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Greenwood daily commonwealth. (Greenwood, Miss.) 1919-1926, March 16, 1920, Image 1

Image and text provided by Mississippi Department of Archives and History

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87065131/1920-03-16/ed-1/seq-1/

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ASSOCIATED PRESS NEWS SERVICE
IRNOON EXCEPT SUNDAY
PUBLISHED EVERY A
J. L. & S. GILLESPIE, Editors and Publishers
t. SSÄ'- .S
GREENWOOD, LEFLORE COUNTY, MISSISSIPPI, TUESDAY AFTERNOON, MARCH 16, 1920
SUBSCRIPTION:
SINGLE
COPY
PER MONTH 50c
PER YEAR MUO
5c
VOLUME 4-NUMBER 170
ira:
TRYING TO GET
VOTE ON TREATY i
FOR THIS WEEK
Ra ixicciLion
ho Stabilize World
Conditions.
Nee
ary
j ary
j
! ai
SUBSTITUTE HAS
i yet
RAVED WAY VOTE! to
j
Fourteen Democrats In of
Senate Vote With The
Majority.
i
!
! ter
!
I the
' as
Associated Press
WASHINGTON, March 16—The;
Senate leaders Joday worked for an
agreement to vote on the ratification the
of the peace treaty this week with thej
situation admittedly holding many
ity
possibilities, in view of the urgent re
presentations that have been made for
ratifying the treaty to stabilize world
conditions.
The adoption yesterday of a substi
tute reservation to Article Ten by a ec
vote of 56 to 26, has removed the last
obstacle for a vote on the treaty it
self.
Fourteen Democrats voted with
the majority. That number is less
!
than half the strength the ardent rat> j
ification advocates promised to deliv- j
er.
the
a
„„„ , ,
Work on the new $75,000 structure
, «r
to be erected for the Business Worn- ,
.
en s Club of Greenwood, will be com- _
i .. , .. n
menced within the next three or four
. ,
weeks, according to an announcement ,
... ,
which was made last night at the bus
. ..
mess meeting of the organization,
, i , , TT
held in the Club headquarters on How- ,
ard Street. The building will be com
, * , , , « ... , — .
pleted by the first of next year. ,
... , .
The building committee has receiv- L,
. , j? i , . , , 1
ed a number of pians, which are be -1
... , ,, ... ,
mg considered and the some will bei
, , .... _ .
decided upon within a few days.
, ,, , , ... i the
The next meeting of the club will i
, . ., . . .. .
be held in April anil this is the annual !
.. ,. ~ I
meeting ot the first anniversary of ,
. , . , ... a. ... , !
the club. At this time orheers will be ,
, . . I
selected.
„ . ' „ , , , -,
Dainty refreshments were served
last night at the meeting, which were j v
presented to the club by Mrs B. F.l
NEW BUILDING BE
COMMENCED SOON
Work On Structure Of Business Worn
en's Home of Greenwood Will
Start In Few Weeks.
Dulweber.
o
Interesting Meeting Of
The Knights Of Pythais
Leflore Lodge No. 46 K. of P. had
a special called meeting last night at
the lodge rooms which was well at
tended. After the initiation of one
candidate into the rank of page, the
members were pleased with short
talks by several visiting and home
breth ren.
Hon. H. M. Quin, Grand Keeper of
Records and Seals, was the guest of
the lodge for the day, gave those pres
ent some interesting information as
to what Pythians are now doing in
this State. Mr. M. D. Abbey, past
Grand Chancellor of this state, was in
the city and was a welcome visitor to
the lodge. Dr. G. B. Stewart, of Man
chester, past Chancellor Commander
of Leflore lodge also attended the
meeting.
-o
City Streets Being
Put Good Condition
All of the city streets of Greenwood
are being gone over with the heavy
grader and streets maintainer and are
being put in first class condition.
Several of the streets have been gone
over a, number of times and this work
will be continued until they are in
first class shape. One of the City
Commissioners stated this morning
that considering the bad weather that
had prevailed here for several mon
ths past, that the city streets were in
good condition.
-o
Mr. John Scruggs
Dies Of Pneumonia
Mr. John Scruggs of * near Carroll
ton, died yesterday at 12:30 o'clock
after an illness of five days of pneu
He was a farmer in that sec
monia.
tion and had hosts of friends. Mr.
