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The daily commonwealth. (Greenwood, Leflore Co., Miss.) 1916-1919, March 05, 1917, Image 1

Image and text provided by Mississippi Department of Archives and History

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87065132/1917-03-05/ed-1/seq-1/

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THE DAILY COMMONWEALTH
i&aU
•f'&m
mm
• ?
iM
GILLESPIE, Editor and Publisher
PUBLISHED EVERY AFTERNOON EXCEPT SUNDAY
ASSOCIATED PRESS NEWS SRKVTr
UNION ASSOCIATED P RE88 8BVia, V
SUBSCRIPTION: tSBlËfœm&ÈÂ
J. I*
GREENWOOD, LEFLORE COUNTY. MISSISSIPPI, MONDAY AFTERNOON. MARCH 5, 1917.
yOLUME 1 — NUMBER 158. _
PLOT TO ASSASSINATE PRESIDENT UNCOVERED—6ERMAN ARRESTED
. W
INAUGURAL parade great
PATRIOTIC DEMONSTRATION
j- .
Pennsylvania Avenue Massed With Thousands of
People While Other Thousands Compose
Marching Army of Splendor.
(By Associated Press)
Wsshington, March 6 —The inaug
0,1 parade today was more than a
mere procession as part of the cere
monies; it was a patriotic demonstra
Pennsylvania avenue was massed
with people on each side of the march
Ing column. Great reviewing stands |
had been placed at every vantage j
point along the line. Windows fram- !
ed groups of spectators, and thous
ands more had places in balconies and
the housetops. Between these
walls of humanity, marched the army
of inauguration, to the confused mix
ture of many noises bugles blowing,
bands playing, the rumble of artillery,
the clatter of horses' hoofs and the
steady tramp of marchers.
The procession moved at the close
of the inaugural ceremonies at the
Capital, swinging into line behind
President Wilson and Vice-President
Marshall as they returned to the
White House, and took their places
to review the column.
The chief officers and divisions of
the parade were as follows:
Grand Marshall — Major General I
'
As the marching host of some
30 000 tramped from the Capital to
White House before thousands of
the martial music and un
the
Americans
mistabable note of national patriotism
the days of niore
when the federal
recalled to many
I than 50 years ago
armies marched in review over the
Bane route.
The nation's fighting men, men who
have fought the nation's wars and
men who will be called to fight them
in the future—all were represented in
the long line. Resplendent in gold and
blue and grey, they marched in re
view Ijefore
navy, national guard; cavalry, infan
try, sailors, soldiers, marines; veter
' of the Civil War, Boy Scouts and
Red Cross workers; all branche 8 , past,
present and prospective, of military
service and many thousands of citi
were represented in the line.
the President. Army,
SM
zens
on
Hugh L. Scott.
Frist Grand Divison—Soldiers, sail
on and marines of the regular ser
vice under command of Major-Gener
al Tasker H. Bliss.
Second Grand Divison—National
Guardsmen and cadet schools under
1 command of Brigadier General Will
iam A. Mann.
Third Grand Divison—Veterans of
the Grand Army of the Republic, Un
ited Spanish War Veterans, Army and
Navy Union and patriotic societies
under Department Commander A. J.
Huntoon.
Foruth Grand Division—Civic and
of
political organizations under com
wand of George R. Linking.
President Wilson was escorted by
troops of the Second Cavalry from
Fort Myer. Immediately after the
President and his escort came Vice
President Marshall escorted by the
Black Horse Troop of Culver Military
Academy. Then came the inaugural
chairman, Robert N. Harper and
members of the Senate and House
inaugural committees. The West
Point cadets had the next place in
Due, Long, straight lines of grey,
they marched. These future officers
of the American army, eyes front,
heads high, plumes aflutter, flags
tippling. Then followed the ^.nnapo
lis midshipmen.
Detachments from the regular
»rmy—few, because the regulars
»re on the Mexican border—sailors
from battleships, marines and coast
artillery and a trigade of 600 appren
tice seamen for the Newport, R. I.,
tmining station completed the first
division.
