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The daily commonwealth. (Greenwood, Leflore Co., Miss.) 1916-1919, February 26, 1917, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87065132/1917-02-26/ed-1/seq-2/

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DAILY CO MMONWEALTH.
J. L. GILLESPIE, Editor ud Publisher.
AFTERNOON ASSOCIATED PRESS SERVICE.
. UNION ASSOCIATED PRESS SERVICE.
?
I
!
TELEPHONE NO. 3J.
Office 207 Market Street Common wealth Building,
v « SUBSCRIPTION RATES (By Mail or Carrier)
• IS Cento m Week. 5Ce Cm* . Month. $6.## . Yenv.
Single cop, 5 Cento.
GREENWOOD, MISS, FEBRUARY 26, 1917. |
Leaving civil life for ranks of the militia when
the call to arms came in the last part of the
past century Frederick Funston lived long enough |
and rise high enough in his new profession to
:
An incident of the Spanish war is that his
commanding general once asked him how long he
could maintain his position, which was endan- 1
gered by the approach of a superior force, and re
ceived the terse reply, "Until I am mustered out."
ADVERTISING RATES ON REQUEST.
Entered at Greenwood postoffice as second-class matter.
THE DEATH OF GEN. FUNSTON.
serve his country well,
:
In Vera Cruz it is reported that a Mexican
general once sent him word that the situation was
getting so tense that he could no longer hold his |
men back, and received the assurance from the
American commander, "If you can't hold your
Before the Spanish-American war Funston
had traveled through Alaska, Mexico, South
America and had served under Gomez, the Cuban irr
leader in the war against Spain, commanding the
artillery of the rebels. When war broke out he
took corfimand of a Kansan regiment which was
sent to the Philippines. Here he captured Aguin
aldo and became a national figure. He establish
ed martial law at the time of the San Francisco
earthquake and maintained order in the trying
period following that great disaster.
Yet, as successful as this account of his life
1
men back, I can.
t
seems, it is said that more than once he was ;
on the verge of quitting the service, when other
officers passed him in promotions. He was not a ;
1
West Point man, but a product of the plains, a '
soldier of fortune in Cuba and a servant of his
country in her need. Naturally his death, coming i
when he had just finished the difficult task on the
border, was received by the country with a shock.
ing
FOOD RIOTS IN AMERICA,
* We have been reading of the food riots in Eu
rope, but'few of us have ever considered that this.,
country would soon go through the same exper- ;
fence. We have been reading of increased wealth j P
as the exports to the warring nations toppled C0
higher each week than ever before and somehow,
We were, or at least, we thought we were living in j lo
* nation where the people would not be troubled
with financial difficulties. ^
This may be true of those who own the muni
' . tkm factories but in New York the other day f °
' three thousand women stormed the carts of the la
food peddlers, threw the foodstuff on the ground
and even fired some of the wagons. Women clash- ua
ed time and again with the police and hundreds
Ti them thronged the steps of the city hall in
an effort to protest to the mayor against the food
speculators.
What happened in New York may happen in
other cities and probably will. Every man in the
country who has been living on a fixed wage has
seen his money melt away as he paid'for his
• weekly foodstuff. One wage earner says every | the
time he pays his bill something has gone up, and
observing men know that this is the truth.
Just where the rise in prices will end no one ; ity.
can tell but it is more than apparent that the
condition of the poorer classes is getting harder
and that the pinch of poverty is being felt over
the dbuntry. An investigation into the high cost
of living is planned but what seems to be needed
most of all is a system of distribution which will
prevent the loss of vast amounts of food. Some
means must be found so that the products of. the
farms can be placed in the cities rapidly and in
good condition. It is a task which must be {
solved before the phantom of food riots will end.
for,
ly
ing
few
do,
UNIVERSAL SERVICE.