Scruggs was a brother of Mrs. J. H.
Sutton of Greenwood. The funeral
was held this morning at the home
at 11 o'clock. Interment was made in
Merrill Cemetery, near Carrollton.
I
ROTARY aUB HAS
EXTENSIVE PLANS
Movements On Foot Looking To Bet
terment Of City— H. M. Quin
Guest Of Club At Luncheon.
The plans of the Greenwood Rot
ary Club are wide in scope. They in
elude community work in every phase
ai d while the local organization is
yet in its infancy, it is commencing
to lay the foundation of
many move
ments which will have a tendency to
weld together the business interests
of the city. Composed of energetic
business men, one from each prefes
sion or walk of life, the club will fos
ter and encourage enterprises, the
completion of which will redound to
the best interests of the community
as a whole.
\
Realizing that Greenwood's prosper
the failure of the city to provide
fieient housing accommodations
ity and growth is being hindered by
;f
for
the people who want to make this
their home, the club will endeavor to
work with the Chamber of Commerce
and see if some solution of this prob
lem cannot be reached.
A Community Sing which has prov
ec j so successful in many surrounding
towns is one of the movements the
Club hopes to establish in Greenwood,
The plan is to gather the people to
gether on the courthouse lawn on Sun
j a y afternoons in order that they may
join together in wholesome singing.
WEEKLY LUNCHEON.
Monday the weekly luncheon was
held at the Irving Hotel, was well at
tended and was an enjoyable function.
Hon. H. M. Quin of Meridian, pres
ident of the Rotary Club in that city
was the guest of honor at the lunch
eon. Mr. Quin made a straight for
ward talk to the business men In an
interesting manner he told of some of
the things the Meridian Rotary Club
had accomplished The story of how
a young girl, who graduated from the
high school there and was without
means to get a higher education, was
., , , , .
aided bv the Rotary Club and sent
, ,
through college, was related by Mr.
_ . & ^ . .. .
Quin. Mr. Qum stated that the girl s
work in the college was most credit
, , ,, , , , . ,
(able, that she graduated with honors,
. ,, , , „ .
and recently returned to Meridian,
, , ,, , , . ,
where she was the honored guest of
, , _ ... ,,
. J , . , , .
Another large undertaking was
, , , , , . ... . ,
brought about by the Meridian club
L, , , , , ,
Mr. Qum said, and brought to a suc
. , , . ml . ,
cesstul conclusion. This was the es
„ .. , , . .
tablishment of vocational training in
the Meridian
, , , ,
movement was expensive but under
. , .
the wise and carefully laid plans of
, .
the Rotary Club, the business men of
, . , . , . . ,
the entire town were interested and
now Meridian boasts of being the only
j v . . . ... , .
traln,n * m ,ts h « h scho0, •
:
!
?
R. .
1
Work Among 'Boys Committee—
Gen. Keesler, Chairman; W. R. Hum
phrey, R. C. King, E. L. Whittington.
Relation With International Head
quarters— R. B. Schlater, Chairman;
I. T. McIntyre, Dr. J. R. Moore.
This
School.
High
citv in the state which has vocational
Mr. Quin's talk was full of intér
êt and helpful suggestiaens to the
members. He has had wide experience
as a Rotary worker and is past gov
ernor of the Fourteenth Rotary Dis
trict in which Greenwood is included.
ROTARY COMMITTEES.
Recently committees of the Rotary
lub were appointed. They follow:
Entertainment Committee —C.
Crull, Ch'n; W. L. Craig, G. L. Ray, G.
A. Wade.
Fellowship Committee— E. K. My
rick, Chairman; J. W. Quinn, W. C.
McBee.
Public Affairs Committee—Judge
Hamner, Chairman; J. D. Duncan, Dr.
Dickins, G. A. Wilson, C. E. Wright.
Educational Committee--Prof. Saun
ders, Chairman; John ^Ashcraft, F. P.
Fox.
4
s
■o
EX-SERVICEMEN
TO HAVE SMOKER
Plenty Of Music And Good Cigars
Will Be In Evidence—All Cor
dially Invited.
A smoker will be held for all ex
Service men at the Memorial Build
ing on Wednesday night of this week
at 7:30 o'clock.
