They look alike and the poisons they
create produce the same effect, but
immunization against one does not af
foi'd immunization against the other.
The two strains are commonly known
by the govei*nment investigators as
"the cheese
the olive strain" and
j strain." Three instances of olive pois
in Ohio
all
were
The vêt
e rinarians, therefore, were reasonably
certa in that the serum affording pro
| tection against the poison generated
"The olive strain
j tive j n the New York cases, and it
proved to be in the one case where it
j could be given a fair trial.
would be effec
o
State Depositories
For Greenwood
State Treasurer L. S. Rogers has
announced the following State depos
itory banks for Greenwood for the
beginning February 17th, 1920,
which have qualified for the amounts
named:
Greenwood — Bank of Commerce,
$30,000; Greenwood Bank and Trust
Company, $70,000; First National
Bank, $10,000; Wilson Banking Com
pany, $35,000.
un
be NEW YORK, Feb. 23—A cable de
spa tch from Colonel William N. Has
the ke Q to the Committee on Relief in the
Near East states that soup kitchens
at Brivan, Armenian Turkey, now are
I feedings 20,000 daily. This is in add
ition to the cam «f orphanages, hos
vear
-o
Soup Kitchens In
Armenian Turkey
no
Associated Press
IOC
A Hard, bong Winter
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YOU MUST LIST
YOUR WINNINGS
Poker Players And Bettors On Elect
ions Are Not Overlooked In
Payment Of Income Taxes.
G. L. Donald, Mississippi's Collect
or of Internal Revenue, informed the j
The Daily Commonwealth
editor of
that Uncle Sam wants to know how
I much you won at poker or on the elec-1
1919 includes amounts gained in gam-1
bling and on election bets. j
Profits made in violation of laws '
!
Well,
j
Come across, boys. The fellow who j
lost in last year's election bets has!
turned your name in and if you wantj
to have smooth sailing with Uncle;
Sam you had better not fail to report
it in the return you must file by Mar.;
tion last year. "None of his business,"
you say? There's where you're mis
taken. Taxable income for the year
are none the less taxable. So it's up i
penny-ante" boys whose pok
to you
er and election bets are on the right
side of the ledger to come across.
What .about the losers ?
that is different. Illegal losses are
not deductible.
it
15th.
!
i
:
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I
I
AN UNFLATTERING
VIEW OF AMERICA
Is Given In A Recent Interview With
William Oudegeest, Widely Known !
In Labor Circles.
Associated Press
AMSTERDAM, Feb. 23—An unflat
tering view of America is given in an j
interview in the Amsterdam Tele- !
j
!
graaf by William Uudegeest, widely;
known in labor circles, and leader of ;
the Dutch labor pafty, who recently
returned from attending the internat- ;
it
it
ional labor congress at Washington. *
Among other things, according to j
the Telegraaf, Mr. Oudegeest found
that in the United States:
Politics are at this moment on a
level with those of 1840 in Holland.
Economically, America has got to
the stage of 1880.
In the light of culture the Ameri
can still lives in the 18th century.
One gets the impression," the Tel
egraaf quotes Mr. Oudegeest as say
ing, "when he is in America, that he
is in the closing days of nobility,
when the peasants thought their noble
lords the only things of importance in
this world, but with the difference
that the bankers and great business
men take the place of the junkers and
barons.
General education is very low.
People do not read.
64
the
de
the
are
add
hos
ii
M
pitals, refuge camps, etc. Over 600
sets of clothing are being distributed
at Erivan daily. These activities at
Erivan are declared to be typical of
what is being done throughout Arm
enia. Colonel Haskell cables that
there remains much to be done, and
that the situation as to food, clothing,
etc., for the orphanages, hospitals and
other institutions is being met "With
limited resources.
o
Greenwood needs a general street
I

FOUND IN ERROR
SCULPTOR
8tonemason Had to Be Called In to
Shave the Bust of John How
ard Payne.