Then marched the Second Division,
guardsmen fresh from the border,
cadet schools under arms, and militia
P"! 1 »- They came from many states,
*° me in their full dress uniform, oth
81 in the olive drab of field service,
showing the hardening months of
? rvice ' Notable in the line were the
First Brigade of the Maryland Guard;
the District of Columbia guardsmen,
newly returned from the border, ca<L
st» from the Virginia Inetitute, Vir
Jjni» Polytechnic Institute, Culver
Military Academy, Donaldson MIH
to* School of Fayetteville, N. C.,
Washington, High School, the cadet
»rpb of the Maryland Agricultural
College, and cadet organisations
troops from Ohio, South Carolina,
Uuisiana, Georgia, and othar states.
j, 0M t *" n nan, it was «stimat
•"< wars ta the first two divisions.
Firs companies gf ssdst# team tha
a
bank
here,
day,
was
on
the
era
or
M
Carlisle Indian school, accompanied by
an Indian band of 40 pieces and 35
Indian girls of the school, marched
next.
inaug
a
cere
Two independent military organiza
tions having places in the line were
the Washington Infantry of Pitta
burgh, one of the oldest organizations
in the country 100 strong; and the
Motor Armor Defense Association of
Baltimore. The latter brought with
them five motor cycles, two side car
machines armed with machine guns,
two-side-car caissons and one truck,
all manned by about twenty men.
In the third division were veterans
of the Civil War and the war with
Spain, and patriotic societies. Head
ing this division were the Grand
Army men, a corporal's guard by com
parison with the thousands of their
fellows who have marched over the
way in years gone by. They echored
their service in the words on the ban
ner behind which they marched, 'Ready
Again for Any Duty."
The fourth division, composed of
civic and political organizations, was
probably the most numerous and di
verse of all. Among the Indian
marchers was a delegation from the
| reservation at St. Francis, S. D.,
j headed by Henry Hollow Horn Bear,
! son of the chief whose likeness adorns
the most recent issue of five-dollar
and treasury notes. Eight hundred worn
these en employes of the Bureau of Engrev
ing and Printing, in distinctive garb;
mix- women afoot, on horseback, in auto
mobiles; women bands, women on
floats; Democratic women workers;
the western, southern and eastern women,
marching, as one leader said, "not as
wax dolls, but as political warriors"
the all were in the long line. i
A feature of this division was the
mounted squadron of Virginia women
the who escorted Mrs. James H. Boggs,
of the Wilson Women's union, a mem
ber of the inaugural committee.
of Tammany Hall sent 2,000 "braves"
ftnd a delegation of "real Indians" the
I former in distinctive dress, the latter
' in ful > tribal ™* aHa - The Esaex
County Democratic Club came in "full
dress," 400 strong, from New Jersey,
the President's home state. Other
,_consiuerea
notable organizations in line were the
Moses Green Club of Louisville and
h nfTl^ . h . C ! b f .. C ^ to -T .... 1 _
Of the many governors who rode
in the procession, some were with the
military organizations of the states
and others, with their staffs, were in
the fourth division. In this division
also were the Mayors of numerous
towns and cities, dozens of political
clubs from smaller cities near and far.
some
to
of
un
niore
federal
the
who
and
them
in
and
re
infan
veter
and
past,
citi
Army,
ser
of
J.
From the Court of Honor, at the
White House, the President reviewed
the line. The musical censor had
seen to it that the bands played var
ied airs as they marched past, elimin
ating their tendency at other inaugur
ations when passing the reviewing
stand to confine their selections to one
of three airs, "Hail to the Chief,"
"Dixie,
by
and "Marching . Through
Georgia." Past the President, the
marchers continued a few blocks and
at
of
was
by
ated
there disbanded.
TEN INCHES OF SNOW.
Pittsburgh Covered With Heavy Man
tle of White Today Result of
Storm.
(By Associated Press)
Pittsburgh, March 6 —As a result of
a severe storm ten inches of snow
covered the ground here today.
BANK 13 ROBBED.
Masked Bandits Force Cashier lato
Vault and Gat Away With Money.