Membership cards will be given to
all members of the Post 29 of the
American Legion at this smoker, and
matters of interest will be discussed.
All ex-Service men are cordially in
vited and are strongly urged to attend
this smoker. There will be plenty of
music and good cigars. Do not for
get the date, Wednesday night, Mar.
Hon. Frank E. Everett, of India
Green
17th.
jtola, was among his many
wood friends today.
-o
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■I ■ "
10
01
The Expert Mechanic
1 PONT KNOW WHAT Alii THÉ Ol' ßü*/
SHE PONT 5PEEP VP A4 SHE USfiPTO AH'
I ölVE HER PLÉWTt Of 6AS, — SHE HEATS, J
op qoio:lV,an'>a»ll you listen to id
KNOCK. IN THE PIOTOR ~ u5£t> To & T < &
TWENTY MiLtS ON A MUON/
of GAS, A/OW I POtfTJP^) ^
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**************
*
*
: COTTON MARKETS
*
Oct.
*
**************
NEW YORK COTTON MARKET
Open High Low Close C.'ose
Prev.
I
May - - i37.35|37.44 37.02;37.22j37.09i
July - - j34.40!34.51 j34.12134.31 j34.20
|31.95 j 31.95 j 31.52 j 31.71 j 31.74 j
Closed 3 down to 13 up.
New York Spots 41.00.
:
;
!
NEW ORLEANS COTTON MARKET
Open High Low Close C ose i
Prev !
! i " I — '
- 34.85134.85:34.48 34.61 34.53!
- | , 31.80j'31.81| l 31.40|31.64 31.54 !
May -
July -
Oct.
j
I
Closed unchanged to 13 up.
New Orleans Spots 41.00.
o
NEW ORLEANS COTTON LETTER.
(From J. F. Clark & Co.,
by Abe Silver.)
NEW ORLEANS, Mar. i6—Liver
pool came 40 to 44higher on futures
ïind 48 on spots, but sales are small
er, total, 3,000 bales.
yesterday's developments in the
market were of such convening
-.strength that market action at pre
: sent is based on technical factors rat
! her than the general cotton situation.
Control seems to rest rather exclu
sively with bullish interests owing to
•the exclusiveness of the contract with
respect to delivery. There have been
but a few hundred bales of tenders
against March so far. Tradirfg in the
market consisted mostly of small ;
-.scalping and the market ruled easier
in the second hour, but the possibili
ty of renewed support in old crop
? positions was a check to selling. The
. contrast between technical control
'and general views restricts action,
fhe market rallies easily on moderate
■buying. Spots are reported quiet but
•unchanged.
1 The weather map shows generally
vloudy but no rain except a trace in
Okla. and Miss, warmer except North
west Texas. Outlook is for cloudy
^weather with the probability of some
precipitation over the Northern por
tion and perhaps locally in the East
«ra belt.
j
-o
*
•*
* !
* THE WEATHER
*
r*

4 MISSISSIPPI — Cloudy Tuesday; |
s Vednesday probably rain.
Local Observations !
TEMPERATURE—Highest, 73 de- j
grees; lowest, 55 degrees; pr ecipita
tion 0.0: river gauge 23.2; rise in 24
hours 0 2
OUrS Mi«« Annie Ion» Stenhen !
Local Observer
1
o
THE FIRST CASE
UNDER THELAW
the legislature in March 1917.
Under provisions of this act, which
is said to be the first of its kind in
-the country, a child born out of wed
lock is declared to be the child of its
natural parents, as such is entitled to
FARGO, N. D., March 15—The first
under North Dakota's law enact
case
ed to establish the legitimacy of chil
dren bom out of wedlock has been
completed in Cass country courts and
a child so bom has received its fath
er's name and been declared his legi
timate heir. The . law was passed by
DISCUSS PLANS
DRAINING YAZOO
Supervisor From Several Counties
Meet Ih Greenwood And Outline
Steps To Be Taken .
I
termination that no drainage proposi-1
tion that did not fully and complete-;
ly take care of the problem of navi-1
gation of the Yazoo and Tallahatchie j
manner approved by the !
This feature was em
phasized on any and every occasion.
!