A year ago only a handful of people could be
found who were in favor of universal military
service. Now the man who opposes such service
is the exception. Americans are essentially a fair
minded people when facts are brought forcibly tb
their attention, and this fact has been amply ex
emplified in the tremendous change of national
to
is
has
ness
sentiment regarding universal service. Daily pa- j his
pers of the great cities assert that the principal ing
objection to universal service comes from the ru- to
' ral districts. But the daily papers are wrong. g e
The young men of our community are on a par
' with those of other rural districts, and yet we un
hesitatingly assert that no where in this broad
land will be found a more unified or patriotic sen
timent than that which exists in the hearts of our
. own young men. If the best interests of the
" country demand that each one, rich and poor alike,
fth#U, serve his six months in a training camp,
. .then when the time comes we will find them stepp- !
• Ing briskly to the front, with heads erect and eyes
upon the flag of freedom. There Mil be no
shirking, or quibbling, or hanging back on the
part of OUR young men.
1
tion
it
to
ever
I
««
will
Pancho Villa should be proud of his criminal
';fiqsg4 It has cost the United States two
tftttioti dollars to "take him," and yet he still \
cavorts around Mexico at wHl and is waiting to be
jmaq
w
r
•****»••
' :
t
Æ
?
CO IN FOH DIVERSIFIED PRODUCT.
There is a real ùi.n ; ..-r to ;iie farmer in turning
substitute for cotton as a
to any one particul
Such t prv. dure would not bcr.e;
I money crop,
the farmer perman. Lily, it could only afford a
! temporary relief. ii„> v. .uid still be a one crop
farmer.
What the farmer should do is to diversify his
^ 8tudy his soii arKi p!ant accordingly, raising
" 8X681 8 var * et >' 01 pr Jct 88 Possible.
Every farmer should have a head or two of
cattle, gaots or other live stock; he should plant
some of his land to peanuts, some to soy beans,
both of which are in •/. at demand by the od
| mills at present, tb .• ; •••*, ut also a'ffords a good |
soil builder. He should .do put in some corn,
some other grain if possible and a little cotton.}
We would not have him neglect cotton altogether
because a few acre; can be cared for without much
labor despite the boll wee'.!
| What the farmer needs
dry, providing for his fa ..
: enough of all crops to ha •
on the market, for the ''uriner, like everybody }
else, needs ready money,
1 Dr. Bradford K
extension work of the fed rai department of agri- (
culture advocates such
some product to sell
a balanced husban
and stock, raising
i
:
let of the cooperative
se as we have out
lined. He says, after reviewing the history of i
farming in the south for
|
farm. From one-tenth to one-fourth acre, well
located, well tiled and ter,led as carefully as any:
other crop on the farm,, planted in rotation to
time the vegetable crops so as to have a contin
uous supply for the family table as many days
irr the year as possible. To this should be added !
one-fourth of an acre in potatoes, either Irish or
sweet or both, to be used as food for the family,
An acre of sorghum cane hould be produced to
supply the family with syrup if means can be
found for grinding the cane and making the ;
syrup
year, with a little excess for safety.
3. Produce sufficient cat3 and other small
1
s past, raise :
A home garden for every family on the j
re
1.
j
„ _ , , , !
2. Produce enough corn on each farm to last
the family and livestock with certainty for
one
i
;
grain to supplement the corn as food for one year
; with certainty, remembering that these small
1
' grains conserve the soil in winter and provide
some grazing for livestock,
i 4. Produce the hay and forage crops neces- !
sary to supply the livestock on the*farm for one
year, with a little excess for safety, not forgett
ing the legume which add fertility to the soil
and produce the best hay.
5. Produce the necessary meat, eggs, and
milk for the family. The meat should be pro
duced by increased attention to poultry and hogs
.
; because of the rapidity with which these can be
j P roduced ' Every family-should have at least two |
C0 ^ s -. 80 that ° ne can , ha ia milk a11 the time - A
sufficient number of brood sows should be kept
j lo P r °^uce the pmfor the family, with some ex-,
6ess for sa] ?' The nun ' ,er oi laYin ® hens should
^ j ncreased and carefully tended to produce eggs
8nd p ° ultl L for tlie tabla wilh a sufficienl excess 1
f ° r sale ' average number of poultry per
la ™ sb ° u d . be gracua y increased to at least;
fiflY ' . The bvestock on the farm should be grad
ua * y increased as a wll0 * e K0 as to consume the
otherwise waste m products on the farm and make
unprofitable feeding of poultry and hogs, beef and
cattle, milch cows, etc. I
livestock, the eggs and the feed crops, to cover
the necessary running expenses of the farm and
save the cotton as the real cash crop,
ity.