-
*The man who never had a home"
meaning John Howard Payne, of ]yj
course also ne\ei had a beard. i
When the author of "Home, Sweet
Home" had died in Tunis and his body
was being brought back at the ex
pense of W. W. Corcoran the news- j
papers broke out all over in a beau
tiful something about "the man who i
never had a home and was coming j
And when Mr. Cor- !
home at last.
coran had erected a monument at the
yj^ington 6 amended tee' dedication j
ceremonies, either as privileged spec
tators inside the t^metery or just
plain people packed against the rail- j
ings on the street side—which, gen
erally speaking, folks, is a good place b
to ^ e ' so ^ ar as graveyards are con- ^
cerned—but, anyhow :
The bust of Payne that topped the
marble shaft showed a dreamy face
bearded like unto the gentleman of
western literature usually mentioned !
as a "pard." And everybody said
what a manly man he must have been.
j but—you know how things get around
j w^/e^ver--^say^abouT two weeks—the
town become aware that the late Mr.
Payne never wore a beard. *
And the next thing that happened:
he was shaved by a stonemason.—
Washington Star.
to
Ancient Oath Found.
The Bucks County (Pa.) Historical
! society has come Into the possession
i of a well preserved manuscript copy
of an oath of allegiance and renuncia
tion taken by aliens in this country
about 1730. The allegiance is sworn
: to George II, acclaimed as ruler of
; Great Britain.
I The oath was administered about
I the time that many Germans and
! Swiss were emigrating to this country
and an act was adopted in 1727 set- ;
ting forth that all aliens must take
oath of allegiance to King George.
The oath was administered to all
males over sixteen years as soon after
their arrival in this country as pos
j
!
sible.
j The manuscript which the histori
! cal society has is that of the oath
taken by George Kinkner of South
; auip ton township in 1730.—Nyack
Evening Journal,
; —
j
!
I
Aviation and the Compass.
Many aviators firmly believe that 1
there are magnetic currents or dis- j
turbances in the upper air which .
affect the compass and make It go :
Long experiments and care
;
*
j
crazy.
ful Investigation, however, seem to
prove conclusively that it Is not the
compass, but the plane which moves
distractedly, in the first place, and
that the apparent insanity of the com- :
is due to these movements and
pass
the vertical magnetic component of the
governing force.
The maddest of
the most contradictory
compasses,
and insane of cards,
down to a quiet behavior once the
plane is on a straight, level course for
a period of time greater than the pe
riod of the compass.
will steady
How Needles Are Made.
It was not until after 1885 that
needles were entirely made and finish
ed by machinery. The present-day
process of making needles may be
described as follows: The first opera
tion Is to cut the needle wire into
eight-foot lengths; this Is done by
winding it Into a coil of sixteen feet
circumference and then cutting this
coll Into exact halves with powerful
cutting shears. The coiling of the wire
Is so managed that there are 100
|lec<f in each half when cut.
at
of
A Backhander.
Caller (on being shown photograph)
—So that Is your husband. Is It? I
knew he must be good looking—your
children are so pretty.—Boston Tran
I
RESERVE BOARD
. _ T _ TWT . „ _ __ _ _ _
A1V1V1T A ¥ RFP0RT
IwLil Vil 1 ; The
I bank
| Marie
]yj a{ j e Congress Today. Ask For A-j ted
and
mend ment to Act to Establish
scrip
Maximum Lines of Credit.
en
Associated Press
WASHINGTON, Feb. 23—The de
termination of the Federal Reserve
reserve banking system in regulating
and controlling the credit situation,
[which course was designed to aid com
merce and industry in restoring pre
war equilibrium, was disclosed in the
b oard ' s annual report,
^ 0( j a „
check the expansion and reduce real
tv liquidations.
were made to Congress for an amend-1
me nt to the reserve act to permit re- !
serve banks w,ith the approval of the ; pro
Eed6 ; ral Reserve Board, to establish key
max ^ mum ^ nes credit accomodat- WO
* on ^ or me mber banks. An ascending tinct
scale of rates will be provided in the j s i
event money is borrowed above the? : c
maximum line. Warning was given| sa
the country against too rapid deflat- 1
ion.
