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Hattiesburg daily news. (Hattiesburg, Miss.) 1907-1908, October 08, 1907, Image 1

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SBURG D
i . j,
HATTIESBURG, MISSISSIPPI, TUESDAY MORNING, OCTOBER 8?
I. NO. 152.
weeks
BIG RAILWAY
1
Important Test Case Will Be Heard
in United States Circuit Court
at St Joseph.
SECRETARY OF STATE IS
ENJOINED BY THE RAILROADS
8tate Statute Provides That Railroads
Forfeit Their Charters When They
Seek to Transfer Litigation From
State to Federal Courts.
Associated press.
St. Joseph, Mo., October 7.—A
hearing will be held tomorrow on
the application of the Atchison, To
peka & Santa Fe railroad for a per
manent injunction restraining John E.
Swanger, secretary of state from in
forcing the law providing for the re
vocation of the license of a foreign
railroad which shall remove a suit
or proceed to any federal court frpm
a lower court. A temporary restrain
ing order to this effect was issued
^ some time ago by Judge Smith Mc
^ Pherson of t;he United States circuit
court, and attorneys for the Santa Fe
railroad will appear tomorrow and
argue that the order should be made
permanent. The decision in the case
is awaited with great interest, as it
is believed it will have a profound ef
fect in the controversy now being
waged over state rights.
The case grew out of the intention
of the Santa Fe road's legal depart
ment to remove a damage suit brought
in the Macon county Circuit court to
the federal court. The state law pro
hibiting such action was passed at
the last session of the legislature and
provides that if any foreign railroad
doirtg business in Missouri, shall re
move any suits or legal proceedings
\ to any federal court or bring certain
A suits against any citizen In the fed
eral courts, the secretary of state
shall be empowered to revoke
license. The railroad company asks
that this law be declared unconstitu
tional and that the secretary of state
be restrained by the federal courts
from putting it into effect.
its
I
RIOTER8 PUNISHED.
Chinese Government Makes An Ex
ample of Them.
Kanchow Fu, October 7.—For par
ticipation iin the recent riots here the
Chinese government has arrested and
punished twenty rioters. One hun
dred Boxers have been killed by the
government troops at Canan Fu.
WON'T COME UP.
Trial of Mrs. Bradley In Washington
Will Be Poetponed.
Washington, October 7.—The trial
-M. Bradley, indicted for
no mnc jiCr of former United States
Senator Brown of Utah, was sched
uled to begin today, but it will'»roba
of Mrs. Am
JAPAN NEUTRAL;
HI HOSTILE
t
I . Associated Press.
I The Hague, October 7.—The ehtire
[Anglo-American peace project was ap
proved this afternoon by the commit
tee on arbitration, the vote resulting
J
EMPLOYERS FAVOR
THE OPEN SHOP PLAty
■Daily News Special,
k Battle Creek, Mich., October 7.—
■Employers of labor and business men
"from 1 many states are present today
at the fifth annual meeting of the
Citizens' Industrial Association of
• America, which has for Its object the
promotion of "industrial freedom" and
the open shop. C. W. t'ost, of this
ejty, is the leader In the movement.
:s that the fight' on the la
Jy^made ¥ r «* t
bly be another month or six weeks
before the case comes up. The post
ponement Is due to the desire of Dis
trict Attorney Baker for more time
In which to prepare for the trial. The
accused woman, who underwent an
operation some time ago, is reported
now to be in good health.
BLACKSMITHS MEET.
Their Union In Session In Mllwau
kee.
Milwaukee, Wis., October 7.—The
eleventh biennial convention of the
International Brotherhood of Black
smiths and Helpers assembled here to
day and was called to order by Presi
dent J. W. Kline. The convention will
be in session several days, transacting
routine business, listening to the re
ports of the officers and considering
several proposed amendments to the
constitution.
TO WELCOME TAFT.
The Chinese Guilds Pass Appropriate
Resolutions.
Shanghai, October 7.—Chinese rep
resenting thirty-four guilds of Shang
hai have sent a welcome letter to
Secretary Taft, who Is expected to
arrive here on Tuesday.
BURGLAR ENTERS
YORKE'S STORE
TAKE3 TWO BOTTLES OF POP
AND SOME CIGARS.
Small Negro Boy is Suspicioned—He
Was 8een Counting Pennies, But
Had Not Been Arrested up to a Late
Hour Last Night.
Some time Sunday night the store
of J. W. Yorke, opposite the Klondyke
hotel on Main street was 'entered, the
cash drawer rifled and some goods
stolen from the stock.
There is no clue to the perpetrators
of the robbery.
When seen yesterday morning Mr.
Yorke said to a Daily News reporter
that the store was entered from the
rear, a pick being used to break the
lock and afterwards used to pry open
the cash drawer by the side of which
it was left standing.
After taking the small sum of money
mostly coppers, which was left In the
cash drawer over night the midnight
visitors helped themselves to a couple
of bottles of "pop" which they left,
half-emptied, on the counter. Then
they took whatever they wanted in
the way of cigars and cigarettes but
in so small a quanfltyas to be hardly
All of which
noticeable and left,
showed that money was what the rob
bers wanted.
Mr. Yorke said that he was told by
one gentleman, Mr. Jolt Barron, that
he had seen a little negro boy on the
streets busily engaged in counting a
number of copies that he Bad in a
yellow paper bag and he is of the opin
ion that tbose were the pennies he had
lost.
The police were notified of the rob
bery but up to a late hour last night
no arrests in this connection had been
made.
Ger
dissentlng governments *\? re
many, Austria Hungary, Swit5C' an< *'
Belgium, Roumanla, Greece, Tut 5 ® 3 ^
Bulgaria and Montenegro.
Italy, Japan and Luxembourg ,
not vote. j V 1
within the iast year. In its platform
the association demands:
"No closed shop; no restriction as
to the use of tools, machinery or ma
terial, except such as are unsafe; no
limitation'of output; no restriction as
to the number of apprentices and
helpers, when of proper age; no boy
cott; no sympathetic strike; no sac
rifice of independent workmen to the
labor union, and no compulsory use
of the union label."
"I ACCUSE."
go<
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.UTED Mam
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—Taylor in Los Angolas Time*.
NEGRO MURDERER
BEHIND THE BARS
ED CURRAN CAPTURED BY CON
STABLE DOSSETT.
t
Coon Was Wanted for a Murder Com
mitted in Lawrence County in June,
1906.—Was Arrested at Nicholson,
La., and Is Now in Hattiesburg Jail.
Constable John Dossett returned
yesterday from Nicholson, La., bring
ing wth him a negro, Ed Curran,
wanted for murder in Lawrence
county and for whom the officers of
several counties have been looking
ever since June, 1906.
The negro Curran, killed
another
negro at Prentiss in June, 1906, and
made his get-a-way and had not been
seen since, but the officers had. not
forgotten him. When a letter was re
ceived here a few
that the "time" due
to Nicholson the fact tie
to' Constable Dossett and that officer
immediately made his ararngements
to get to Nicholson Just about the
time that the remittance was due
there.
Sunday afternoon he arrived at
Nicholson and found that he had ar
rived on the same train as the man's
"tiTr 1 -" after seeing the agent the
''•'■S-o was notified that his money
had arrived and when he came to
draw the amount due him he was
placed under arrest. He bitterly de
nied that he was the man wanted,
claiming that it was his brother but
he was brought to Hattiesburg never
theless and locked np in the county
jail where he awaints identification by
parties who can be sure of the man.
Constable Dossett says that there
was only the statutory reward out for
the arrest of this man and that he (b
sure that he has the right one.
■ .'ago asking
. nn be sent
known
^
1
MAY BE UNLAWFUL.
Hamilton, Ont., October 7.—The suit
brought to have the Dominion Whole
sale Grocers' Guild declared unlawful
will be tried at the fall assizes, which
J opened before Chief Justice Falcon
bridge today. It is expected that a
la* e
numbei of witnesses will be
1 !^ and that the trial of the case
will las a week or longer.
*♦♦♦*'♦***♦*♦♦♦*♦♦*
JR. ADVERTISER.
- <
^ily News meets every
❖ morning f a,n out of H:lttlesburg
❖ It reachet ever , y town f°
❖ miles ,cf t! 6 ctiy noon
ilea tion. If y
F % of the smaller
to Hattiesburg,
it by using the
Dally News.
as
no
as
•>

