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Hattiesburg daily news. (Hattiesburg, Miss.) 1907-1908, October 16, 1907, Image 1

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HATTIESBURG, MISSISSIPPI, WEDNESDAY MORNING, OCTOBER 16, 1907.
i . . ■ ■ - --L.J
PRICE FIVE CENTS
t
mmM
MIS
)V
n of Requiring Uniform BUI*
Lading On All Railroads
and Steamship Lines.
IRM WILL GO INTO
EFFECT AFTER JANUARY!
Some of ths Provisions of ths Now
Bill—Commission Will Begin Heap
ing Of the Pacific Coast Case Today.
Marrlman Lines Interested.
Associated Press,
ington, October 15.—A final
healing on the proposed uniform bill
of tadlnr^s being held by the inter
state commence mission today,
when representatives of the com)s^n
carriers appeared to show cause whyTS.
the proposed form should not be
ap
proved and prescribed by the commis
sion as a just and reasonable regula
_ tion to be -observed after January 1,
1908.
^®p
Several organizations of mer
hants are also represented for the
urpose of asking an amendment
which will protect the interests of
those who pay shippers' drafts and
rely on the bills of lading attached
for protection . In the past there has
been no way to verify each bill of
lading, fevery dealer relying upon the
regulaA
states
carrier* Ira
signed bill, while in many
law doeB nbt make the
ble. No correction of this
situation has been attempted In the
new uniform bill of lading. The plan
offered by the commercial organiza
tions to remedy the difficulty Is to
have the bills of lading used for ad
vances from merchants and bankers
Issued and redeemed by number,
i n the case of . railroad tickets. If
this plan is not acceptable to the
commission, an effort will at least be
made to have a fair wording of the
documents, to- protect the holder
against fradulent issues and clearly
define his rights.
Among the conditions governing the
use of the bill, as formulated by the
commission, are' the following:
The carrier in possession of any
of the property described in a bill
of lading shall be liable for any loss
thereof or damage thereto except
under specified conditions,
sjiall not be liable for loss or damage
riot occurring on their own road
portion of the through route nor after
property has been delivered to the
next carrier, except as such liability
may be imposed by law, gqd any car
rier shall be entitled to recover from
the common carrier, railroad or trans
portation company on whose line the
damage Bhail have been sustained*the
amount of the loss it is required to
pay the owner.
' No carrier is bound to transport
" peeoerty to any partieslar vessel or
train in time for any particular mar
ket, unless by special agreement in
dorsed on the bill of lading. Property
is to be subject to necessary baling
I or cooperage at the owner's cost. Prop
erty not removed by the party
titled"to it within forty-eight hours af
ter notice of its arrival has been duly
sent or given, may be kept iri a
depot or place of delivery of the
rler, subject to reasonable charge.
No carrier will be subject to liab
ility for property of unusual value,
save under special agreement. Ship
pers shall pay freights and all other
charges accruing on property before
delivery. Additions or alterations in
bills of lading shall be without effect
and the bill infprciable according to
its original tenor.
Following today's hearing, the inter
as
v
Carriers
or

en
*



•>

car
car
Teddy Doffed His Clothes
and Plunged Into the Lake
While the Spectators Shivered
Associated Press.
Itamboul, La., October 16.—Presi
W Roosevelt was up early this
A bright fire was blazing
'/.? 5 ^HriP, but the President de
was not the least bit
;7.V.7':<J* n,le thermometer was
'-W" rest of th ' s party
Town Demolished By Explosion
35 Dead; 600 Hud; 700 Homeless
* EDMOND NR08TAND

IN BAD 8HAPE.
<0

Associated Press.
♦ Paris, October 15.—It is re
♦ ported here from Bayonne that
<0 the condition of Edmond Ros
♦ tand, the
♦ author of Cyrona, who was op
♦ erated upon ten days ago for ap
♦ pendlcltlg, does not continue to <•
♦ Improve. The patient was not ♦
♦ able to rest well at night.
French playwright,

