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The daily commonwealth. (Greenwood, Leflore Co., Miss.) 1916-1919, May 26, 1917, Image 3

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87065132/1917-05-26/ed-1/seq-3/

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By GOLDMAN
^YaTprOPS—L ife in a Movie Studio
Issy is not responsible for his colleague's eccentricities
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Always Be Sure of the Number
We urge our subscribers to consult
the Telephone Directory whenever a call
is to be made. When you trust to your
memory, your are apt to transpose the fig
telephone number; when you
ures in a
trust to an old card or letterhead, you are
apt to call a number that has been changed.
And when you do call a "wrong
you cause inconvenience and
>>
number,
delay for yourself and for the party whom
you call in error. Make it, a practice, to
consult the Directory first.
CUMBERLAND TELEPHONE
AND TELEGRAPH COMPANY
Incorporated
C. M. JONES, Manager
I
Not for Mother,
"No, mother, this novel ts not at all
' fit for you to read." "You are readlns
It" "Yes, but you know' you were
srougnt up very differently."—Boston
Transcript
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Wö want your orders for
Letter Heads, Note Heads, Bill
Heads, Statement Heads, Envelopes,
!, Shipping Tags, Business Cards, Visit
intg. Cards, Contract Blanks, Legal
Sinks, Notes and Gin Receipts,
Time pickets, Circulars, Hand Bills,
Sign Cards, Etc.
/-I ■
®
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First Class Workmanship
« ; . High Class Material
®
THE
0
DAILY COMMONWEALTH
ID
GREENWOOD, MISS.

*
.f it ■ «'
./.I.' ' ;•
t' ,
Don't Worry About Posterity.
One of the simplest and best ways
of not borrowing trouble Is not to al
low yourself even to think of what's
going to happen U» posterity^-Ohlo
State Journal.
■ _
THE CHAUTAUQUA PROGRAM.
Hours: Morning 9 A. M.| Afternoon
3 P. M.; Evening S P. M.
4th DAY.
Morning.
Children's Hour.
Afternoon.
Popular Reading, Children's Woik
er.
Lecture — "Machinery and Mcf,
Charles L. Ficklin.
Admission 25.
Children 15c
Evening
"Accounts Overdue", "In the War
Zone," "The Man Outside," Parish
Players Co.
Admission 50c.
Children 25c.
5th DAY.
Morning.
Children's Hour.
Afternoon.
A Singing Band, Dunbar's White
Hussars.
Lecture—"The Fortune Hunter," Dr.
William A. Colledge.
Admission 25.
Children 15c
Evening.
Circus Time in Fairyland, A Play
by the Local Children.
Grand Concert, Dunbar's White Hus
aars.
Admission 50c.
Children 25c.
AUTOMOBILE
REPAIR WORK
Will be given prompt and
careful attention, and
orders appreciated.
all
1AMES SHARP
205 River Front
Near Yazoo Bridge
Greenwood, Miss.
«. M. HICKSON
Greenwood, Misa.
INTERIOR DECORATING
Painting & Paper Hanging
Canvas Decoration a Specialty
Estimates Furnished Free
407 Williamson St
Phone 504.
"You can hardly blame people fto
die mere fact" that they are fools, be
cause they are born that way."
"Quite true."
"But I have no patience with the
kind of people who are continually ad
vertisfng their lack of common sense."
"Proceed."
"I was walking through one of those
jneaslv little moth-eaten city purks
about a block square the other day
When a poetical-looking chap paused
near a dusty shrub, clasped his hands
together and exclaimed, 'Oh, ho^ I love
the great outdoors !
WALTER D. FOX. O. D.
A. Waller A Co. wish to announce
A their friends and patrons, that they
have secured the services of Walter
E. Fox, O. D., lately of Kansaa City,
Mo.
Dr. Fox has had years of exper
ience in the testing eyes, and i§ fully
capable of handling any case, where
glasses are needed to give relief to
your eye trouble. If your eyes pain
or the lida burn, your head achea, or
your vision is poor, you can get
prompt relief at a reasonable expense.
Satisfaction Guaranteed.
