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Greenwood daily commonwealth. (Greenwood, Miss.) 1919-1926, March 16, 1920, Image 3

Image and text provided by Mississippi Department of Archives and History

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87065131/1920-03-16/ed-1/seq-3/

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GREENWOOD THEATRE
ONe Day Only
Matinee and Night
BIG DOUBLE BILL
FRI., MARCH 19
Price 28 and* 55 cents
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DAY'S PLEASURE
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PRICES 28 end 55 cents
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CRULL-KENNEY DRY GOODS ™
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INCORPORATED
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WHOI ESAÏ If
GREENWOOD, MIW
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GREENWOOD THEATRE FRIDAY
MARCH 19.
VICTIMS
RESCUED
. . i
Kidney, Ever, bladder and uric acid
troubles are most dangerous be
cause of their insidious attacks.
„ _ , . i
Heed the nrst warning they give
that they need attention by taking
GOLD MEDAL
The world's standard remedy for these
disorders, will often ward off these dis
and strengthen the body against
further attacks. Three sises, all druggists.
Geld
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Take the Daily Commonwealth
MICKIE SAYS
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<U£ VJ 'NON CiUN WIV40
ßR££2ES IN KÎ4D
I VtAKOS THE BOSS fit LINE OE
J CHATfTELR. 'GOvjT V-US 8IINESS
I'm whm uorut
h-tCr v-sE'S CrOIM' T' DO ,
o'1S O
rEB. 't>OtJh4D ■TVA^S OFFICE*.
f kv*. 'aouf COKlTRrxcTV N
E. SEkR t>0 HT £V?N
(X rREf -T\NO-a\f V.OCM
tuf fv Mt Nio wore; 1
sjvxs -the boss!
Y VJWNf HE
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WILL YOU HELP?
Newspaper reporters find it increas
ingly difficult to run down the
news
happenings of a community. The com
ings and goings of people are not so
easy *° Set as they once were. Once
the reporter haunted the railway sta
tion and picked up much of his new
matter there. But the station no long
er yields up the personal mention i
once did. More people travel by aufe
than by train and so personal event
the gonigs and comings, escape th
eyes of the news gatherer.
That makes it all the more import-
ant that readers turn in their news
terns at the newspaper office. Tha
is the only way to insure that a men-
tion of something interesting which
has happened in or to your household
is duly chronicled.
Take the Daily Commonwealth
LIBRARIANS JOIN
FIGHT ON UNREST
American Library Association In
augurates Nation-wide "Books
for Everybody!" Movement.
WILL AID FOREIGN BORN
I
Social Problems Can Be Solved
by Teaching American Ideals
and Traditions.
!
The spirit of unrest that has been !
sweeping the country indicates that
the foreign born, who have flocked to 1
the United Stntes from every corner of
;
and translator together with the view !
of furnishing the proper hooks in suf
fleient numbers to carry the message
of American ideals and traditions to
1 this vast army of uninformed peo
!
!
the globe have not been given the '
proper help and encouragement, in the
>f the 4,000 librarians who
opinion
j make up the American Library Associ
ation and who are now enlisted in a
! "Books for Everybody" movement.
The effort is a concerted movement
to carry out the Enlarged Program,
! which the association has adopted.
There are approximately fifteen mil
| lions of foreign born in the United
j States and of this number six millions
do not read or speak the English lan- i
One phase of the Enlarged
guage.
Program will he to bring the publisher :
pie. They have been largely dependent
upon the foreign press for their writ
! ten messages. Many men who live
; with their fingers on the pulse of cur- j
rent events are firmly convinced that j
a sound foundation In Americanism
can be easily built among the foreign
born if the proper literature is placed
within their reach in a language they
can understand. I
1
No Drive to Be Held.
In order to carry out the Enlarged j
Program two million dollars will be ;
required. This money will not be |
sought through the medium of a cam- ,
palgn or an intensive drive, but will j
be obtained through the individual ef
forts of the librarians, library trustees
and friends of libraries. The Amer
I lean Library Association will bend
! every effort to bring about the na
j tion-wide adoption of each of the
j cardinal points in the Program, which
includes the extension of the county 11
i brary sytem and the establishment of
1 more industrial and business libraries.
It now has in operation book service
to the United States Merchant Marine,
I Coast Guard, Lighthouse Service and
j hospitals of the United States Public
! Health Service. The needs of the
j 75,000 blind persons in the United
I States will he cared for. At present
the number of books available is woe
| fully inadequate. This will be reme
i died and the joys of good literature
I will be brought into lives that are
(darkened by a veil which will never
be raised by any other method.
Not all the work of Americanization
lies in the great centers of population.
Great sections of the country where In
dustry is carried on by foreign work
ers do no a. ow public library service.
There are important mining state*
where less than a score of libraries
exist. One mining state has but two
public libraries.