❖ The
❖ the day o
•> want the
❖ towns tribu^B
❖ you can sedW
❖ columns of tF.
4- ♦ f
MISS GLADYS VANDERBILT
AND HER MILLIONS ARE IVON
BY A HUNGARIAN NOBLEMAN
New York, October 7.—Formal an
nouncement of the engagement of
Miss Gladys Vanderbilt to Count
Laszlo Szechenyi of Budapest, Is
made today. No date has been set
for the wedding, but It is expected
that It will take place at the Break
ers, . the Vanderbilt mansion in New
port, some time this autumn. The
count, who is the youngest son of the
late Court Almerlch Szechenyi, for
some years ambassador from Aus
tria-Hungary to Germany, is now in
Newport. He Is 28 years old, rich
and go.vd looking, has an hereditary
seat in the Hungarian parliament and
is one of the chamberlains of the
Austrian emperor.
Announcement of the engagement
will be received with great interest
both here and in Europe, owing to the
prominence of both families. Miss
Vanderbilt inherited from her father,
the late Cornelius Vanderbilt, a for
tune of more than $10,000,000. She
came into possession of this inheri
tance last August.
Miss Vanderbilt is the youngest
child of Cornelius and Mrs. Vander
bilt, and was introduced to New York
society three years ago.
When the count arrived at New
port Miss Vanderbilt met him at the
railway station and drove him to The
Breakers, the • famous
palace, which was opened yesterday
for the first time in two years.
Miss VanderblTt, the dispatches
state, spent the whole day with the
count in drives and walks and when
she was not alone with him, her
Vanderbilt
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mother was an enthusiastic thlr party.
The count arrived from Bremen
late Tuesday night. Alfred and Regi
nald Vanderbilt met the count,
whisked him off in a motor car for a
hasty supper at one of their clubs and
later saw he was Installed In a pri
vate car bound for Newport.
Newport's first impression of the
count, it is Btated, was decidedly fav
orable.
ENGAGEMENT MADE IN EUROPE.
Vienna, October 3.—The report
made public In the United States that
Miss Gladys Vanderbilt, daughter of
Cornelius Vanderbilt, was engaged to
be married to a Hungarian nobleman
has been cabled back here. It is now
recalled that when Jfrs. Cornelius
Vanderbilt and her daughter were
here about a month ago they spent
much time in the company of Count
Lasselo Szechenyi, and even visited
his estate at Porpace, in liungary.
Count 8zecheynl belongs to an an
cient family. He is 28 years of age,
a court chamberlain and a lieutenant
in the reserves. His eldest brother,
Count Dyonls Szechenyi, married
Countess Caraman Chtmay. It is be
lieved here that the count's engage
ment to Miss Vanderbilt possibly was
settled during the visit to Porpace.
MABEL CLARE BARRON.
The friends of Mr. and Mrs. J. N.
Barron are offering their condolences
on the death of little Mabel Clare
Barron whose funeral was held es
terday afternoon from the residence,
524 West Laurel street, at 3 o'clock.
A large number of sympathizing
go<
the losH
greatly bl
FOUR
This is the Prediction^
St. Louis Ballooiv
Boston, Mass., October 7.—
that the ballons In the great lutm^H
tlonal flying race at St. Louis wilr
not remain In the air for more than
twenty-four hours," says A. Lawrence
Rotsh at the Blue Hill Observatory.
"We knof so much concerning the
atmospherical conditions that I think
I am safe in making a prediction con
cerning the races. The balloons will
be sent up on the afternoon of Octo
ber 21 at about 3 o'clock, as ffie gas
will not be heated before that time
Assuming that there is a southeast
wind blowing, the balloons will go
noytheast at the rate of ten mfles an
hour. At the end of the first hour the
balloons will be 8,000 feet in the air,
and will be progressing at the rate of
twenty-five miles an hour."
f
men, Asked to be Relieved and a
■> <• •> <• •> <• •> •> <• •> •>
THE WEATHER. *>