A. WEILER A CO.
Jewelers and Optometrist
CARRIED AWAY.
A Woman's Theory.
"It was my painful duty to decline
__ offer of marriage from Professor
Brainnrd .last night," said the young
"Indeed," said her lady friend. "Why
dld you refuse him? He Is considered
un
widow.
the most eminent mathematician »T
UI "yX and that is Just why I refused
him." said the y. w. "He would be al
ways trying to mathematically demon
strate tbe errors in my dressmaker'»
hlUa" - ;
RAILWAY SCHEDULES.
Yasoo & Mississippi Vslley Railway.
(Northern Division.;
Destination.
40 Tutwiler, C'dale, Mem
.... 3:40 a. m.
Time.
No.
phis, lvs ...
324 Grenada and I. C., lvs. 8:22 a. m.
314 Tutwiler, C'dale, Vburg,
G'ville, Helena A Mem
phis, lvs..
42 Travelers Spec., Mem.,
Tutwilerand points S.
C'dale, lvs.. 2:60 p. m.
332 Grenada A I. C., lvs. 8:08 p. m.
41 Trav. Spec., Mem., V'brg.
T'wiler., Chastn., and C -
331 Grè'nadâ&T C./arr^s SUS a. m.
323 Grenada A I. C. arrvs. 2:40 p. m.
318 Mem. Helena, V'burg, G'
....10:55a,' m.
viife and Chiton, air. 4:47 p. m.
39 Mem. Hel. Cdale. A inter.
,'Ä 10 P '
381 Tchula, Dunmt, Yawo
City, Jackson and New
Orleans, lvs. .
— 8:22 a. m.
6:00 p. m.
313 Same
For further information apply to
J. W. DONNELL, Tele. Agt
Southern Ry. Co* in Miss.
314 Same train, arrives„..10:35 a. m.
882 Same train, arrives.... 8:30 p. m.
(Greenwood Station.)
WEST BOUND TRAINS.
Destination.
8 Winona to Greenville,, acw
leaves
leave«
9 Columbus to G'ville, see.
11 B'ham t» G'ville, thru. tr.
leaves . w ...o:05 p. b.
71 G.wood to Webb, dly ex.
Sunday* leave«.2:25 p. m.
EAST BOUND TRAINS.
12 G'ville to Blutm, thru tr.
litvsi . . 9:20 a. m.
20 G'ville to Columbus, see.
leaves -P- m -
4 G'ville to Winona, acc.
leaves ... 7:08 a. m.
70 Webb bch., dly. ex. Sun.
arrives __ 10:86 a. m.
Connection for Belsoni branch lvs.
Greenwood 7:20 a. m., also lvs. Grren
wood 6:06 p. m., connecting at Itta
6:45 p* id*
Sunday service—Webb-Belzpni Bch»
alternate, lvng. Greenwood 4:46 p. "
Ö. V GAGE. Tck. Agt
Time.
No
..7:25 a. m.
12:06 p. m.
s— MI M I M I H I MM 99
QUALITY FIRST
Try us ând be
CONVINCED
The best of everything to 1 !
QUICK SERVICE
At The
AUOE CAFE
+
VALEDICTORY ADDRESS
Of MUa Rath Dteldns at Graduating
Exercises of Greenwood High
School, May 22d, 1917.
The night to which we have been
looking forward with so much eager
ness has at last come, and Were I to
hold up a calendar enumerating the
days in the life of each member of
this class, this day would bo a red
letter day for us all. Most of our
lives are so drab, so common place, so
mediocre, but let us hope that many
more red letter days are to come into
our lives—days perhaps unseen and
unnoticed by the world, but days the
recording angel will count, when we
have overcome a temptation, endured
with dogged patience and finished with
thoroughness an unpleasant task.
Tonight when I bid you dear super
intendent, dear teachers, dear fellow
students, dear trustees farewell, I can
not but be sad, I would drop a tear
for sorrow of parting—another for
the things we should have done and
did not, and for the things we did not
do and should have done. Beloved
teachers charge all these things not
to hardness of heart but to the
thoughtlessness and selfishness of the
capricious youth. Fellow students we
hate to tell you good bye, but as the
poet says "parting is such a sweet
We leavè you this farewell
message—study. The ideal of most
pupils with regard to going to school
It is better to have come and
loafed, than never to have come at all."