6. When the living has been amply provided
for, grow cotton for the main crop.

7. Plan to sell or exchange the surplus pre- j
ducts of the garden, the orchard, the poultry, the
i
Dr. Knapp's slogan is "Food, Feed and Fertil
" It is a mighty good slogan and one entire
ly possible for the farmer to live up to and to
profit from;
11
71
12
20
7G
THE FLOWERS OF SPRING.
The person who does not yearn for a yai-d of
blooming flowers when vitality creeps into grow
ing plants is a strange human being. Yet how
few of us realize the fulfillment of this in the
yards which we have. Everybody could afford
flowers around their homes, but the number who
make the effort are woefully few, and, those who
do, usually make a few mad splurges and then
discontinue their efforts. Greenwood would be
more beautiful if every home owner would try
to beautify the premises and keep something
blooming in the yard every week of the year. It
is said that the gloomy weather of some countries
has had a depressing effect upon the natures of
their people and it is also true that the bright
ness of a man's home may pervade the spirit of
his whole life. A smile within the home, a grow-'
ing blooming plant without, can go a long wayâ
to creating happiness in this old world. Why not
g e t ready to try it?
Tennessee has enacted a "bone dry" prohibi
tion law, which takes effect March 1. After that
it will be unlawful to ship liquor into the state,
to convey it in, or even to have liquor in one's
posëssion. The really disastrous feature çf the
situation is that it will inevitably cause a fearful
decimation in the ranks of the colonels, for who
ever heard of a colonel voluntarily residing in a
bone dry" state?
I I«
««
If it's yellow blood it's constitutional and in
curable; if it's only the "rattles," public derision
will help some.
\ With meatless days and no American tourists,
Switzerland is Convinced war is what Gen. Sher
jmaq saiditwa*.
WITH DISASTROUS RESULTS
a
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Mm,
Æ t F
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«to
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iÿj |j'M
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}
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$}é%
n
u -
V
mfem
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V
lijl],
'JIii- Doctor—J ut surprised to find
you sick. You've always boasted an
iron constitution.
Tlie Putieut—1 ouce had a good con
*UtUtiou, but it's been amended.
i
B««
Even stogies are to go up
that'Is natural with smoke.
At least the man In the suhmarlne
i misses a good deal of monotonous scen
11,1,1 the pneumococcus is no mean on
which the complaint did not allege
!
question there would be less talk in
jest mid
; more <jf ( t
wy.
j
This counir.v luis Ihm*
invaded, too,
emy.
I>i<! a woman pvor sup for divorce in
cruelty?
If thore
Rifles to every
ore tw
j llie world.
It might help some If people didn't
I waste so much food und raised
! Alcohol from potatoes is n posslbll
ity, but why demorali
«nul- virtuous spud?
the expensive
i
hürse ' young and clty brok % Cal1
428 or 497.
FOR SALE.
Horse and buggy. Good driving
!
Farming Land for Kent.
250 acres of new land for rent;
three miles east of Greenwood; ten
ant houses and artesian well; small
or lar ß' e tracts to suit tenants. In
quire of A ' w - Ross or Tel - No - 165 -
Yazo ° & Mississippi Valley Railway.
RAILWAY SCHEDULES.'
|
1
"2 Gremäa^ & P . m.
Twiier., chastn., and G'
^ Gl . a n ^^ l ^ v f; c.; afl . vs ö « u : i 3 a ä.
323 Grenada & 1 . c. arrvs. 2:4ü p. m
313 Mem. Helena, V'burg, G'
„ Ä^Äi1n^ 7p '"
I pt®. ®rr.
(Northern Division.)
Destination.
411 Tutwiler. C uale,
phis, lvs .
No.
Time.
Mem
.. 3:40 a. m.
324 Grenada and I. C., lvs. 8:22 a. m.
314 Tutwiler, C'dale, V'burg,
G'vilie, Helena & Mem
phis, lvs. ...