!
i
A meeting of representatives of the
; Yazoo river counties south of and in
! eluding Leflore County, was held here
i yesterday, to consider proposed dram
! a ^ e measures affecting those counties.
There were pres P t twenty-six repre
sentatives, composed of members of
., if a * ■ c
! the ''ar.ous boards of superiors of
j those countie^, and attorneys, and
I members the legislature.
It Was decided that the several
counties should employ competent
counsel and engineering talent to de
termine just where they stood in the
matter, and what the best plans and
procedure under the circumstances
might be. Intense enthusiasm was
manifested.
Messrs. S. L. Gwin and E. L. Moun
ger were chosen attorneys for Leflore
county, and E. L. Brown for Yazoo.
A permanent committee consisting of
one member from each board of sup
ervisors of the counties affected, was
appointed, of which Mr. W. G. Poin-
dexter, of Leflore county, was made
Chairman, and F. Herr, Secretary of
the Greenwood Chamber of Commerce
Secretary. A meeting of this commit-
tee at Greenwood, was set for Tues-
; i a y, April 13th.
it was unanimous decision and de
rivers, in a
proper government engineers, would
be considered.
-o
CHRISTIAN HOME
:
I
j Father Finnerty Delivers A Masterful j
Address At Catholic Church
Last Night.
:
!
The "Christian Home" was the sub
ject of Father Finnerty's sermon at
the Catholic Church last night,
!

|
! " Home ' s ^f et ho ™ e; th ® re ' s T no plac !
j hke h 01 ™*' W&S In
' orceful manner Father Fmnerty dem
onstrated that it is everyone s obhga-;
t- * on ma ^ e * be aome swee t and hap
! Py by the faithful observance of the j
famil y duties- !
1 Tonight at 7:30 o'clock, the subject;
will be "Marriage.
miss this lecture as it is of vital in- j
Nobody should i
terest to society. ;
Come one and all and bring your
Father John F. j
estate jointly with all other legal
in
its
to
friends with you.
Clerico, rector, extends a cordial in
vitation to all of the services.
by
support, shelter and education equal
ly with other children bom in legal
marriage and is entitled to share in
any
heirs.
Suit to establish the natural paren
tage of the child, the law provides,
must be instituted within a year after
birth, the facts in the case to to be
proved as in any other legal action.
This is construed as placing the bur
dsn of proof upon tbe plaintiff.
,- -V . <
w* -k 'I- -I- -I
* ❖ * * *
* WASHINGTON
NEWS LETTER *
*
-L.

•T*
By The Washington Star
Copyright 1920.
*


>Jc
❖ ❖ ❖ 'l<
* ❖ ❖
WASHINGTON, March 16—With
the entire House of Representatives,
one- third of the Senate, and the pres
ident and vice president of the United
States to be elected in November, all
questions at the national capital are
considered in their bearing upon pol
itics. International policies, legisla
tion by Congress and to a certain de
gree the administration of the execu
tive departments are concerned in
such consideration.
Thus it falls out that it is a per
turbed and hért'c life the statesmen,
near-statesmen, politicians, officials
and their followers are leading just
about now and will continue to lead
for some months to come. All observ
ers are agreed that the political situa
tion in the country at large is more
unsettled, uncertain and hard to gauge
than it has been for many years.
Some of the veterans in Congress
ompare it with the troublous times of
181)6, seeming to find many points of
similarity in conditions.
At the hour, or it should rather be
said the moment, for situations change
with remarkable suddenness and
swiftness, interest centers mainly in
President Wilson's endurance contest
with the Senate over the league of
ations; in what constructive legisla
tion Congress may enact; and, of
course, in the uncertainty over presi
dential candidates in both parties,
The possibility of the Senate giv
ing the President, a modified form of
j treaty, unacceptable to him and in
! ducing his withholding it from being
made effective, is the most disturb
ing feature of the general situation in
Washington. That would mean pi'eci
pitating the whole subject of the lea
! gue of nations in to the presidential
and congressional campaign an dcaus
! ing that issue to be the paramount
i one of the national contest
at the
: polls.
That President Wilson is'to take an
I active part in the conduct of party af
j fairs throughout the campaign is now
assured. The President is regarded
as having practically recovered from
: his long illness. That is to say,
! while his physical strength may be
still depleted, no one can charge that
i,i s me ntal vigor is impaired. He can
s till write letters upon international
subjects well up to his old form and
charming in diction as ever.