(By Associated Press)
Muskogee, Okie., March 6 —Two
masked men entered the First State
bank at Perkhill, thirty miles east of
here, soon after the bank opened to
day, forced Cashier Pugh into the
vault at the point of pistols and es
caped with | 1,000 in currency.
ATTACK ON VERDUN FRONT.
Germans Make Violent Aasaalt on
French—Finally Repulsed.
(By Associated Trass)
Paris March B—A violant attack
was made yesterday by tha Gsnnhna
on the Verdun front The war office
today says the attacks failed under
the French fire although the attach
era gained a foot hold in advanced po
sitions in Camriaa Wood. Canaan
May
Aof.
M -
' y.
TO AID OTHERS
DIE IN ATTEMPT
Eleven Men Reported Drowned from
Coast Guard Stations on Mary
land Coast—Tanker Stranded.
of
(By Associated Press)
Philadelphia, March 6 —A dispatch
to the Maritime Exchange from Lew
by i*> Del., says that Coast Guard Sta
35 tions on the Maryland coast today
port eleven men drowned in an at .
tempt to render assistance to the
re
were American tanker Louisiana ,stranded
Pitta- off Ocean City, Maryland. At least
nine of the men were drowned from
the the Coast Guard Cutten Yamacraw.
of
with
car
guns,
truck,
with , _
0n,y Colors Uh * d ta D * corat,ona •*
Washington Today—City Allut
com- ! ter With Flags.
their ■
the . (By Associated Press)
Washington, March 6 —The Bed,
ban- white and blue displaced all other I
colors in the scheme of decorations
for President Wilson's inaugural The
of green and white, and the mixture of
was gay colors of other years were en
di- tirely submerged in the display of
national colors,
the From every stand they fluttered,
D., from every public building. The folds
0 f th e flag rippled from the crowded
stands along the line of march as if
j, answer to the salute of the same
co lors home by the marchers. The
fl ag gwung or dropped from, balcony
window, and housetop. It fluttered
j n the hands of cheering spectators,
on |t hung suspended in stately dignity
thousands of homes. On the line
0 f march and off the line of march,
as everywhere, the city displayed the
flag, I
i Th e (j ourt 0 f Honor at the White
the House where the President reviewed
the marching army of celebration ' was
gmo thered in the tri-color. It
the decoration, the only one, in Pres
ident Wilson's second inaugural.
j n choosing the flag as the only dec
oration, the committee is understood
to have had in mind the international
situation as well as President's wish
for dign j t y and simplicitjr in anjr
co i or scheme which might have been
considered
.45
As in previous years the Court of at
Honor extended two blocka on Penn
«onor exwnaeo two piocxa on renn- at
_ 8yIV " niB AVenUe ' fr0m Kft6Wth ßi 37
to Seventeenth, directly in front of
the White House and between the
Treasury and the State, War and
in
:
RED, WHITE AND
BLUE FEATURE
was
Oct.
Mch
May
July
Navy Buildings,
stand, seating about 2,600 was on the
south side of the avenue, while oppo
site, the length of LaFayette Square
was a reviewing stand for others.
The Court itself was a colonnade
The Preeident's
Oct
' !
outside the ourb on each side of the
avenue for the length of the two
blocks. At intervals of sixty feet
the columns were relieved by pylons,
decorated with evergreens and sur
mounted with American flags, the
whole composition being tied together
with festoons of evergreens. At each
end 0 f the court the pylons were elab
ora ted and topped by tripods,
Arches of imposing proportions
gave passageway for vehicles and
formed a termination for reviewing
stands. The center of e»ch stand was
marked by a pediment
President Wilson's stand, marked
by the seal of the United States in
color followed the lines of the portico
at the front of the White House with |
it* fluted columns, and was much
mors elaborate than any other.
Each great white column of the col
onnade was surmounted by an entab
lature, above which projected «/ staff
with the flag flying. In the center of
the columns wars small cedar tress
and connecting the columns and py
lons were double festoons of ever
greens. and single loops of electric
lights.