Scholarship will not give you popular
j ty w m, y 0Ur fellow students, but it
Lill give you something better—their
respect. Then your future career de
* , .
pe " 8 ° n ' ' ,. . „
Contentment with mediocri y,
says Professor Lowell, is perhaps the
greatest danger that faces the stu
dent." Professor Foster of Reed Col
i e g e , Oregon, has compiled some ip
teresting statistics after some years
painstaking investigation. I will
dte these figures from the Harvard
L aw School, extending for a period of
20 years. Of the pupils who graduat
ed with no honor 6 1-2 per cent, at
sorrow.
is:
tained distinction, of those who grad
uated with honor 22 per cent, attained
distinction, 40 per cent, who graduat
e( j w jth high honor attained distinct
;
ion, and of those who graduated with
grea t honor 60 per cent. That is 20
who studied succeeded, where one who
d > d not study succeeded. Enjoy your
new suit now, pay for it later cries
the bill board. Many a boy and girl
expects to get an education on the
same plan.
Class of 1917 life is out before us.
We regret to say good-bye.' We will
soon be scattered who knows where.
Most of us will attend college, some of
you boys will perhaps soon be. carry
ing Old Glory, "somewhere in France,"
and who can tell what events may
into our uneventful lives?
To you I leave this message: Be
come men and women of high ideals.
High ideals of patriotism, truth, just
ice, happiness, and of God. Idealism
dignifies poverty, glorifies work. The
woman of high ideals will be happier
in the woods with the yellow autumn
leaves blowing about her than she
would be to become the possessor of a
$40 hat. The man of ideals feels his
' J u -
come
soul satisfied by the beauty of the
tender green grass, the blooming
jhawthorne and the whistle of the
blackbird rather than by the pleasure
of the most luxurious club for men.
Wiht high ideals we can not be self
; g j, ( ignoble, commonplace, self cen
ter(jd se if. sa ti s fied. Much more do we
need ideals than ambitions. Ambi
tions destroy, they seek self alone. The
of idealism look not to what this
and woman next to me are doing
eyes
man
but to the North Star. So let us bid
farewell to the happy year that has
just passed with this little poem writ
ten by a young Mississippian:
Good bye, Old Year; the road I walked
with you
Was not all flowers, and yet I found
among
The thorns along the path a rose or
two
That made the way seem short, my
heart seem young,
And all the world a paradise to see.
Good bye, Old Year; though I have
loved you well
I would not keep you now; your work
is done.
They say that you are soaked with
blood; they tell
Of pestilence and strife, but I am one
For whom you held a rose. Enough
for me.
■GREENWOOD."
Subject of Speech by Miss Mary
Brown at Graduating Exercises
of Greenwood High School,
May 22d, 1917.
Ladies, Gentlemen, Teachers, Class
mates, Friends, All:
This is a wonderful time! How we
the class of 1917 have longed for it.
With what patience and kindness have
the Teachers led us on to this glad
some day. The City Commissioners,
the School Board and the good citizens
of Greenwood have made this day pos
sible. I am so glad that I am here
and have a part in it.
Our class has chosen Mississippi,
loved state, for its theme. Could
have chosen our gems of thought
from a more precious casket? and a
most precious gem has been given me
for my consideration. Greenwood, the
'Queen City of tye Delta—"My own,
My Home.
our
we
my native land!
I'm not going to discuss Greenwood
of the largest cotton markets
as one
in the South, but we glory in this.
I'm not going to discuss her splendid
public-spirited citizenship that has
made her one of the important com
mercial ««tan of tht »Ute, but w
fcM
W. S. BARRY, Pres.
FIRE IN SÛR
DODGING RESPONSIBILITY
GHS A MANS REPUTATION
ALL OUT OF SHAPF!
it.