If it is asked whether he may be a
* , . .,
candid ate for another term the ans
wers are conflicting, depending upon
i be personal opinion of the one inter
j re g ate d. Whether he is or not, there
! is no doubt in any one's mind that he
wi] ] bave much to do with dictating
j ;
as
i Hi e policies of his party of which he
the titular head. The expression !
IS
; 0 f his personal preference for a can
didate would have great weight with
j tbe ran k and file, it is admitted.
The best judgment in Washington
is that the President's future course,
to the policies of the democratic
party, will depend largely upon the
outcome of the treaty consideration
in the Senate. Some definite outcome
in this direction is expected within
ten days, at the outside.
In Congress, the main|questions
late to expenditures, to taxation, to
the cost of living, and to something to
be done in recognition of the soldiers.
The railroad problem is out of the
Way for the next few months, pend
ing resumption to normal conditions
as
re
INJUNCTION MADE !
IN MEMPHIS TODAY:
Lumbermen Are Enjoined From Fur
ther Exchange Of Stock
Sale Reports.
:
Associated Press
i MEMPHIS, Mar. 16—Federal Jud-,
j ge McCall today granted the applica- j
I tion of the government for a pre
liminary injunction, enjoining more
I than three hundred lumbermen in •
j twenty states from further exchange !
j of the distribution of the stock sales j
: reports and certain other trade state
| ments under "the open competition j
j plan," operated as a statistical aux- !
' iliary of the American Hardwood
j Manufacturers Association, which the j
j government charged tended to res- j
train trade, elnminate competition and
j maintain the prices of the Hardwood
j lumber industry.
I
!
!
i
j
o
ITALIAN WOMEN
BARRED FROM
j
Fifty Position Mostly In State Employ !
By Official Announcement Issued
By The Government.
Associated Press
ROME, Mar. 16—Italian women
have been barred from 50 positions !
mostly in state employ by an official!
announcement just issued by the gov- j
eminent. This order excludes women !
from appointment to the diplomatic
consular service and from becoming
members of the Council of State or of
several courts.
No reason is given for the declara
tion of this ban but Italian observers !
point out that evidently authorities \
believe it none to soon to raise a bar- !
rier against the possible aspirations
of Italian women for public office.
Professor Teresa Labriola, daughter
of the distinguished professor of
Sociology, has lately obtained the
right to practice law before the courts
and, after a struggle of more than
seven years, Dr. Adelina Pertiei, has
obtained permission to perform the
functions of a notary. Those innova
tions have alarmed Italians who hold
conservative views on the appearance
"if women in public life and to this is
attributed in part the new bar against j
women set up by the government.
I
'

j
I
!
!
o
Election Today For
Circuit Court Judge
The special election to name a sue-.
cessor to Circuit Court Judge Elmore,!
!
recently resigned, is being held in
this the Fourth Judicial District I
today.
There are two candidates for the i
position, Messrs. Beams and Davis,
and their respective friends are tak
ing some interest in the contest.
The vote throughout the District
will be very light. At 3 p. m. there
had been polled about 160 votes at
the Greenwood precinct.
•o
Take the Daily Commonwealth
under private ownership of the prop- ;
erties. All admit it will be a tedious
\
proceeding to get the roads back to
where they were when the govern
ment took them over for the exigen- !
cies of the war.
Everybody in Congress wants to do
something for the soldiers, but there i
are wide devergencies of opinion as ;
to what should be done and how it^
should be accomplished.
a
The
one ;
thing all are intent upon avoiding is
to take action which might result in !
accentuating the present financial
and taxation system and lead to fur
ther inflation of credits, with conse
quent pyramiding of the cost of liv
mg.
The stern fact which faces Con
gress is that the normal expendi
tures for the support of the govern- ;
ment although cut to the bone, are
so enormous as to require the contin
of extraordinary taxation for !
i
uance
a long period to come, and to warn!
! against adding to them materially j
None of the statesmen and financiers
to
to
the
in Congress sees hope for material re
of taxes, and consequently les
i
duction
sening of high living cost.