MORE BOOKS FOR BLIND.
American Library Association Behind
Movement to Bring Good Litera
ture to Those Who Walk
in the Dark.
There are between 75,000 and 80.000
i blind people in the United States. The
supply of books In the recently adopted
uniform Braille type for their use is in
adequate, there being less than 100 titles
existing in that print.
Library Association has included in the
projects of its Enlarged Program the re
solve to aid in printing and distributing
additional volumes. It has already suc
ceeded in inducing several well-known
authors to finance the brailling of one
more of their books. In inaugurating its
"Books for Everybody!" movement a
fund of $2.000.000 will be raised to car
ry out the provisions of the Program
»he money to he obtained not by a cam
paign or drive but through the efforts o»
the librarians, library trustee* and friend
of libraries.
\
The American
or
GLAD TO TESTIFY
Says Watoga Lady, "As To What
Cardui Has Done For Me, So
As To Help Others.
tt
Watoga, W. Va.— Mrs. S. W. Gladwell.
af this town, says: "When about 15 years
' age, I suffered greatly ... Sometimes
I vould go a month or two, and I had
j îerrible headache, backache, and bearing
I down pa<ns, and would just drag and
had no appet'te. Then ... it would last
. .. two weeks, and was so weakening,
tnd my health was awful.
My mother bought me a bottle of
Cardui, and I began to improve after
taking the first bottle, so kept it up till I
took three ... I gained, and was well
and strong, and I owe it all to Cardui.
I am married now and have 3 children
. .. Have never had to have a doctor for
female trouble, and just resort to Cardui
if I need a tonic. I am glad to testify to
what it has done for me, so as to help
others.
If you are nervous or weak, have head
aches, backaches, or any of the other
ailments so common to women, why not
give Cardui a trial? Recommended by
many physicians. In use over 40 years.
Begin taking Card ti today,
he the very medicine you need.
»
It may
MC- 130
-o
Crop preparations in Leflore
county are progressing splendid-
ly and everything will soon be in
fine shape for planting.
-o--—
RHEUMATISM
m completely washed oui of the sys
tern by the celebrated Shivar Minera
Water. Positively guaranteed k.
money back offer. Tastes fine; cost
a trifle. Delivered in your home by
your druggist or groced. Green woo
Grocery Co., Whole Waie Distributor*
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LIQUOR FLOWS
ACROSS BORDER
Northern Section of Maine Being
Flooded With Whisky
From Canada.
■'v
LAWFUL SEIZURES ARE FEW
I
! Comes Across Line in Ail Forms into
State Which Was Pioneer in "Dry"
Laws—Many Ways of Fool
ing the Sleuths.
!
1
Bangor. Me.—The rate nt which Ca
nadian and Scotch whiskies are flowing
the northern border into Maine
proves that enforcement of the federal
prohibition law hasn't got into its
stride as yet, X*r never in all the his
tory of theoretical droughts have on ses
; been greener, more numerous
together in this pioneer dry state than
right now, when there is more law than
ever before, twice as many "enforcers"
nd increased penalties.
Trainmen who come down say that
whisky of all grades and oceans of
pure grain alcohol are flowing over the
border at a hundred places, and that at
four principal points the alcoholic in
! va ?® n aruouats to Tï a flood ' The f f ° ur
P^nts are Van Buren opposite the
^ Brunswick town of St Leonards,
< ,n tho St - John river ' Fort Kent, which
has **** access to the Canadian village
of Clare via a suspension footbridge;
! Fort Fairfield, which is but nine miles
! distant from the New Brunswick town
of Andover, and Houlton, which is a
ovei
'
or closer I
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j n ^ ar neighbor of the provincial town of
Woodstock.
Only Occasional Seizures.
Occasionally the revenue officers
se * ze a wagon or sled load of whisky
I coming over the international bridge i
1 from St. Leonards or over the ice at
j SOTne more obscure locality, but noih
; ,n S Is saI(i about the great number of
| "booze" chariots that get by the gov
, ernment's lookouts and which keep the !
j speakeasies of Aroostook or the bar
rooms of Bangor supplied. Also, the ;
St. John river being frozen good and
solid for its entire length, men and
teams can cross anywhere in the river's ■
100-mile stretch along the border, so
that, as the revenue men themselves !
admit, a standing army with sentinels j
every fifty feet would he required to
shut out the flood.
There is so much more money to be
made in bringing In "booze," even a ;
few bottles at a time, that hundreds )
of woodsmen have quit swamping roads j
and chopping trees for the ruin-running !
business, and ninety-nine in 100 of
them, knowing the country thoroughly,
get by with their goods.
Price of Canadian Whisky.
Canadian whiskies that can be bought
at $3 a "short quart" on the New
Brunswick side of the line sell In
Aroostook county at $6 and in Bangor j
at $8. while genuine Scotch Is $4 in !
New Brunswick, $8 In Aroostook and 1
$12 to $15 in Bangor. Pure grain alco
hoi, to he had In New Brunswick at $ !
a quart, is "split" with wat^- on this
side of the line, so that every quart
yields about $10. With the addition of
a little prune Juice and burnt sugar,
this alcohol is transformed into "Amer !
supposed to have been j
brought in from Boston or New York !
before the lid went on.
i
lean rye, 1