[y.Vi
m
7ffî
■ •>
c«c
We keep our business reputation in good sbepo by living op* to our
satisfaction-guarantee motto. If you insure with os we're going to
make sure that you're pleased before the transaction is dosed.
GREENWOOD AGENCY GO., INC.
GREENWOOD. MISS
PHONE 141.
««»»»»♦ — »♦♦♦♦♦♦a — ♦ae — o» — o
THE BATH IS BEST
9k for young and old when the
CSË best plumbing makes for sani
Jsk tary precautions Elegance,
f/j.'i- convenience and comfort are
{fir. '1 «»joyed whan our open work
gpçftg plumbing is installed. We gnsr
an tee that our workmanship is
of the highest order. Our
■Sg-J prices are really reasonable.

Æ
>
M
J. D. LANHAM
Plumbing, Heating and Electrical Work
GREENWOOD, MISS.
PHONE 55
$20.45
Greenwood, Miss.
to
WASHINGTON D.. C. AND RETURN
via
Southern Railway in Mississippi
account
UNITED CONFEDERATE VETERANS
REUNION
I
DATES OF SALE: JUNE 1st to 6th, INCLUSIVE.»
Final Limit: June 21st, with privilege of extension until July 6th.by
depositing ticket and paying fee of 50 cents.
STOPOVERS ALLOWED
J. L. COX, A. G. F. & P. A.,
Columbus, Miss.
C. RUDOLPH, G. P. A.,
St. Louis, Mo.
RING
308
RING
That is, we move the EXACT
ING PUBLIC of THIS SECTION
of the world—the class that insists
on careful workman, modem mo
tor equipment, and exact supervis
Y
Wi
m\
ion.
When YOU want to move to
ANY SECTION of the world you
will find our TRANSFER SER
VICE and Packing and CRATING
SERVICE a REAL AID to you.
It doesn't cost anything to ob
tain our rates—they're surprising
y moderate.
JlilL
1
Chambless Transfer Co.
IMSSltfTTT-^.....e«>...s .a« ssa »s ss »»»S M—S
IMm i lH III M I Ht l MM 9I HI99M9 i m
JOHN ASHCRAFT
WARNER WELLS
ASHCRAFT & WELLS
ANY FEATURE OF INSURANCE
1st Floor Wilson Bank Building.
; PHONE 460.
> 000000 — ———— —
LEFLORE GROCER GO.
WHOLESALE
GREENWOOD. MISS.
!
Nor am I going !
to discuss her magnificent churches, '
school, library and community build- j
ing, which prove her aim and vision .
of a broader future. In this we glory,
glory in this.
too. I'm not going to discuss the won
derful alluvial soil of her farm lands .
that makes her prosperity, nor her ]
railroads and rivers that bear her '
prosperity out into the world. I'm just
going to give a High School girl's vis
ion of her dear home town.
I was not born here, but I cut my
teeth here, so my theme on Green
wood will cover only a short time, but
oh! such a wonderful time. The first
day at school, the first parties, the
picnics, the fish frys, Xmas trees, and
all of the things that make child
hood's happy dream.
Then H. S. days with their splendid
associations and friendships that bless
e'en down to old age.
Greenwood has had no small vision
when ehe has .considered the educa
te« of her youth, Much time, thought,
talent and money has been given that
the Greenwood High School might
gen(1 her ^yg an j gj r l 8 „ut well fitted
. ^ ^ ^ ^ in the world .
, .
Just here—with all of the ardor
. of my nature,.1 wish I could say what
] Prof Saundert has been to the boys
' and gifts of the Greenwood High
School. He has kept the- Visthn ever
before us, of success through honest
endeavor. He has planned for our
work and pleasure with wise fore
thought. He has been our sympath
izing friend. We are proud of the
classes that have preceded us. W«
have sent some splendid boys And girls ,
to help make the world's work. We
love the class of 1917, may they taka
their placés Just as splendidly.
Greenwood, the Queen City of the
Delta, from a High School Girl's view
point, Is just the finest place of alt
She enters into your joy and Sorrow.
She is great toddy—will be greater
tomorrow. ^
WM

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