As in the last inauguration the
Court of Honor was designed to pre
serve the severe lines of the portico
of Monticello, home of Thomas Jef
ferson. Within the President's stand
was built the glees enclosure for the
President, officials and guests. At
peinte along Pennsylvania Ave. the
decorative features were heightened
by 'courts of state.' consisting of some
what smaller columns and pylons con
nected with festoons of . evergreens.
Tonight these courts will be illumin
ated by festoon of electric lights.
quit«
tion.
dsy
-O
NEW YORK COTTON OIL MARKET
Prev. Ctoae.
Ckwe.
1S.CS
May
18.54
19-04
Aof.
l*i 54
DOUBT POWER
OF PRESIDENT
from
Question as to Arming Ships Without
Consent of Congress To Be Set
tled by Tomorrow.
(By Associated Press)
Washington,: Harch 5—President
Wilson has rdfi
visors his doub
Lew
||red to his legal ad- i
ts as to his power to j
arm American ships in the absence !
of direct authority from Congress, j
Some decision is expected from the !
Attorney General within the next 24
hours.
Sta
at .
the
re
least
•*
New y or){
disappointment ht the failure of Con
gress to pass the" Armed Neutrality
bill was indicated by the heavy tone
in today's early dealings on the mar
I ket. Shipping showed a decline of
from two to foujr points.
of
of
if
nounced the obstructionists and ex
pressed doubt whether he could pro
ceed to arm ships without legislative
.sanction,
I
this afternoon at a net rain of 17 to
this afternoonata net gam of 17 to
.45 points and New Orleans market
at a ea i n 0 f 18 to 20 noints Soots
l m v l on P ! j
at New York were 30 points up and
37 points advanced at New Orleans.
Sales 4 902 bales
DISCUSS CLOTURE RULE.
(By Associated Press)
Washington, March 5—A Demo
cratic Senate Caucus has been called
for ten thirty tomorrow. One of the
subjects to be discussed is the fight
for cloture rules'to prevent a filibus
ter by Senators such as killed the
: Armed Neutrality bill.
—1 -
WALL STREET DISAPPOINTED.
(By Associated Press)
h 5—Wall Street's
he
DENOUNCES SENATORS.
(By Associated Press)
Washington, March 5—President
Wilson believes that the killing of the j or
Armed Neutrality bill by the Senate
filibuster may effectually prevent him *
from arming merchant ships. He ad
vocates an immediate reform of the
rules by the Senate at the session
called today to prevent a small ma - 1
jority from holding up legislation, a
The President in a statement de
It
of
ing
few
"d>"
COTTON GRAIN
AND PROVISIONS
New York Closed 17 to 45 Up and
New Orleans 18 to 20 Points
Advanced Today.
ant
the
He
lect
may
bold
and
brace
what
The New York cotton market closed
of
close
ed
Greek
the
Prev.
Open High Low Close Close
Oct. 16.29 16.45 16.12 16.26 16.14 is
Mch 17.37 17.60 17.37 17.61 17.33 not
May 17.19 17.64 17.12 17.32 17.12 words
July 17.20 17.48 17.03 17.23 17.03
Closed 18 to 20 up.
New York Spots 18.06—30 up.
New Orleans Spots 17.60-37 up.
Sales 4902.
NEW YORK MARKET.
Prev.
Open High Low Close Close
Oct 16 60 16.82 16.50 16.66 16.50
! Mcb 17.75 18.03 17.62 18.00 Ï17.55
May 17.60 17.98 17.50 17.76 17.50
July 17.54 17.86 17.41 17.63 16.46
Closed 17 tQ 45]pp.
NEW ORLEANS MARKET.
Rule
ton
vain.
"I
vancing
divine
Babel
and
highest
lineage
as a
when
malice
more
duct
LIVERPOOL MARKET.
Prev. Close
11.03
Close.
Mch.-Apr.
May-June 11.23
July-Aug. 11.06
Spots 11.74
Sales 7000.
11.83
* 10.93
10.78
"I
we
to live
it may
through
assault
that
partisan,
only
Mississippi—Fair tonight Tcm- ' men
perature below freesing, although not to be
quit« so cold in north and west por- wilderness
tion. Heavy frost near coast Tuea- which
dsy £#1» and warms*. jArk
CHICAGO GRAIN MARKET.