GETTING READY
FOR BIG FIGHT
'
whyTS.
PREPARES FOR
PISH.
HARRIMAN
GREAT BATTLE
Reached Chicago at an Early Hour
Thla Morning and Will Take Part
in the Meeting of the Illinois Cen
tral Stockholders.
Associated Press.
Chicago, Oct 16.—B. H. Harriman
arrived in the city early today to take
an active part in the flght for the con
trol of the Illinois Central. He de
dined to make any statement early In
the day. The chief interest in the
struggle centered In the court room of
Judge Ball, where both sides are lined
up at the opening of court to fight for
and against the temporary Injunction
issued yesterday in response to the
request of*Mr. Fish, by which 286,731
shares of stock were for the time be
ing withdrawn from the Harriman
voting strength.
Mr. Fish was in the court room in
person, attended by his attorneys,
Messrs. Leman, Culver and Farrar,
while Wm. Nelson Cromwell, of New
York, led the fight against the injunc
tion in behalf of Mr. Harriman.
Injunction Is Sustained.
The decision of the court, rendered
late tonight, is a victory for Mr. Fish.
It provides that -the stock owned in
the Illinois Central by the Union Pa
cific officers and employes and by the
Railroad Syndicate cannot be voted
as a balance of power and that the
286,731 shares thus contested is virtu
ally void of voting strength. The Il
linois Central stock totals 950,400
shares and the Fish men claim to
have control of more than half of this,
barring the shares in controversy.
The meeting of Illinois Central
stockholders will convene at noon to
morrow%r "
•>*❖<> ❖❖❖***.>***«.♦**
THE WEATHER.


*

❖ Washington, October 16—For ❖
❖ Mississippi: Fair and slightly ❖
❖ warmer Wednesday. Thursday ❖
•> partly cloudy with light variable <•
❖ winds. ^
slate commerce commission will
morrow hear the Pacific coast
The latter is regarded as one of the
most Important complaints filed since
the passage of the new railroad rate
law. A number of railroads, including
the Harriman lines, are named as de
fendants by Paciflccoast lumber men.
to
and swam more than 100 yards. He
said the water was warmer than the
atmosphere. When the party left
camp for the chase, Mr. Rooseydlt
said that they, would not need dinner,
but at the suggestion of one ot the
guides tucked a cold lunch in his sad
dle pockets. Yesterday, (when the
camp was being moved, the President
insisted on carrying his own blankets.
" hasas j '.
o
Powder Mill Blows Up, Shaking the Surrounding Country Like A n
•>
Earthquake—-Fire Follows, Making the Towns Destruction
Complete-—Martial Law Has Been Declared.
0







<•

■>
Associated PresB.
Fontanet, Ind., October 16.—In sev
en successive explosions the mills of
the Dupont Powder Company blew up
here this moriilng, killing between
twenty-flve and thirty-live persons al
most outright, injuring 600, leveling
the city to the earth and destroying
much property within a radius of four
miles, and making a tremendous con
cussion felt at the extreme distance
of 200 miles.

Where a thriving mining town of
1,000 people stood this morning there
was tonight only wreckage. Every
building in town was wholly or par
tially thrown to the ground,
half the population remains, most of
them wearing cuts and bruises made
to the explosion.
Tftii dead and injured who Include
f of the population have
Nfir,other towns to be
Only
the otbenMj
been carried
cared for.
e mile
v morn
re at
The mills were located
south of town.
At 9:16 this
ing while seventy-five
work the first of the explosloiA'
curred. The press mill blew up !
Other exploslbns followed wtth s
ning rapidity, but the Intervq; be>
tween the first two explosions» of
about three minutes enabled
men w
oc
In
of
in
!rst
in
many of
the workmen in other portions of the
mill to Bave their lives.
Townspeople rushed from
their
homes after the flrBt explosion and
this action saved
many more lives
because in one of the later and heav
ier explosions the houses went down
like chaff before a storm.
The press
mill was followed by the blowing
of the glazing mill, by two coining
mills, and finally by the explosion of
the powder magazine containing 30,
000 kegs of powder.
The magazine was several hundred
yards away from the mills and
ignited by the Intense heat.
up
was
Ninety
minutes elapsed between the first and
last explosion.
Among the first killed
Superintendent A. E. Monehan, of the
He was killed while sitting In
his office chair and his sister-in-law
was killed at the same time in their
homo some distance awtty.-.
The heat of the bL-ning; mill drove
away many rescuers, gj
injured who might Igg
have been saved to be
Several rescuers who
gone to the assistance of the tti
nateg after the first explosion
was General
mill.
ngjinany
had
.
SrTi~
IETARY OF PEACE.
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UNDER MARTIAL LAW.
<0