Boai'd to exert the full power of the:
public ! And
made
With this announced as the!
peace time policy, the board prepared
to "test the ability of the system to
Recommendations
-O
BIG G0LE MEET
ST. PETERSBURG
i
;
Barnyard Golf" Enthusiasts Entered
National Championship Horse-Shoe
Pitching Tournament Today.
Associated Press
j ST. PETERSBURG, Fla., Feb. 23—
"Barnyard golf" enthusiasts from all ; of
parts of the country were entered in j
! the national championship horse-shoe to
I pitching tournament which began here
today. The contestants, headed by
Fred M. Brust ,of Columbus, Ohio, j
1 national champion, include many of j
j the noted players of the game. Sev- j
. era j teams from Akron, Ohio com- j
: posed Q f stars among employes of i
rubber g 0ods manufacturing concerns, j
; also were entered, their employers !
having announced they would send n
them here in order to encourage the
: sport among the factory workers. The
Akron delegation will attempt to se
the next tournament for that
cure
*
city.
*
The duration of the tournament is
indefinite because of the large entry ^
list, the local club alone having
membership of more than 500,
whom many will contest in the cham
pionship events,
range in age from youths in their ear
ly teens to Ezekiel Barnes, of this
city, an expert 81 years old.
* *
I
of !
The contestants
DEATH OF MATHEW GALEY.
Mr. Matthew Galey died at his home
in Black Hawk Sunday morning at 5
o'clock of acute indigestion. He was
62 years of age. He was buried at the
Black Hawk* cemetery today. He
leaves one brother, Mr. Tom Galey,
Sr., of this city. Mr. John A. Shute,;*
of Greenwood was a brother-in-law.
o
I
o
Mr. W. H. Jones, of Memphis, spent
the first of the week here, the guest
of Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Dennis.
WILSON'S PLAN
IS ASSAILED
Railroad Union Officials and Commit
teemen Discuss the P\pn Proposed
by President.
Associated Press
WASHINGTON, Feb. 23—President
Wilson's proposal for a settlement of
the railroad wage controversy and the
compromise railroad bill now pending
in the Senate, was bitterly assailed
in a conference here today of the rail
road union officials and the grievance
committeemen, who were called to
Washington to discuss the settlement
policy laid down by the President.
ig
-o
Peary Is Buried Wiïh
Full Naval Hoffl
' Associated Press
WASHINGTON, Feb. 23—The body
of Rear Admiral Robert E. Peary, the
discoverer of the North Pole, was laid
to rest in the Arlington cemetery to
day with full naval military honors.
—o
j
Signs Her Name
To Bank Notes
Associated Press
GENEVA > Switzerland, Feb. 23—
; The first woman to sign her name
I bank notes in Switzerland, is Miss
| Marie Prodham, who has been appoin
ted director of the Banque de Geneve,
and will in future sign the notes
, , ,
scrip issued by the bank.
There are now in Switzerland worn
en practising as judges, barristers,
engineers, doctors and university
professors.
o
j
j any
!
! CONSTANTINOPLE, Feb. 23_The
; pro hibition campaign launched in Tur
key and throughout the Mohammedan
WO rld will be conducted along two dis
tinct lines, Abraham Effendi, Shiek-lu
j s i am> spiritual head of the Moslem
: c burch with 300,000,000 adherents,
sa j ( j j n outlining the program of the
1
PROHI CAMPAIGN
IS ON IN TURKEY
! And Throughout The Mohammedan j
he
World—Will Be Conducted Along j ,
Two Distinct Lines.
To
Associated Press
and
tic
campaign:
"We are going to resort to two
sorts of measures .We will urge the
strict application of laws and police
regulations. We are going also to
make a wide campaign about the phy
i sical, moral and social effects of
; drinking. We hope to get successful
It will
results from this campaign,
influence ,of course, all Mohamme
dan countries.
ty,
ty
-o
Recruits Joining
The British Army
LONDON, Feb. 23—Recruits are
joining the British army at the rate
; of 200 per day and many of the men
j whose period of service was about
to expire have re-enlisted.
The crack guards regiments have
blossomed out again in their pre-war
j scarlet coats and beai'skin busbies, in
j stead of khaki,
j According to the Morning Post, the
j regular army is to have its pre-war
of i establishment increased by about 100,
j 000 men, with the ultimate object of
! getting another 500,000 men voluntar
n y to undertake liability for general
service wherf the army
reserve is
needed.