:
Whatever the outcome of the war on j
"booze," the enforcement of the law |
will be hardest in Maine, both on ac- !
count of the state being cheek by jowl !
with Canada and on account of the
seventy years' experience that the peo
ple here have had In devising ways and
means of fooling the sleuths.
REGENERATE NORTH FRANCE
Large Sums Have Been Advanced to
Restore Industries and Agri
. culture.
Lille.—Perceptible progress toward
the regeneration of northern France j
is shown in reports just made public !
here. From Feb. 1 to Dec. 1, 1919, |
1.250.000. 000 francs were advanced to
manufacturers, and nearly 2,000,000,
000 francs were paid as compensation
for war damages.
500,000 francs
22.000. 000 francs w-ere bought for .
farmers, who in addition received 18,
000 head of horses.
Seed costing 18,
and fertilizers worth
Lighthouse Keeper
Uses Motorcycle
South Norwalk, Conn.—Per
forming a feat without prece
dent in government annals here,
Capt. Richard G. Hendricks,
pervisor of United States lights
in this portion of Long Island
sound, has been making his
rounds for the last few r days on
his motorcycle, taking a supply
of oil In the side car.
The ice has been so thick that
he could not get to them with a
boat, nor could he, on foot, car
ry a sufficient supply of oil. It
is the first time in this state
that a motorcycle has been
used for such a purpose.
SU
Tabbies in Fine Fix.
Toledo, O.—The advertisement of a
local company for black-cat ski s at
50 cents each has caused a reduction
in the visible and audible supply. Pe?
owners have appealed to the polie#
for feline protection.
-o-
ST. PATRICK'S TEA.
The Woman's Auxiliary of Presby
terian Circle No. 5 at the home of
Mrs. R. P. Parish, Wednesday, March
17th, from 3 to 5 o'clock.
Will give a St. Patrick's tea
And great it will be;
Come in your cars,
Come in your hacks;
Bring along silver,
And also greenbacks.
-o
Takt the Daily Commonwealth
GREENWOOD, MISS., MARCH 16, 1920.
E3S
Eggs vs. Government Bonds
Eggs Are Going Up — See?
Grain feeds do not increase egg production, and never will. Why Î
Grain feeds will maintain the body
and supply fats to stimulate yolk de
velopment, but the hen requires rich
protein feeds to stimulate the de
velopment of the whites (albumen,
pure protein) of the eggs.
These are proven scientific facts,
backed by Government and State col?
lége experiment stations.
The average hen requires three,
ounces of feed per day—this should
cost one cent per day' or thirty cents
per month. A hen, properly fed, will
produce a minimum of twelve eggs
per month, worth sixty cents per
month ; profit on your feed bills 100
per cent.
Feeding directions:
Feed l 1 /" oz. Jewel lien Feed
and IV 2 oz. Jewel Egg Mash per
hen per day. Feed the dry mash
in hopper or self-feeders. This
is the profitable way to feed
hens for egg production.
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International Jewel Hen Peed
International Jewel Egg Mash
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INTERN
MADE IN MEMPHIS, under the supervision of university trained experts
with years of successful feed manufacturing experience, in the most modern and
scientifically equipped feed manufacturing plant in the world. They are good
feeds, just as they should be to please you and give profitable returns.
Your money back if you want it. A million dollars back this guarantee.
„ Your dealer has International poultry feeds, or we will gladly supply him.
Packed in 25-pound, 50-pound and 100-pound bags.
Made in Memphis ifl S4W*tootU bQA'dsr b^gs.** The fastest growing feed
market in the world?.



