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The daily commonwealth. (Greenwood, Leflore Co., Miss.) 1916-1919, May 30, 1917, Image 3

Image and text provided by Mississippi Department of Archives and History

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87065132/1917-05-30/ed-1/seq-3/

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SHELBY S. STEELE, Vice-Pres. & Mgr.
T f. STEELE, Pres.
The Delta Insurance & Realty Agency
218 W. Market St
Tornado, Accident, Health, Life, Plate Glass, Employ
Liability, Steam Boiler, Burglary and
Automobile Insurance.
SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN TO WRITING OF
COTTON COVERS.
We represeht twenty-four of the Leadng Fire Companies of
the world. Would be glad to quote you rates on any and all
classes of Insurance.
Fire,
era
Phone 167
B. M.
Greenwood, Miss.
INTER'OP DECORATING
Painting & Paper Hanging
Canvas Decoration a Specialty
Estimates Furnished Free
407 Williamson St.
j
rn.
Phone 504.
--—
If it happens you will see it in The
Daily Commonwealth.
® ® ® (§)(§) ®>®@®@®®«
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<§)
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Printing!
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We want your orders for
Letter Heads, Note Heads, Bill
Heads, Statement Heads, Envelopes,
Shipping Tags, Business Cards, Visit
ing Cards, Contract Blanks, Legal
Blanks, Notes and Gin Receipts,
Time Tickets, Circulars, Hand Bills,
Sign Cards, Etc.
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First Class Workmanship .
High Class Material
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THE
®
DAILY COMMONWEALTH
®
GREENWOOD, MISS.
\
I
Of the Earth Family.
Bix weeks they'd been married whe® j
Of gold there was a dearth;
Eclipsed then was their honeymoon
By the shadow of the earth.
A Poor Substitute.
"Do you suppose moving plcturst
will ever do away entirely with per* ;
formances on the stage?" I
j "No, Indeed," replied the astute tho
atrlcal manager, "in the opinion of
the tlred business man, to whom I
cater exclusively, no shadow oa the
screen, however lifelike, can toko ths
plaça at • rasl live " homo girt."
fp————————
QUALITY FIRST
Try us and be
CONVINCED
The best of everything to
EAT
QUICK SERVICE
j
At The
AUGE CAFE
;
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i
I
Why not let The Daily Common
wealth visit your home every after
noon?
" 40 000 BOYS IM MEMORIAL DAY
PARADE.
New York, May 29—(By Union As
sociated Pres»)—The largest Memorial
! Day observance to be held tomorrow
I will take place in this city. Fifth av
will have the novel experience of
serving from Washington arch to the
Park plaza as a stadium for many
sports. Forty thousand school boys
will take part in the preparedness par
ade of -the Public Schools Athletic
League. In additjpn there will be
hibitions by young marksmen of shoot
ing with the subtarget gun—the de
vice through whose use, without the
danger attendant upon the use of fire
arms, hundreds of crack riflemen have
i been developed among the schoolboys,
j Among the guests of honor in the par
; ade will be dher one hundred cadets
I from Camp John Paul Jones at Cor
Christi, Texas, who are on their
most
ing
size,
ing
©nue
for
many
flowers
of
The
'group
world
blue
which
or
ever,
and
for
habit
only
but
ing
and
ex
an
pus
I way to New London, Conn.
PACIFISTS HOLD CONFERENCE.
more
forms
types
or
New York, May 29—(By Union As.
1 socia'ted Press)—Pacifists from many
sectionsjof U)js United States are gath
ering here today to participate in the
pacificist conference which opens to
morrow under the direction of the Em
ergency Peace Federation. The meet
ing is termed "The First American
Conference for Democracy and Terms
of Peace," and those in charge have
'had a rather stormy time in prepar
ing for the conference because of the
widespread opposition to the move
ment in many quarters.
HOME
TOWN
HELPSfcü
tiful
ber
are
HARM IN "KNOCKING" TOWN
if City äovsmment Is Not What It
Should Be There Are Other Reme
dies, It Is Urged.
It is easy to fall into a habit of
petty criticism and detraction either of
individuals or Institutions. In the ono
case, when directed by one person
against another it is co nmonly and
rightfully classed as malicious gossip
or slander. In the other case it Is
sometimes loftily designated as an exhi
bition of public spirit. Both are alike,
a shnme and disgrace to the perpetra
tors, an evil that should be suppressed,
says the Indianapolis Star.
Men, naturally enterprising, who, un
der favorable circumstances, would
push the Interests of the community,
are deterred by the feeling that they
would meet with criticism and have
encouragement, and saying to them
i selves "what's the use?" remain pas
sive, leaving other cities to go forward
! where thetrs makes do headway or goes
1 back. Outside capitalists who hear
the echoes of this detraction go else
! where with their factories and shops.
If a city government is not what il
should be, there are formal and order
ly means of reforming It. If a police
force is inefficient, a remedy Is possi
ble without giving to the world the Im
pression that crime is rampant and
life unsafe there by day or night. It
public service corporations do not act
squarely and fairly by the people,
there are legitimate remedies for such
If any public officer
to
18
to
.
no
by
or
after
conditions,
makes mistakes, there are other ways
of reaching him than by branding him
as a rascal of the blackest dye. Men
in public office, being human, have
been known to be open, to friendly re
monetrance.
But the common scold, either in pri
vate or pébllc. never accomplishes
good.
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BACKYARD GARDENING PAYS