« Washington, October 7.—For >»
* MIssissipt: Tuesday fair with 4
❖ occasional showers in southern <>
4 portion; Wednesday fair and 4
■> colder.
JOE WILLIAMS
BEHIND THE BARS
FORMER NEGRO BANKER HAD TO
MAKE NEW BOND.
Minnie Durant, One of His Bonds
New Bond Had to be Made by Wil
-Again Released.
Harm
Joe Williams, formerly connected
with a negro bank here and who is
charged with the murder of an of
ileal of that Institution but who ha3
been at liberty under a bond, was
given up by one of his bondsmen yes
terday and placed in jail.
The surety who gave Williams up
Is a negro woman, Minnie Durant by
name, who refuses to make any state
ment as to her motives although she
denies the statement of Williams that
she gave him up because he refused
to loan her money.
The negro Williams has been under
$11,000 bonds In two cases—one on
the charge of murder and the other
for embezzlement of the bank's funds
and haVing fixed tbose bonds he had
hoped to remain at liberty until the
November term of the circuit court.
But the woman gave him up and he
was locked up.
However, he got busy through his
friends and late yesterday afternoon,
Deputy Sheriff Holliman Informed a
Daily News reporter that Williams had
been released on a new bond whlcfi
was really better than the old one.
SECRETARY LATTA
LOST IN SWAMPS
Associated Press.
New Orleans, La., October 7.—As
sistant Secretary Latta left here this
morning to join the president near
Lake Providence, but has thus far
failed to put in his appearance in the
president's camp. It is believed that
it may be necessary to send a rescue
party to locate him.
Advices from Stamboui, the tele
graph station where the president and
his party are stopping indicate that
the sport is excellent. A number of
bears have already been spotted.
Assistant Secretary Latta carried a
number of personal letters for the
president, including two with White
House monograms.
i
TWENTY-TWO KILLED.
Tobolsk, Siberia, October 7—A gang
of convicts who were being escorted
here from eastern Siberia, attacked
the guards yesterday and wounded six
of them. The guards fired on the
convicts, twenty-two of whom were
killed.

