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Hattiesburg daily news. (Hattiesburg, Miss.) 1907-1908, September 25, 1907, Image 3

Image and text provided by Mississippi Department of Archives and History

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87065163/1907-09-25/ed-1/seq-3/

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INSURANCE
iD $2,000 POLICY IN KNIGHTS OF
THE MACCABEES.
Bmptness of the Payment Speaks
^fcll for That Splendid Order—Mr.
W. Katz Was Largely Responsible
ffor Adjustment of the Claim.
A The readers of the Dally News will
remember the death of Mr. Jake See
ger som time since who was so badly
Injured in an accident in the lath
mill at the Newman Lumber Com
pany's plant that he died before he
could be removed from the scene of
the fatal happening.
Through the kind services of Mr.
H. Katz, the amount of Insurance due
the (a'tnlly from, the Knights of the
Maccabees of the World, $2,000 has
been collected and the amount paid
over to the widow.
Besides being an Odd Fellow, Mr.
Seeger belonged to the order named
and carried the amount of insurance
mentioned above.
Mr. Katz as one of the committee
appointed by the Odd Fellows to look
after the Interests of widows and or
phans of members of thajt order, took
up the matter of Insurance with the
proper officials of the Maccabees, in
Nina, Pa., and within three weeks the
matter wsb settled and the amount
paid over to Mrs. Seeger.
"The promptness with which set
tlement of the claim was made," said
Mr. Katz to a Daily News reporter,
"speaks eloquently of the system
maintained by the Knights of the Mac
cabees and was moBt gratifying to
the widow and to us. For her and
ourselves we wish to make a proper
and suitable public acknowledgment
of the payment of the insurance
claim."
Mrs. Seeger Is still residing In her
comfortable home in the city and will
probably remain here altogether.
JOSEPH FOLK
AT NASHVILLE
Continued from Page Two.
for the state to support him as a
pauper. He has no right to ruin the
child physically, mentally and moral
ly, as may be the result when chil
dren of tender years are put to work
In some great factory. The state Is
Interested in theBe children, for they
are to be the future men and women
of the commonwealth and the Btate
should be concerned in having them
good citizens, npt bad. These factor
ies are the milestones In the progress
of the state, already great in waving
fields of golden grain, In mountains
of preciopB metals and in splendid
cities. But these do not constitute
s' state. The state consists of , Its
men and women. In proportion as
these are true to' high ideals they
safeguard the priceless privilege of
liberty and add to the strength of
the nation. These men and women
/Btake—th« spirit of America. May
y there be ipore of tbla spirit In
^ public and .private life, for this Is
vthe spirit W^ich has given us liber
ty and freedofn, this Is the sprllt that
has made the United States the great
est nation In he world. We no not
attempt to prove by the processes of
logic or the citation of statistical
legal learning that freedom Is the just
heritage of all mankind. If freedom
depended upon such defenses she
would become hopelessly entangled
as she was for years In the webs of
sophistry. Scholars may prove the
expediency of monarchy; theologians
may demonstrate its divine right; but
appealing to the higher law of moral
truth we know that tyranny is worng,
that monarchy Is a hideous error, and
that the patriot-martyr Richard Rum
bold, wjis right when he declared up
on the scaffold with his last breath
and In tones that will ring in the ears
of humanity for a thousand genera
tions, "No one cometh Into the world
jvlth a saddle on his back, neither any
booted /id spurred to ride him."
There are not wanting today scholars
who affirm that there is no such thing
as natural right, and who employ the
logic of the schools to prove It. But
conscience tells qs that there is.
Equality of opportunity Is the natuipL
al right of all mankind. The right ol
each man to join with his fellqws
In the making of laws to govern each
man In hts relations with his fellow
man and to which all owe obedience
and respect, Is the inalienable right
of all. In proof of this we appeal to
the same law by which we justify
Magna Charts and the Declaration of
Inlependenee—tlm law 1 , that is higher
tbijpiysonatllutions, courts and kings—
■■ seaik
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or
mmfft&wmzERs are
HOLDING ANNUAL CONVENTION
Associated Press.