m
Cleveland Has Tried Flan for Five
Years to Its Profit, and Many Other
Cities-Have Taken Up the Idea.
**A vegetable garden for every home,"
Is the new slogan in Ontario, and It
is a slogan worth while. The provin
cial government has launched n sys
tematic campaign for backyard agri
culture, and It proposes to show every
householder how he may, by domestic
farming, combat the increasing cost of
living and the growing scarcity of food
atuffs, says the Cleveland Plain Dealer.
One of the alms of thq Ontario gov
ernment is, of course, so to Increase
the available food supply at home as
to enable the contribution of still more
to the hardrpressed motherland. But
the plan most be broader In Its résulta
Backyard gardening pays. ' Cleveland
.S) has tried Tt?These five years past, to
I Its profit^ and scores of other eitle*
S' have taken up the idea. The earth U
W the aourctrof wealth. The man who
cultivates a. plot of ground contribute»
^ to the welfare of all mankind.
* The new Canadian movement owes
® Its origin to the stress of war. It i*
the kind of movement which perpetu
ates itself. The man, the woman or
the child who once knows the delight
@ of growing 1 things Is always the better
@) t or it, end so is his community. Thl»
1 country can follow with profit the ex
K ample In Intensive cultivation wBlck
la t<> furnish.
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? put trio
It looks dally more doubtful whether
be beaten into plow
■pears will ,
shares in timer for next eprlng • plow
log.
As some Christians view It, Sunday
a dpy. AO celebrate -by going to
church MwJ hmdo* a nickel's worth of
salvation, '
Roughly estimated, the difference be
tween the much-lauded old-fashioned
apple and the present scientific product
Is about two cents.
1 1 The word "kultur" has been incorpo
rated into the language, but certain
* puriste stIU draw the line at "bomb
'-'Mir"
Wl
ASTER
fine
The aster is certainly one of tbs
most satisfactory of the unnual flower
ing plunts. The great variety in its
size, color, form, and season of bloom
ing makes it a most satisfactory plant
In fact,
for
a
for supplying cut flowers.
of the Improved sorts produce
many
flowers equal in form and size to some
of the better sorts of chrysanthemums.
The range of color presented in this
'group is one of its chief merits.
Strange as It may appear, the plant
world is not very well supplied with
blue flowers possessing characters
which render them suited to- domestic
or commercial uses. In the aster, how
ever, are found many shades of blue
and purple und for this reason, if
for no other, the aster should prove
attractive decorative plant. The
habit of growth adapts the aster not
only to close planting for cut bloom,
but some forms are rol>us© tall-grow
ing plants, well adapted for use in an
herbaceous border where late bloom
and careless effects are desired. The
compact-growing, large-flowered
an
more
forms are most desirable for cut
blooms, while the tall-growing, open
types are most useful In wild gardens
or for screens. The wild aster (aster
V
»
Aster.
novae-angllae) Is one of the most beau
tiful and most satisfactory of this
latter class. The vigor and ease of
culture of the aster are factors which
contribute to its popularity. !
Plants from seed sown In the open
ground In May bloom finely ln Septem- ,
ber and October, when the flowers
are seen at their best. For July and
August bloom, seeds should be sown In j
March or April in a cold frame, spent.
hotbed, or in pots or boxes in a living
. Cover the seeds about half an
inch deep with rich, light soil and
when the jffants have three or four
transfer them to thumb pots or
It
of
of
Is
il
Im
and
It
act
such
room
leaves
to other boxes, setting the plants about,
two inches apart each way. After all |
danger of frost is past transplant the
plants so treated to their permanent |
home, where they should stand about
18 inches apart each way In well-pre-1
pared beds. Fresh manure or manure
used in too large quantities sometimes ]
proves injurious to asters. Only thor-1
oughly composted manure mixed with |
the soil is safe for these plants. Small i
quantities of air-slaked lime, or of
fresh wood ashes, stirred into the sur
face of the aster beds prove benefleial
to the plants. When given plenty of
water and rich, fine soil asters can be
grown into beautiful pot plants.
. In some localities and during some
the aster is seriously attacked
seasons
by the so-called black potato beetle
blister beetle (epicauta Pennsyl
vania), an Insect which feeds upon
the partly developed buds, causing
them to develop, if at all, into de
formed^ irregular blossoms. In such
localities asters can be successfully
under screens of mosquito net
or
grown
ting or other thin cloth.
him
Men
have
re
pri
GAILLARDIA
In the galliardlas are found both
annual and perennial plants offering
a wide selection of varieties and a
profusion of bloom over a long period.
The blooming period begins early and
continues late in autumn. They are
well adapted to mixed borders and are
very satisfactory as cut flowers. The
stems are of good length, carry the
Five
It
sys
agri
every
of
food
gov
as
more
But
to
eitle*
U
who
owes
i*
or
delight
better
Thl»
ex
wBlck
Ü
I
um
Qalllardla.
flowers well, end keep fresh as cut
flowers for a long time when placed In
water.
The annual galliardlas are all propa
gated readily from seeds sown tn the
open, but earlier flowers will be se
cured by sowing se^is in s hotbed
and transplanting the plants to the
open as soon as killing frosts havs
passed. In either case the blooming
pUmts should not stand closer than
10 or 12 inches, They grow and bloom
best when fully exposed to sun and
sir, and when planted on a fertlla
but light and well-drained solL
plow
plow
NEW LINE TO SOUTH AMERICA.
Baltimore, May 29— (By Union Ä£ y
sociatcd Pres»)—A mow line between
the United States and South America
will bo inaugurated tomorrow when
the first vessel of the newly organ
ized Baltimore-South American Nav
igation Company sails for Brazil. It
is said that $16,000,000 of Southern
capital has been invested in the enter
prise, which was sponsored by the B»l*,
tiqurt * Ohio r»Uio»<!' , . „
Sunday
to
of
be
product
incorpo
certain
"bomb

