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Hattiesburg daily progress. (Hattiesburg, Miss.) 18??-1909, November 28, 1902, Image 1

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Hattiesburg Daily Progress
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VOL. IV.
Hattiesburg, Miss., Friday, November 28,1902
No. 1
ROOSEVELT
BARS HANNA
In His Political Machine
—No Room For Mark
6REAT NATIONAL CHAIRMAN.
He Managed Two Victorious Cam
paigns, But Must Now
STEP ASIDE FOR A MAN OF
Roosevelt's Choosing—Hanna's
Turn Will Come.
Atlanta, Nov. 26.—The Constitu
tion has this from Wasshington:
While the recognition of the Ad
dicts faction in Delaware by Presi
dent Roosevelt was a great surprise to
the public at large, it was not a
surprise to those who have kept an
eye on the machine-building which
has been going on in Washington,
The frame work of the Roosevelt
machine is now practically complete.
It won't be adjusted entirely until
*€h« president has received his nomina
tion a year and six months hence, but
it is sufficiently in place to give a
fairly good idea of its proportions and
of its individual parts.
One fact stands out plainly. There
| is no place in the Roosevelt machine
for Mark Hauua who kept a tight
I rein on the republican organization
while McKinley was president.
Mr. Hanna will have to step aside
for some one to be designated by Mr.
Roosevelt.
Payne, at present vice chairman of
the republican national organization,
! and James S. Clarkson, formerly of
Iowna, but now collector of the port
| of New York, are the leading wssi
bilities for Mr. Hanna's job.
Both are political manipulators,
whose shrewdness has been their chief
recommendation. The selection of a
national chairman comes after the
nominattiou. and while it is possible
for many changes to take place in the
■- time that must elapse, it is even now
a choice of Payne or Clarkson.
Senator Hanna regards with calm
I indifference liis passing as a political
manager. The Hanna machine victo
rious in two presidential campaigns,
now exists in name only. Mr. Hanna
I might have asserted himself, held his
power, and control even to the extent
of preventing Mr. Roosevelt's nomi
■ nation. The fact that he did not do
so did much toward the disintegration
of liis machine.
Wherever the Hanna machine lost,
I the Roosevelt machine gained. Be
sides the last election helped Rouse
I velt immeasurably.
himself so much of an issue that the
Postmaster General
He had made j
... , .. ,. ,,
rough rider. The election discouraged |
the men who have been discounting
Mr. Roosevelt and in the same propor
result could not well be regarded any
thing but an endorsement of the s
IB
The Volcano Mt. Pelee
1
Again m Eruption
Do not fail to
and see the Volcano Mt Pelee in eruption, destroying the city of
St Pierro, Created over by Electricity
nov25 W k
FURNITURE
For Latest Designs, Choice Assortment Satisfactory
Prices, Cash or Credit,
9
— GO TO
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S. L. HEIDELBERG,
-
Miss.
Main st. Hattiesburg,
532
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tion it swelled the ranks of the presi
dent's followers.
THE BOSS KICKS BACK.
The managing editor of our other
paper, the Vicksburg American, re
cently referred to the inferior quality
of the majority of newspapers in Mis
sissippi. He seems to forget that it's
much easier for a man to run a good
newspaper on some other man's money
than it is on his own. From our way
of thinking the papers in Mississippi
are far superior to those in towns of
equal size in other states, especially
when it is considered that half of the
population in our towns are negroes
who do not read. With very few ex
ceptions every paper in Mississippi
does credit to the town in which it
is published. The American is infe
rior to many other southern dailies,
but it is just as good as the condi
tions will permit, and as the condi
tions improve so will the American.
It takes a very liberal patronage to
make a good newspaper, and a man
who undertakes to do $2 jobs for fl
with the expectation of getting rich
might well be put down as having
exceedingly poor business judgment.
What the papers in Mississippi need
to make them better is better patron
age and prompt cash settlements fqr
the service rendered. Freo tickets to
church festivals, theatres, etc., and
stale wedding cake will not pay the
printers or a bill for paper.—Colum
bus Commercial.
THE CITY'S OFFICIALS
As Declared Nominated by the
Primaries Recently Held.
We the undersigned Democratic
Executive Committee of the city of
Hattiesburg certify that the follow
ing candidates were nominated at the
democratic municipal primary elec
tions held for said city on the 18th
and 25tli of November, 1902. :
For Mayor—C. W. Rich.
For Marshal—B. M. Moffett.