Atlantic City, N. J„ September 24.—
Leading bankers and financiers from
every state of the union and from
and Hawaii, representing untold mll
llous of wealth, are assembled in the
Marlborough-Blenheim hotel , where
American Bankers' association has es
tablished official headquarters. The
general convention will be palled to
order at 10 o'clock tomorrow morn
ing. Special sessions were held to
day by the trust company, savings
banks and clearing house sections,
and the organizations of secretaries of
state bankers' associations vnl
meeting this evening.
Speakers at today's sectional ses
sions included Charles Emory Smith,
ex-postmaster general and ex-ambas
sador to Russia; Festus J. Wade, of
St. Louis; John T. Woodruff, of
Springfield, Mo.; Benjamin I. Cohen,
of Portland, Oregon; Frederick Phil
lips, of New York; George B. Pendle
ton, of Newbern, N. C.; F. A. Scott,
of Cleveland; Charles K. Zug, of Phil
adelphia; and J. W. Cleveland, of
New York.
An amusing feature of the day was
a roller chair parade on the famous
board walk, in which all the delegates
and visitors participated.
^Speakers on tomorrow's program in
clude Governor Edwin C. Stokes, of
New Jersey; and Governor Claude
Swanson, of Virginia. A reception
and grand ball will be given at the
Marlborough-Blenheim in the evening.
The currency commission, of which
Hon. A. Garton Hepburn is chair
man, will presept Its report Tuesday,
amj this will likely lead to a spirited
discussion. A clam bake will be the
principal amusement feature of the
day.
1 hold a
Friday will be devoted to dis
cussions of practical banking ques
tions, the transaction of unfinished
business and the election and instal
lation of officers, after which the con
vention will adjourn.
One of the most Important questions
to be considered during the meeting
Is the uniform bill of lading which
railroad, commercial and banking in
terests are seeking to bring into har
mony with their views, preliminary
to its being finally passed upon by
the interstate commerce commission
and made effective by that body. It
is stated that bankers advocating
money upon bills of lading must today
look to the standing and character of
the shipper rather to any supposed
security of the bill of lading.
Improvements, such as advocated
by the American Bankers' assoclatioh,
it is said, would benefit not only the
CESS.
\
HATTIESBURG TRUST
•«» BANKING CO.
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Hattiesburg Trust &
Banking Company
INCORPORATED AD 1905
OFFICERS
H. A. CAMP, President
JOE SHELBY r Vice-President
JNO, KAMPER, 2nd Vice-President
R. L. BENNETT, Cashier
R. B. M'LEOD, Asst. Cashier
,
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Hattiesburg, Miss.
1
7«7
Savings Accounts
.4
V
for children offord a most desirable method
of providing for future education, for a
start in business or to provide for some fut
ure need.
4 per cent on savings deposits of one dol
lar or more.
4 per cent interest on Certificates of De
posit in amounts of $500.00 or more.
Why not start a savings account for the
children just now that they are getting
ready for school. It might encourage them
to study harder.
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DIRECTORS
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H. A. CAMP
JOE SHELBY
M. J. EPLEY
W. G. GILLESPIE
T. W. KENNON
R. S. HALL
HERMAN KATZ
W
A. J. HARRIS
W. .E HERREN
N. BATSON
M. E. CADENHEAD
R. W. HINTON
M. J. BETHUNE
JNO. KAMPER
T. M. FULLER
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FRONT ST
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banker, but also the producer and
consumer, since it would add to the
facility and economy of marketing
the agricultural products and manu
factured goods of the country.
Present officials of the American
Bankers' association are: G. S. Whit
son, New York, resident; J. D. Pow
ers, Louisville, first vice-president;
George K. Reynolds," Chicago, chair
man executive council; James Rj
Branch, New York, secretary; A. A.