Close Prev. Close
Wheat.
1 88 3-8
11 88 7-8
May
conduct
liable
know
an
unit
self
the
the
Corn
1.06 1-2
1,07 3-8
May
Oats.
.59 3 4
.59 3-8
May
CHICAGO PROVISIONS.
Close Prev. Close
Pork
. 83.80
33.15
May
Lard
16.36
May
19 00
Ribs.
17.82
Jan
17.66
THE WEATHER
Forecast.
RIVERS FLOOD
IN SOUTHEAST
Without
Five SUtes Threatened With Disas
trous Overflows—Ample Warn
ings Sent to tnhabitente.
(By Associated Press)
Atlante, March 5—The South today
ad- i faces floods which threaten to be al
to j most as disastrous as those of last
! summer when hundreds were made
j homeless and millions of dollars worth
the ! of property was destroyed.
24
Fifteen rivers in five states, Ten
nessee, Alabama, Georgia, North Car
olina and Virginia are overflowing
their banks as a result of many days
of heavy rains. With ample
ings given it is not believed there
will be so heavy a tell of life.
Con
tone
mar
of
ex
j
Demo
called
the
fight
the
wam
be
to
ca
it
one
up
MARSHALL TAKES
OATH OF OFFICE
His Creed of Citizenship Outlined in
His Speech Before the Members
of the Senate.
(By Associated Press)
Washington, March 6 —Vice Presi
dent Marshall made his second inaug
ural address before the Senate today
—a statement of his creed of citizen
ship under a government for which,
he said, "I ought to be willing to live
the j or to die ' 88 God decrees, that it may
not P er ' s h off the earth through
him * reac hery within or through assault
ad- from without."
the
o'clock. Hiss address follows:
- 1 "
a few words upon this occasion: oth
de
He took the oath of office at 12:02
Custom calls for the utterance of
erwise, I would gladly remain silent.
It may not be inappropriate to
press my gratitude for the little
nameless, unnumbered and oft-times
unremembered acts of courtesy and
cha/ity shown to me by the members
of this body during the last four
years; to express my regret over the
vanishing faces of those who are leav
ing and to welcome those who in a
few moments are to become
workers in the cause of constitutional
freedom.
«X
our co
'Everywhere in America are clam
ant and strident voices proclaiming'
the essential elements of patriotism.
He who seeks out of them all to
lect one clear note of love for country
may fail I conceive it to be
important to examine myself than to
cross-examine another. May I make
bold to insert in the Record seme ele
ments of the creed which I have
adopted in this period of retrospection
and introspection? It does not em
brace what I know but holds part of
what I believe.
se
,
at
house
I
1 ments
"I have faith that this Government lined
of ours was divinely ordained to dis- House
close whether men are to nature fitt- time
ed or can by education be made fit for coin
self-government; to teach Jew and to
Greek .bondman and free, alike, the
essential equality of all men before
the law and to be tender and true to the
humanity everywhere and under all was
circumstances; to reveal that service police
is the highest reward of life. I can- par
not believe otherwise when I read the
words and recall the sacrifices of the were
Fathers. If ours is not the Golden
more
Rule of Government, then Washing- the
ton wrought, and Lincoln died, in
vain.
A
taches
"I believe that the world now ad
vancing and now retreating, is nev
ertheless moving forward to a far-off
divine event wherein the tongues of
Babel will again be blended in the dica
ianguage °f a common brotherhood; execu
and I believe that I can reach the
highest ideal of my tradition and my
lineage as an American—as a man,
as a citizen and as a public official,— I
when I judge my fellow-men without 1
malice and with charity, when I worry 1
more about my own motives and con
duct and less about the motives and
the
dent,
a
hours;
through
an
A
a five
President
arranges
Mr.