-o
****** ********
*
*
* THE WEATHER *
is
^
«
* * *************
I MISSISSIPPI—Unsettled, probably
•local rains Monday and Tuesday, col
der Monday.
of !
Local Observations.
TEMPERATURE—Highest 70 de
grees; lowest 55 degrees; precipita
tion, none; river gauge 29.6, fall in 24
hours 0.4.
5
the
He
* _*
Shute,;* COTTON MARKETS *
Miss Annie Long Stephen
lineal Observer.
o
**************
*
*
*
**************
No markets today; on account of
Washington's Birthday.
RAILROAD BILL
BEFORE SENATE
iV
Believed lUat Vote Will Come Quick
Peace Treaty Laid Aside
Temporarily.
ly.
Associated Press
WASHINGTON. Feb. 23—The com
promise railroad bill which passed the
house Saturday by a substantial ma
jority, was given the right of way in
the Senate today with its supporters
predicting speedy enactment. The
peace treaty was laid aside temporar
ily.
Despite the statements of the
leaders that they intend to continue
the fight in the Senate and thé bare
possibility^ a filibuster that might
delay the'^-passpge of th^ bill before
March lst,*-tiie debate that the roads
|Pre to revert to {frigate control, the
Senate leaders express the belief that
there will be little debate and that the
vote will come quickly. Co-incident
with the Senate consideration of the
railroad legislation, the general com
mittee of the railway labor organiza
tion, assembled here to discuss Presi
dent Wilson's proposal for disposition
of the pending wage demands.
union
j Oliver Munitions
Case Is Dismissed
Associated Press
KNOXVILLE, TENN.,
to,The Oliver munitions case came to
end today when the government dis
j missed the remaining charges of sab
otage against William J. Oliver and
andjnine defendants, after Federal Judge
verdict of not guilty on the charge of
"fraud" and eleven of the sabotare
jcharges.
Feb.
23
an
I McCall had directed the jury to find
■ The action of the government at
toi'neys in dismissing the
The action of the government at
toi'neys in dismissing the case was
taken before the defense presented
any evidence. Oliver and nine super
intendents and the foreman of his
plant were arrested just before the
armistice was signed, charged vvith
having passed off on the govern mer.t,
defective shells. Oliver vigorously de
j nied the charges and asserted that he
he was the victim of a frame up" bv
j , abor agitators .
o
To Make Notes Public
In a Few Days Time
Associated Press
WASHINGTON,
Feb. 23—It was
officially stated today that the notes
exchanged between the United States
and the entente powers on the Adria
tic question will be made public by
President Wilson in a few days.
-o
Prohibition Agents
Start on "Clean Up.
Associated Press
CHICAGO, Feb 23.—Major
Daley
mple, Federal Prohibtion Director of
the Central States, gathered thirty
picked agents today preparatory to
leading an expedition into Iron coun
ty, Michigan, to "clean up' the eoun
ty and to arrest a number of officials
who are said to have interfered with
the Federal liquor raid last week.
-o
IS LITTLE IN THE
CLAIM OF JAPAN
That She Was Being Deprived of
Privileges Enjoyed Under German
Rule In Pacific Islands.
Associated Press
SYDNEY, Australia, Feb. 23—Sir
Joseph Cook, Minister of the Navy,
asserted in a speech the other day that
there was "little in Japans claim that
she was being deprived of privileges
she had enjoyed under German rule in
the Pacific Islands.
"She has a similar mandate over
islands north of the Equator, continu
ed Sir Joseph. "Here she has the
same rights and privileges that we
have in ours. I hope the point will
not be pressed. It is vital to us in
every way and goes right to the heart
of our life in these seas. I hope the
incident will pass and that in the fu
ture we will live in good fellowship.
Japan told us at the Peace Confer
ence that she would reserve the right
to raise the question of racial equality
again in the League of Nations. She
is however, a little previous in raising
it now before the League has begun
to function.
*
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24
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of
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Take the Daily Commonwealth

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