Associated Press.
•> Fontanet, Ind., October 15.—
❖ The Governor tonight declared
❖ Fontanet under martial law and
❖ additional troops are being hur
❖ rled to the scene to protect the
❖ lives and property of the in
❖ jured and homeless
*
It is estimated that 5,000 sight
and
❖ seers are on the ground
❖ ghouls have been caught robbing
❖ the deserted homes and carrying
❖ away valuables from the wreck
❖ age.
❖ Thirty-five dead bodies had
❖ been found up to it o'clock and
<• several others are believed to be
❖ in the ruins. Several of the in
❖ Jured will die.
c.
killed by subsequent explosions.
Relief parties from other towns who
had rushed to the scene by wagon
and by train reported that there was
scarcely a person In the place who
did not bear the hlood
marks
either his own injuries or of
perse whom he had been caring for.
j -<f the wrecked buildings were
Jiurches, school h«use and
'ronts were blown off, sides
Vid entire stR^ctures ware
a mass c; plintered
some
two
homes'
caved ia
reduced to
boards.
Two hundred
IW8W.
schoolchild
Injured in one school.,/ ,
Two miles away at, Cqzl Bluff thra
school buildings eoUaped injuring
many children.
Four miles away a
Big Four passenger train had bvery
window blown in and many passen
ifuliy cut.
les almost unrecogniz
able were; carted away to await iden
tification. Most of the Worst injured
were taken by special train to Terre
Haute'.
gers were p
Eighteen t
Governor Henley ordered
out one
company of the. National Guard to
protect life and
property and sent
700 cots and 100 tents from the state
military supplies for the
homeless. The identified dead
use of the
are:
George Justioe, John Bobo, George
Bobo, William Sherrill, Emily Har
rington, Sylvester Blal, Orin Webster,
Will Dalton, John Yates.
PROPERTY loss heavy.
' gnet, Ind.,
the Dupont Powder Mills is es
F
October 16.—The
loss

tlmated at only $100,000, but the
is a complete wreck and the loss
aggregate almost a million.
Horror was added to horror
evening, when the wreckage took
in several quarters of the town
tonight the entire place 1 b almost
duced to a mass of smouldering ruins.
Blown 100 Yards.
Assistant Superintendent Nash,
the Dupont Powder Works was blown
100 yards by the force of the first
plosion and landed on a hillside.
was picked up unconscious, but
recover.
Many other harrowing experiences
are coming to light.
*
*



«•
<•



<8>
<•


•>
■>
<•
*

who
was
who

CRACKED BRICK WALL 35 MILES
AWAY.

Associated Press.
Indianapolis, Oct. 15.—The
shock
from the explosion which is reported
to have occurred this morning at
tanet was felt in Indianapolis
Crawfordsville, thirty-five miles
Fontanet, the shock cracked a brick
wall and sank tiling in a floor
inch.
of
for.
were
500
sides
ware
some
All telephone connection with
tanet is lost and parties have
Terr*. Houte and Brazil in automo
blle: IjjjjjJearn the details.
It is reported, but -Hot conhrmod,
that twenty-flve people wert klljpd.
; ' ® sl-ght
• enrtb
%, at s»:
•n Sout.lwvii ln
n p
' Oct
n»,
quake, was
o'clock this morning,
diana several points . eported a shock
and it was also report >1 from Hamil
ton, O.
h<
a
GRANTED A PARDON-.
Jackson, Miss., October 15.—The
Governor has pardoned Samuel
Thomas, a white convict, sent up for
life at the May term of court from
Tallahatchie County in 1904 for
der. His application for pardon
strongly Indorsed and has been pend
ing for some time.
to
mur
POLICE CHIEF ACQUITTED.
Daily News Special.
Gulfport, Miss., October 15.—Judge
Kelley gave his decision In the case of
Chief of Police Duckworth, discharg
ing the defendant, who was charged
with neglect of duty, on account of in
sufficient evidence to convict.
c
n
❖ ❖ ❖ <•
❖ MISSOURI YOUTH


SHOT HIS MOTHER. ❖

*
❖ Associated Press.
❖ Kansas City, Mo., October 15.— ❖
❖ George Smiley, aged 17, shot ❖
❖ and killed his mother, Mrs. Liz- ❖
❖ zie Scholfer, aged 42, in their ❖
❖ home at 3:30 o'clock this morn- ❖
•> ing. In a statement to the off!- ❖
❖ cers Smiley says he shot his O
❖ mother in defending her against <*
❖ a burglar. He is being held for ❖
❖ investigation.