, , »tes-no
"I believe there is no finer form of ed
government than the one under which
we live and that I ought to be willing tration
to live or to die, as God decrees, that cation,
it may not perish from off the earth ular
through treachery within or through | necessary
assault from without; and I believe j never
that though my first right is to be a ; nation's
partisan, that my first duty, when the mer
only principles on which free govern- or
men can rest are being strained, is taris»
to be a patriot and to follow in a hia
wilderness of words that clear call away
which bids me guard and defend th« than
jArk of our National Covcnsnt." ^traveUnfi
conduct of others. The time I am
liable to be wholly wrong is when I
know that I am absolutely right. In
an individualistic Republic, I am the
unit of patriotism and if I keep my
self keyed in unispn with the music of
the Union, my fellow-men will catch
the note and fall into time and step.
WOODROW WILSON BEGINS HIS
SECOND TERM OF FOUR YEARS
Took Public Oath of Office Today at Twelve Forty
Fve—His Inaugural Address a Masterpiece
in Every Respect
« 1
JK, '
(By Associated Press)
BULLETIN. Hoboken, N. J., March 5—An
alleged plot against the life of President Wilson
was uncovered here today, according to detec
tives who arrested Fritz Kolb, a German reservist
from Mexico.
(By Associated Press)
Washington, March 6 —President
Woodrow Wilson publicly took the
oath of office as President of the Un
ited States at 12:45 o'clock today,
with a new consecration to the
tion's service. The oath was taken
before a great crowd which packed
the piazza at the east front of the
Capitol.
Vice Président Marshall took the
QUth in the Senate Chamber.
In his inaugural address the Pres
ident touching on the international
crisis declared there would be
turning back from the tragical events
of the last thirty months which has
brought upon America new responsi
bilities as a citizen of the world.
The President declared that Amer
ica must stand for peace, stability,
free peoples, national equality and
that the right to use the seas must
be free to all. Continuing the Presi
dent said that this nation shall not
support any government not derived
from the concent of the governed,
sounding a soiumn warning to the
nation against any factional intrigues
to break the harmony or embarrass
the spirit of the American people.
The President called for an Ameri
ca "United in feeling, in purpose, in
vision, iftduty, ip opportunity and in
service." ' r '
At the conclusion of his address the
President lead the inaugurai proces
sion back to the White House where
it passed in review before him. Some
one in the crowd began singing
"America" and the strains were taken
up by the mighty throng of thous
ands.
na
in
Presi
inaug
today
live
no
may
oth
12:02
of
little
and
four
the
a
«X
tion
to
and
co
to
of
UNDER LEADED SKIES.
se
, (By Associated Press)
Washington, March 6 —The inaug
uration began under leaded skies
which threatened to bring rain at any
moment. President Wilson was up
at eight o'clock and before nine had
breakfast with his family and the
house guests.
I The Twelfth and Sixty-Ninth Regi
1 ments of New York National Guards
lined the streets from the White
House to the Capitol This Is the first
time since the first inaugural of Lin
coin that state troops have been used
to guard the line of march.
Just before Eleven o'clock the,
President and his party moved off for | ^
the capitol. The President's carriage I
was entirely surrounded by troops,!,.
police and secret service men. The J ÎJ lm
par ty nrrived at the Capitol without he
incident. Meanwhile the gallories S
were filling with distinguished guests.
on
or
The diplomatic corps was seated on
the floor of the chamber,
A BREAKER OF PRECEDENTS.
(By Associated Press)
Washington, March 6 —Oldest at
taches of the White House regard
President Wilson as the most-metho
ad
nev
of
the dica i, gygt ematic, time-saving chief
execu tive within their memories,
the
my
I
1
1
From the very first of his admin
istration, the Mexican difficulties and
the European war have added im- '
measurably to the duties of the Presi
dent, but he has managed to maintain
a strict schedule for his working
hours; he never has been known
through personal fault to be late with
an engagement and has religiously
conserved his time.
A White House caller, booked for
a five minute interview with many a
President often got an hour. If one
arranges a five minute interview with
Mr. Wilson, one gets exactly five mm
, »tes-no «nore-and the way .s clear
of ed for the next caller.