Health and

One of the most popular resortadn Am South is i
fine roads for motoring, new garage, every
every night, concerts, new bowling alleys,
season, with music by BUD SCOTT.
?
d ia«d
The mineral waters at Browns Wells have been known i
for fifty years for all stomach and liver troublas, and for ■
a two weeks stay might save a sick spelL Write for our book of views. I
BROWNS WELLS HOTEL,-H*zlehurst, MMarippL
$3» « ? ;
$ THE BATH IS BEST •,
Hr
■ for young and old when tbs
Be, best plumbing makes for sanl
/A* tary precautions. Elegance,
(//'•• convenience and comfort are
*r. A enjoyed when our open work
(pVjJ plumbing it installed. Wp guar
antee that our workmanship ia
i of the highest order. Our
? prices are really' reasonable.
*St
m
: H
W
£
« v
J. D. LANHAM
Plumbing, Heating and Electrical Work
PHONE 55
GREENWOOD, MISS.
$20.45
Greenwood, Miss.
to
WASHINGTON D.. C. AND RETURN
via
Southern Railway in Mississippi
account
UNITED CONFEDERATE VETERANS
REUNION
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JOHN ASHCRAFT
I
DATES OF SALE: JUNE 1st to 6th, INCLUSIVE.
Final Limit: June 2lBt, with privilege of extension until July 6th by
depositing ticket and paying fee of 50 cents.
STOPOVERS ALLOWED
m
J. L. COX, A. G. F. ft P. A,
C. RUDOLPH, G. P. A.,
St. Louis, Mo.
Columbus, Miss.
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WARNER WELLS
»SHCHIFT & WELLS
ANY FEATURE OF INSURANCE
1st Floor Wilson Bank Building.
PHONE 460.
■i
+**•
•***<
4
LEFLORE GROCER GO.
WHOLESALE
GREENWOOD, HISS.
s»«e»»»e*»»»*»*** »» »**»* * *** * '* . *' | ' i> ** l ^+****' ' ' > *** * * * ** * ** fe |i|
a
•****>H**************************** m ****************
G. E. WRIGHT IGE & COAL CO.
Mississippi
'PHONE 45
Greenwood,
Dealers in
All Grades of Coal
-MANUFACTURERS OF
ICE
Ice Cream and Carbonated Drinks;
also Bottlers of Coca-Cola.
n
unir -■iii»»Mi<m***«*H** llll< ——***—*
cut
In
the
se
the
and
R. P. PARISH, Sec'y and TrUaa
W. S. BARRY, Pres.
FIRE INSURANCE!
»V
D0D6ING RC5P0NSIB1LITY
GfTS A MANS REPUTATION
ALL OUT OF SHAPE!
K
eOe
Ä£ y
when
Nav
It
enter
B»l*,
We keep our business reputation in good shape by
satisfaction-guarantee motto. If you insure wjth .US Wrrs gomg
mike sure that you're pleased before the traflsaetk* is eloseo. ^ ,
GREENWOOD AGENCY CO.. INC.
PHONE ' GREENWOOD » MISS
XAKE TH£i DAILX CÖMMQft

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