of
•>
floo j
RAGING TORRENT
SWEEPS EVERYTHING
FIVE DROWNED AND THIRTY
THOUSAND HOMELESS.
Great Distress Among the People.
The Relentless Waters Have
Washed Countless Coffins from the
Cemetery at Manresa.
Associated Press.
Barcelonia, October 15.—The
situation in this vicinity is most se
rious. Up to the present time five
persons have been drowned and 30,
000 thrown out of work. The great
est distress is reported from Manresa,
{b ■ '
ISSJsHS*.
^Tillage I
«
out countless
cem
.
ot 'st
of the Society of Jesus.
has been
terribly rava
waters have w'ashed
coffins and bodies from the local
etery.
The Gaudalmedina River is out of
its banks and in this district several
old people and children have been
drowned.
FRANCIS JOSEPH'S
CONDITION CRITICAL
Vienna, October 15.—According to
information
the most trustworthty
the condition of Emperor Francis Jo
seph shows no improvement. The em
peror refuses to admit his illness and
today asked to be allowed physical
exercise.
NEGRO BISHOPS
MAY BE APPOINTED
sel
for
Associated Press.
Richmond, Va„ October 15.—Toe
question of appointing negro bishops
was brought up before the general con
vention of the Episcopal Church to
day. The majority and minority re
ports were read and discussed. The
majority reports provides that the
bishop be allowed to establish dioceses
for certain races. It is provided that
in the case of a diocese the regal jur
isdiction in the diocese shall at first
be adopted by the bishop and the
convention of that diocese. The mi
nority report provides for the appoint
ment of negroes to preside over ne
groes and to have seats in the house
of deputies. Neither report has thus
far been adopted.
ORGANIZER ARRIVES
TO PROMOTE Y. M. C. A.
Mr. C. H. Moorman, of Birmingham,
Ala., and who is one of the best known
men associated with the Young Men's
Christian Association, accompanied
by the association organizer, arrived
in Hattiesburg yesterday forenoon.
They are guests of the people of the
city and are registered at Hotel Hat
tiesburg.
The gentlei
V«re for the pur
ie
Uat
ELKS HOME
IS ASSURED
Nearly $2,000 Subscribed Last Night
and the Building Committee
is Enthusiastic.
<•

ADDITIONAL SUBSCRIPTIONS
WILL BE EASILY SECURED

*






O
<*


Site Will Be Selected at an Early
Date and Work on the New Struc
ture Will Begin as Soon as the
Funds Can Be Raised.
•>
At a meeting of Hattiesburg Lodge
D. P. O. E., held at the lodge rooms
in the Smith building last night, def
inite steps were taken to raise funds
for the erection of a handsome new
home. Nearly $2,000 of the stock was
subscribed, despite the fact that a
great many of the strongest members
of the lodge were absent. These will
be seen as early as possible by the
building committee and the amount
will doubtless be increased several
times over before the end of the
week.
The building committee is com
posed of Messrs. B. McClanahan, J. L. .
Kearney and M. J. Epley, and these
gentlemen are also looking for a de
sirable site on which to erect the new
home. It must be close in and a cor
ner lot is preferred, as the new
building is to be one of the handsom
est In the city.
j , The B. P. O. E. is one of the strong
est fraternal orders in the country,
aflB there is not a more representa
tive lodge anywhere than Uie one at
Haitiesburg.. '
Plans for the new bu
■ '
<•»"-,, -
I of th , e
u,Pn,ly 1
not as vet been drawn, and tk
T ^.''Oposed structure hr
Tjkter of sp«rWit|H
a mat*Jp the amoun^H
Thi '? .-.-uds c«3old and th -H
which can be :\i will be^a-^B
the site.
Hattiesburg, ho a
saying, as Hattiesburg Elks never do
things otherwise.
That l«rer^
s without
Messrs. McClanahan. Kearney and
Epley will get busy and they will stay
busy until the necessary funds
forthcoming. If you are a member of
the lodge you had as
across."
are
well "come
BIG DAMAGE SUIT
IS NOW ON TRIAL
IN HINDS COUNTY
Daily News Special.
Jackson. Miss., October 15—The
session of circuit court today has been
taken up with the argument of
sel in the damage suit of P. P. Cal
houn against the Alabama and Vicks
burg Railway and the Jackson Elec-,
trie Railway, Light and Power Com
pany, being a joint suit for $10,000
for injuries to his son, W. P. Calhoun,
which resulted in his death about a
year ago. The testimony in the case
was completed yesterday, the Instruc
tions prepared last night and sub
mitted to the Jury with the argument,
which closed jfist before the noon ad
journment.
C<) m
A NEW BALLOON.
Paris, October 15 —Eclair today de
clares that M. Capezza has in>-ented a Tjj
combiriatton aeroplane and dirigible |
balloon capable of carrying five
sengers in addition to 20,000 pounds
and stay aloft fifteen hours.
. : t -
mapped out during Mr. Moorman's
last visit to Hattiesburg, about thirty
days ago Mr. Moorman will be in
the city only a short time, but the „
ganlzer will remain here until all
arrangements are completed and the
building is an assured fact.
Both gentlemen are sanguine df
success and all that is needed, they
state. Ib the substantial cooperation
and financial assistance of the inhab
itants of the city. ,
or-

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