4 l
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LEFLORE GROCER COMPANY
WHOLESALE DISTRIBUTORS

LJ
;
) Letters testamentary having been
j issued on the fifth day of
! 192-0, by the Chancery Court of Le
NOTICE TO CREDITORS.
March,
flore County, Mississippi, to the
dersigned as executrix of the last will
and testament of Dr. J. W. Dulaney,
deceased, notice is hereby given that
all persons having claims against the
estate of said decedent are required
j to have the same probated and regis
! tered by the Clerk of said court with
1
un
i in one year from this date.
A fail
ure to probate and register any such
claim for one year will bar the claim.
Witness my sigature, this the 8th
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*Da/ti/ Commonwealth 9 s
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Job Printing Department Gives
Prompt and Satisfac
tory Service
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Send i/s 2 /our Orders for /Printing
1
Tl/e *Do Sooct Tl/or/c
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i ll HWtMtHIIMI tl HtM H HU lit iWIIII—ItlMHIIMIIimilHltmiltHMiH
day of March, 1920.
MRS. HATTIE M. DULANEY,
Executirix.
-o
THRIFT WEEK MAR. 22-27.
Postmaster Josie J. Dent, at Mor
gan City, requests The Daily Com
monwealth to announce that March
22-27 will be Thrift Week, and she
urges every teacher and every parent
in that community to take advantage
of the -opportunity to establish the
habit of saving, which means so much
to their children.
-o
Take the Daily Commonwealth
CHANCERY SUMMONS.
The State of Mississ
ippi.
To Jim Silas.
You are commanded to appear be
fore the Chancery Court of the C
ty of Leflore, in said State,
Fourth Monday of March, A. 1)., 1920
to defend the suit in said Court of
Mary Silas, wherein you are a defend
ant.
uu li
on the
This lGth day of February, A. I).
1920.
(Seal)
A .R. BEW, Clerk.
-o
Greenwood needs a general street
cleaning.

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