•>

MAI
Conference Will Rei
Throughout
Which a Trip Will Be MaJM
the Great Mississippi Delta.
Wedm
.;. * * * * * * <. * * * * * .> * •> *
❖ DELEGATES REPRESENT *
❖ ENORMOUS CAPITALIZATION. •>


v Associated Press.
❖ Atlanta, Ga., October 7.— •>
❖ More than 500 delegates were ❖
❖ present here today when the •>
❖ convention of the International •>
❖ Cotton Spinners was called to •>
❖ order. A majority- of the dele- ❖
❖ gates represent European mills <•
❖ and are intensely interested in ❖
❖ the cotton producing industry in •>
❖ the South. A close canvass of •>
❖ the delegates today resuited in ❖
❖ the startling disclosure that ❖
❖ more than four billions of dollars •>
❖ is represented, which makes this ❖
♦ the greatest industrial conven- •>
•5* tion ever before held in the •>
•> history of the world.
❖ Governor Hoke Smith de- ❖
❖ livered the address of welcome ❖
❖ and his remarks were frequently *0*
❖ applauded by the European dele- ❖
❖ gates. He advocated the ellmin- ❖
❖ ation of speculation in futures. <*
Governor Comer was followed *5*
❖ by Congressman Thomas Heflin, ❖
❖ of Alabama, who startled the <•
❖ assemblage by a fiery speech In ♦
❖ opposition to the buoketshap.vfr'"
❖ and closed with a resolution ♦
❖ memorializing congress and the ❖
•> British parliament to prohibit ♦
❖ speculation in futures. During <•
•> the course of his remarks he «8t
•> brought out the fact that the <-'4^
❖ British parliament had once de- ❖
❖ feated a bill seeking to make
❖ such speculation illegal.
❖ Other delegates followed and ❖ *
❖ several impassioned speeches <• Jj
❖ were delivered on the desira- t* ' ;
•> bility of eliminationg the middle ❖
•> man from the cotton business. •!*
❖ The spinners will adjourn late •?
❖ Wednesday evening, when they •>
❖ will start on a tour of the cot- 4 \
•> ton belt, visiting Greenwood, ❖ '
❖ Greenville and other points in •>
❖ the cotton belt.
❖ The longest stop will be made <«
❖ at Greenwood, which is the •>
•> center of the long staple region ❖
❖ and the largest inland cotton ♦
❖ market in the world.
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
Associated Press.
Atlanta, Ga., October 7.—With ad
dresses of welcome by Governor Hoke
Smith and other prominent Georgians,
the International Conference of Cot
ton Growers and Manufacturers was
formally opened in the house of rep
resentatives today. All of the impor
tant manufacturers of New England
and others froig almost every state of
the Union and from England, France,
Belgium. Germany and other foreign
countries are in attendance, the dele
gates representing an aggregate capi
tal estimated at $750,000,000. In ad
dition to the spinners, all of the im
portant cotton growers' organizations
and industries allied wth the produc
tion. manufacture or sale of cotton are
represented, including the Southern
Cotton association, the Farmers' union
and the Interstate Cotton Seed Crush
ers' association.
The conference will remain in ses
sion through tomorrow and Wednes
day. Among the subject's slated for
discussion are: Advantages of south
ern states of America for cotton grow
ing; closer relations between grow
ers and spinners; seed selection; im
proved ginning and compressing; uni
formity of bales; country damage;
warehouseing; transportation; insur
ance'; uniform classification; con
tracts of exchange; equitable tare;
buying net weight; speculation; sta
bility of price; statistics and govem
ment crop reports, and permanent
organization.
•>


•>
•IN TH
, £:

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