Although during his first admims
tration the President took no real va
cation, he managed to maintain a reg- no
ular program of physical recreation
| necessary to conserve his health. He
j never haa been out of touth with the
a ; nation's business. When at the Sum- ] f
mer White House at Cornish, N. H., | led
or Long Beach, N. J., a staff of score
is taris» was close at hand. All during 1
a hia first term the President was not j
away from the White Houae more 1
than two weaks at a time on trips hut
^traveUnfi about ths country and he ^thc
I
In
of
the
Un
today,
taken
packed
the
the
Pres
events
has
and
must
not
the
in
in
the
never has gone further west +h.n
Topeka, Kansas.
Friends of Mr. Wilson say he dis
likes the idea of going into the coun
try, but enjoys himself when he does
na
go.
Many word pictures of the Preai
dent at work and at play have been
written, but those closest to 1 him say
that his every day life is a natural
one for a man who never has been
wealthy and has grown up in an at
mosphere of regularity and natural
living.
Mr. Wilson does many things per
sonally that could easily be done for
him by others. Frequently he walks
from the executive offices to the White .
House to get a book or letter when he
could more easily press a button and
have someone bring it to him. Hit
liking for directness of action explains
why more than one occasion he
walked to different
partments to see cabinet members In
stead of summoning them to the ,
White House. He has never allowed
precedent to interfere with the coiiifc#'
he thought the most direct. ' '
The time the President's working
day begins depends upon the
of the year. Ordinarily, in winter he
gets up between 7 and 7:30 o'clock,
but summer he usually «rises earlier
—sometimes' at 5 or 6:30.
lievea in daylight saving whenever
possible.
no
government de
season
He be
When he first came to the White
House he attended to most of his offi
cial work in the morning, apd played
golf in the afternoon, but this winter,
he reversed his program, and played
golf in the warm morning hours, and
worked in the afternoon. He goes
golfing either with Mrs. Wilson and
Dr. Grayson soon after breakfast, and
works on his mail from noon to 1
o'clock. In the afternoon he sees cal
lers and signs official papers, except
Tuesdays and Fridays, when the
cabinet meets. Ordinarily an hour
Monday, Wednesday and Thursday af
ternoons is set aside for the
tion of members of Congress.
After dinner, generally About 7
o'clock, the President does no work
unless it is absolutely necessary. He
either reads, plays billiards, or goes
to a theatre. Detective stories, poems,
and autobiographies are his favorite
literature. It is more or less of an
up
, .
| ^ e .". secret . , th " t hls preference is for
I lm f old *' me , detective «tori«
en , e £ a *T ers b ' s ^ amdy »bout
J ÎJ lm ' and reads poems - Frequently
he 8teals away to a * aller F to view
S °™® P ai " t ' n 8 »
The Pre8ldent ' 8
on
on
recep
insistence on
promptness contrasts with the more
or less carefree habits of some of his
predecessors. When the cabinet meets
the President's advisers are frequent
ly early, but are seldom late.
As a breaker of precendents Mr.
Wilson set official Washington agasp
even before he came into office by
nouncing that he did not desire the
usual inaugural ball. He followed
that by declining memberehip in aome
so-called exclusive club which always
had claimed the membership of Pres
an
' idents.
when he began the custom of ^
livering hig addreg8 to C gg jn
person ho revjved , cugtom which had
died wit „ Waghington> and Adamg
No p resident ginee j effer son had ad
dresged the Congregg pergona Hy and '
no other Pregident gince Madiaon ^ .
addregted the 8 enate separately
foreign a ffaira ae President Wilson
did on b j g ,.^^(1 pf n es note His
f on dness for directness^of action has
led to the „hattering of many other
precedents.
Never has the President relaxed "
any 0 f y, e customs which make for É
respect and bonor f or nM , m M
hut ho shattered -p-v precedents in 'J
^thc interest of %r > ' notion.. ' ^
One of his first acts was to greatly
decrease the number of army and
navy officers assigned to the White
House as aides, until less than a half
dozen remained. Mr. Wilson abolish
ed the motor cycle guard which used
to surround the President's car when
he went out on the streets, saying he
wished to go about just as any other
citizen.
"j
'
m
Vj£v

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