....10:55a. m.
42 Travelers Spec., Mem.,
Tutwilerand points S.
C'dale, lvs.
.... 2:50 p. m.
10:10 p. m
(Southern Division.)
Durant, Yazoo
City, Jackson and New
Orleans, lvs. ..
331 Tchula,
... 8:22 a. m.
...• 5:00 p. m.
314 Same train, arrives....10:35 a. m
332 Same train, arrives.... 8:30 p. m
For further information apply to
J. W. DONNELL, Tck. Agt.
313 Same
Southern Ky. Co., in Miss.
(Greenwood Station.)
WEST BOUND TRAINS.
Destination.
3 Winona to Greenville,, acc.
leaves .7:25 a. m.
9 Columbus to G'vilie, acc.
loaves . 12:Ü6 p. m
11 B'ham to G ville, thru. tr.
leaves .5:05 p. m
71 G.wood to Webb, dly ex.
Sunday, leaves.2:25 p, m
EAST BOUND TRAINS.
12 C t,o B'ham, thru tr.
leaves
20 G ...it „
1 leaves
4 G'ville
leaves
7G Webb beh., dly. ex. Sun.
....10:36 a. m.
Connection for Belzoni branch lvs
Greenwood 7:25 a. m., also lvs. Grren
wood 5:05 p. m., connecting at Itta
Bena 5:45 p. m.
Sunday service—Wehb-Belzoni beb
alternate, Ivng. Greenwoed 4:45 p. m.
O V GAGE. Tck. Agt.
No.
Time.
9:20 a. m
j Luiuuifius, acc.
. 1:13 p. m.
to Winona, acc.
. 7:08 a. m.
.
arrives .
ed
Lunch At The
ALISE CAFE
en
in
Sppirsh Mackerel j
Speckled Trout !
Fresh Oysters
Kansas- City Meat !
You 1 !! Enjoy
The Well
Prepared Food
And Prompt
Service.
I« ..
fit
It*
I
• ■ ,
Appropriate Table Silve
About that birthday dinner or family reunion
other special occasions soon to occur. Wfiat is the sta
of your table silver?
Nothing—after a perfect menu—adds more
enjoyment of these»occasions than a
<
to tl
TASTEFUL SILVER SERVICE
Our line of Silverware will satisfy the most discriminating taste.
But if we have not just what you want, we will take pleasure i'
in ordering I
it for your.
Our Stock of Jewelry, Cut Glass, Chinaware, Glassware,
Watches, Diamonds, Etc., is the most complete to be found in the Soutjï
Umbreiy
A. WEILER & CO.
ISO®*»9'3(
B«« J. F. HEARD
Phone 970
Z. O. KEENUM
Phone 719
HEARD & KEENUM"
on
in
CONTRACTORS AND BUILDERS
Residences, Repair Work and Screen
ing. We can figure your Work
right.
We do our own Work.
PHONES 719—970.
GREENWOOD. MISS.
too,
in
B. M. JACKSON
Greenwood; Miss.
INTERIOR DECORATING
Painting & Paper Hanging
Canvas Decoration a Specialty
Estimates Furnished Free
Phniu» SOi
(07 Williamson St.
GENERAL GIN WORK
SOLICITED
Sharpening Saws a Spe
cialty.
Fifteen years with Continental and
Mounger Gin Co.
Five years as manager of Gins for
the Buckeye Cotton Oil Co. All work
guaranteed, phone your orders to
phone 731, Greenwood Pickery Co., or
write post office box 343.
W. E. COOKE,
Greenwood. Misa
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À
"àf'y
T. B. MINYARD
Artesian Well Contractor
Greenwood, Miss.
If interested in an artesian well
write or see me and get my prices
on same.
No contract too small or too large
to handle, especially in the Greenwood
territory.
CHANCERY SUMMONS.
The State of Mississippi.
To the unknown parties in interest,
named as defendants, in the suit
hereinafter mentioned:
You are commanded to appear be
fore the Chancery Court of the Coun
ty of Leflore, in said State, on the
Fourth Monday of March, A. D. 1917,
to defend the suit in said Court of
Wilson Banking Company, a corpor
ation, wherein you are defendants,
said suit being numbered 3049 in said
court.