Crane, Minneapolis, treasurer; Wil
liam G. Fltzwllson, New York,
slstant secretary.
Things Theatrical
Broke All Records.
"The Umpire," it Is probably un
necessary to say,-Is the musical com
edy which played 350 times in Chi
cago, breaking all records in that
neighborhood, and establishing itself
as the biggest favorite ever produced
in that city. "The Umpire" story con
cerns amusing and dramatic adven
ijures of a baseball umpire, who tem
porarily blinded by a smile from a
pair of pretty eyes in the grand stand,
makes a bad decision and is forced to
flee the country to escape the indig
nation of the "fans." His itinerary
takes him to Morocco, where, because
there is no etradition treaety, a col
ony of high-class American criminals
haB been formed. These include a
corporation "grafter" and his shifty
lawyer. There is also an American se
cret service agent, and an American
girl who Is trying to shield from pun
ishment her brother who has stolen
diplomatic records from the govern
ment archives. The fair intrigante Is
the object of the adoration of the
crooked American consul as well as
that of the clever young secret service
agent. Into these complications the
umpire comes and is himself compli
cated. Meanwhile a steady stream
of pretty musie and dancing runs
through the proceedings, illuminating
the action and lightening the plot.
This feature is provided by the fam
ous "Umpire" broilers, the rogueish
band of alluring sprites that made Chi
cago sit up and take notice during
their long sojourn there. The excel
lent cast which Manager Askin has
assembled for "The Umpire" includes
Joe Whitehead, whom the dramatic
critics pronounce funnier than Eddie
Foy; Dorothy Webb, Virginia Ains
worth, Helena Ballinger, John Hynes,
Harry Hanlon, Chas. Horn, Joe West
and a chorus of sixty.
At the Auditorium Monday night,
September 30.
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HENRY M. WHITNEY.
Henry M. Whitney, who desires to run for governor of Massachusetts on
the Democratic ticket. Is a wealthy Bostonian and a brother of the late Wil
liam C. Whitney. Several years ago he attempted to quote President Roosevelt
concerning Canadian reciprocity, and the president at once declared him eligi
ble to membership in the newly formed Ananias club which later took in
Bellamy Storer, E. H. Hurrlman and others at the president's Instance.
ST
The Genuine Worth
Incorporated in
FORBES PIANOS
Is admitted by compentent musical experts. Musicians who have used
the Forbes Piano for many years are invariably enthusuastic regarding
these instruments. The test of time has been applied without the devel
opment of a fault. ::: ::: ::: ::: ::: ;;; «•
The superb musical qualities, the architectual beauty of the Forbes Piano
make it a most desirable instrument for the refined
purchased at exceedingly reasonable prices on terms to suit the
ience of the customer Investigate this piano, and about twenty other
makes incluning the Everett, Ivers & Pond, Kranich fic Bach, Krell
French, before making your decision.
They can be
musician.
. iillWil
E. E. FORBES PIANO CO.
C. J. ROBERTS, Mgr.,
East Capital Street.,
Opposite Postoffice
J
V
JACKSON, MISSISSIPPI.
7
Don't Put It
It may mean success in later
years if you start a bank ac
count right now. The warning
' should be heeded by young men
that want their own homes in
the future, not to spend every
thing as they go, but to Save
what they can from their week
ly salary and deposit it in a safe
institution like the
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First National Bank
If
Your AccountSolicited
j ^The First Nation al Bank of Hattiesburg^
Go To
HARDY
The One-Gallus Liveryman
-.-.- — For ======
...ANYTHING TO RIDE IN.
The Only Second-Class
Livery in The City.
Mobile Street
Both Phones 57
Jno. A. Wise
C. C. Gerow
WISE & GEROW
Cotton, Stocks, Grain and Provisions
Upstairs, Hightower Buildt
Hatties^,
Both Phones 758
::
-
Anything You f*
Try a News Want

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