Congress is striving to clear up !
the work of the session so as to ad
joum early in June and let everybody :
get home to take care of their politi
cal fences. The enactment of the nec- ;
essary appropriation bills will con
most of this time, with a few :
sume
general measures edged in between
• * * It is not expected that this
will be productive of very
re
times,
session
much general legislation, therefore,
in addition to the railroad bill, the oil
land leasing bill and the other meas
ures already passed.
2 GOVERNMENTS
STRUGGLING FOR
GERMAN CONTROL
Some Reports Say Neg
otiations Between The
Factions Underway.
ryTi¥¥| 7 «rjQ O i V TViA
^ \ JNO
TPTTri? ü\ DFCTFIY
AIvLJv'IIe CiAI (jC 1 HjU
Hindenburg- Says He Is
Not Connected With
Revolution.
Associated Press
Germany's
governments, the
new one in Berlin and the old
two
one in
Stuttgart, are still locked in a strug
gle for supremacy. While the reports
through Paris today
that negotiations
reiterate
that
are in progress for
a compromise, the Ebert government
in Stuttgart is equally
positive
that no compromise will be consider
ed.
as
On the face of the announcements
b ^ T r ' va l governments, today show
ed them being determined in a con
test for control.
Chancellor Kapp, of the
new gov
ernment, is sitting tight in Berlin, but
he already feels the effect
of
th<'
weapons that the Socialists are using
to combat him, the general strike.
Against this Chancellor Kapp declares
that most drastic measures will
taken. Field Marshal von Hind m
burg, mentioned as the choice of the
JKapp faction for the presidency 7 , is
said by r a Hanover-newspaper to have
publicly declared that he is not con
nected with the Kapp revolution and
disproves of it. Fighting has been re
ported in various points throughout
Germany.
be
DEMANDS RESIGNATIONS.
STUTTGART, March 16—A refus
al to negotiate with the Reactionary
Faction, headed by Dr. Wolgang
Kapp, head of the new government in
Beidin, was decided upon today by the
council of the old cabine 4- , over which
President Ebert preside The uncon
ditional resignation of the leaders of
the new government is demanded by
Ebert.
The cabinet which arrived this aft
ernoon from Dresden and the Nation
al Asembly will meet here Wednes
day. Announcement lias been made
that the Ebert government is in eon
tact with almost all points in Ger
many.
AFFIRM REPORTS.
PARIS, March 16—Dispatches re
ceived by the French Foreign office
today affirm the truth of the reports
that negotiations are going on be
gov
tween the Ebert an<1 the Ka >'» )
ernment.
ERZBERGER IS ARRESTED.
Erz
LONDON, March 16
Matias
bei'ger, former Finance Minister of
the Ebert government, has been ar
rested, according to a Berlin dispatch
dated Monday night to the Exchange
Company,
FIFTEEN KILLED AT STEGLITZ.
Fifteen are re
BERLIN, Mar.
ported killed and many wounded in
the fighting yesterday at Steglitz,
in the southwest outskirts of Berlin.
Four are reported killed and six woun
16
ded at Charlottenburg.
WOMEN KILLED IN HAMBURG.
COPENHAGEN, Mar
Thirty
.16
persons are reported killed, including
women and children,
n the
at Hamburg ge
eivilians, guards and Baltic
fighting yesterday
tween
some
troops.
SOVIET REPUBLIC PROCLAIMED
IN BAVARIA.
AMSTERDAM, March 16—A dis
natch to the Handles Blad from Ber
lin says that a Soviet republic has
been proclaimed at Hof, Bavaria.
PROPOSE VIOLATE TREATY.
GENEVA, Mar. 16—One condition
pvf.posed to the Ebert government by
General Von Luettz was, the demob
ation of the army of the empire
r-rovided by the Versailles treaty,
must not be executed and war mater
1
not destroyed, according to Pre
Bauer of the old government,
sr>
r
sa >' s a Stuttgart dispatch to the ue
Züricher Zeitung. Bauer also quoted
Von Luettz as saying, "the empire
lier
instead should prepare for
war."
a new
Dutch Boat To Guard
-o
Former Crown Princi
Associated Press
THE HAGUE, Mar. 16—A Dutch
torpedo boat has arrived at Weirin
gen Island to guard the former Ger
man crown prince, according to the
Nieuwe Rotterdam-She Courant.
Take the Daily Commonwealth

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