. This the 17th day of February, A.
D., 1917.
(SEAL)
A. R. BEW, Clerk.
HILL & WITTY, Sols, for Pl'ffs.
FOR SALE.
One Latest Model 1917 five-passen
ger Dodge Touring Car. Has only
been driven approximately five hun
dred miles, equipped with chains,
Kelley Springfield Tires; Tires on car
also Kelly-Springficld. Car in perfect
condition, and will be sold at a reduc
ed price. BIG BARGAIN FOR SOME
ONE.
KIMBROUGH AUTO COMPANY,
WANTED.
2 or 3 small sets of Books to keep
where my entire time will not be tak
en up. I have a diploma from one of
the best commercial colleges in the
South, and know I can do the work
in a thorough manner.
T. M. BILLINGSLEY.
Not for Mother.
"No, mother, this novel ii not at .all
fit for you to road." "You are readtn*
It* "Yea,
brought u(
Transcript.
but you know you were
p very differently."—Boston
-o
FOR SALE.
All or any part of 5 can of GOOD,
NATIVE GROWN, EAR CORN. For
prices write or phone,
I Planton Oil Mill ft Mfg. Co.
" " 'Off»*«* Mlasa'iiv
>*♦***•
j *
ri
•yi
j %

ê

j I,.. a^Jlijjl
S? 'SHOWERS FOR THE
" |[ COMING YEAR.»
If that's not a weather predie
lk tion, but a general order that
[ baa been sent to the
from people who heretofore
have missed the pleasure uj
convenience, to say nothing of
£ the cleanliness of an updo.
J date abdwer bath. Moat nod.
1 ern homes, no matter ho*
6 humble, are having them in
to stalled. Why not yon?
' if:
I. *'
*» •:! lîKW'rW y®
fgfeèvli

*
*
L
771
V
i
v
vWS
J. D. LANHAM
*
Plumbing, Heating and Electrical Work
PHONE 55 '
GREENWOOD, MISS.
S
V+-M-++++++.
;
---- ---T T TTTts sss ssss Mti
i c.
E. WRIGHT ICE & GOAL CO
I
i
Greenwood,
'PHONE 45
If
Dealers in
«
a
All Grades of Coal
m
a
%
«
■MANUFACTURERS Of—
»
e
ICE
?
Ice Cream and Carbonated Drinks;
Lso Bottlers of Coca-Cola.
©
•a
3
; n
•0
»
m
MoaoQ 5i*sea«*«eM9
T. F. STEELE, Urea.
SHELBY S. STEELE. Vice-Pres. ft Mft.l
The Delta Insurance & Really Agency
218 W. Market St
Fire, Tornado, Accident, Health, Life, Plate Glass, Empty
ers Liability, Steam Boiler, Burglary and L
Automobile Insurance.
SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO WRITING OF
COTTON COVERS.
tU- represent twenty-four of the Leadng Fire Companies d I
the world, Would be glad to quote you rates on any Sldll
classes of Insurance.
Phone 167
30 MS
this, c .
Bal
M
tj
vm
<
fii
r
■s
:;ÄS§3
.1
ja
Yojjr Choice of Ninety-Foir (94) Styles S 3
" ■ -
4 ™®!» p ° - "
Süflïl HÖ fofiWCV il ut today for Uli» new C«tiito«n* of "®".
full pi,*-, ' s 01 ", Tilc J " ,ld Sundflwatnrfow«o towtliev wlUadoi * »jVft JS '
of hï S !; 's,?- 1 'ull? to Arthur to »«a MWtrmpm&V%ySwSh
Thu ...... f s , n . *'Ai'G kk Bicycles you may select, for ONB MOffTITo
Built- Üp-Whooli
S9I1W4NRED Ȁ
.ire
u:>. Tiler
PACTUll
Oar
ÄÄKS
ttfifll %
J. L. MEAD CYCfcB OO. ^ CHICAQOi
take the daily
V ;

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