For Treasurer—E. B. George.
For Clerk—A. Fairley.
Alderman-at-Large—John W. Mon
tague.
Aldermen, Ward 1.-—S. C. Eaton
and W. A. McLeod.
Aldermen, Ward 2.—H. C. Greer
and T. J. George.
Aldermen, Ward H.—O. j. Bowen
and M. Dunn.
Aldermen, Ward 4.—T. M. Fuller
and Dan Fairley.
Witness our signatures, this the
28th day of November, 1902.
W. M. CONNER,
G. I. WAIN WRIGHT,
A. T. POWE,
M. L. THOMPSON.
LINCOLN'S PORTRAIT
Will Be Placed in the Mississippi
Hall of Fame.
Special to the Daily Progress.
Jackson, Nov. 28.—The portrait
of President Linoclnwill be placed in
the Missisisppi hall of fame. The
picture is furnished by his son, Rob
ert Lincoln, of Chicago in response to
a request of the state and will be
j placed alongside of Robert E. Lee.
Plenty Coal.
The Hattieshnrg Ice Co desires to in
| fQTW the pnblic thHt it ba9 plenty of
coa i f or Pa i e an d can deliver on vary
short notice.
s
Phone 2^. nov21-lwk
TH PRESIDENT
AND LEADERS
Of Republican Party
Held a Conference
TO DISCUSS TRUST MATTERS
The Anti-Trust Legislation to Be
Pushed Steadily,
BIT VERY CONSERVATIVELY, UNTIL
Something is Done Either at This
or a Called Session.
Washington, D. C., Nov. 27.—As a
most magnificent result of the confer
ences between President Roosevelt and
the republican party leaders in con
gress, there has come a general under
standing that anti-trust legislation is
to be pushed steadily but conserva
tively from the opening of congress
until something is done.
The president did not say so, but
all of his advisers came away with
the idea that he had set his heart
upon some kind of trust legislation,
and they were led to believe that if
nothing was accomplished at the pres
ent short session he would be more
than likely to call an extra session
early in the spring.
No general conference was held at
the white house yesterday afternoon,
but the president had a series of indi
vidual talks with Senators Allison,
Cullom and Fairbanks, Speaker Hen
derson, prospective Speaker Cannon,
and several well known members of
the house and senate.
A majority of those who called ex
pressed the opinion that, while it is
in the range of possibilities for con
gress to enact some trust- legislation at
the chances are
the present session,
that nothing will be done in this
experience has
direction because
shown that no bills effecting grave
interests are ever pressd at the short
session in the face of opposition, and
it is well known that there is plenty
of opposition to any action against
the trusts.
Naturally the president would not
declare his intentions as to an extra
session at such an early day, but it
evident that he will not hesi
seems
tate to^all congress together soon
after March 4, if the indications point
toward the passage of some such bill
as he is enthusiastically urging.
A Startling Surprise.
Very few could believe in lookiDg at
A. T. Hoadley, a healthy, robust black
smith of Tilden, Ind., that for ten years
he suffered such tortures from Rheu
matism as few coull endure and live
But a wonderful change followed his
taking Electric Bitters. "Two bottles
wholly cured me," he writes, "and I
have not felt a twinge in ovei a year."
They regulate the Kidneys^ purify the
blood and cure Rheumatism, Neural
gia, Nervousness, improve digestion
and give perfect health. Try them
Only 50c at Tucker & Greeks drug
store.
IB
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"If you want to know what smartly dress d men will wear
this season, ask to see Steln-Bloch Smart Clothe*.

You'd be Surprised
TF you took the trouble
■ to inquire how many
of your best dressed
acquaintances are not
having their clothes
made=to-measure at
all, but are wearing
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« *Y
A Rain Coat Is Now
in Season.
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A
HE REASON is plain to every
one familiar with their un
matchable excellence. No
custom tailor can do more
for you than we can with
STEIN - BLOCH SMART
CLOTHES- No matter if
your figure is a little "off*"
we'll fit you just as well as
any tailor can, but our argu
ments here alone will not
convince you—come and see
the clothes and try them on;
you'll never have your
clothes made-to-measure
again.
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Stein=Bloch Smart Suits and
Overcoats $15.00 and upwards.
.
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UR FURNITURE DEPARTMENT will be
complete with new goods in a few days—
Bedroom Suits, Fancy Parlor Chairs and Leather Upholstered Library Suits.
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BigDepartmen tS tore.
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Notice to Subscribers.
Hereafter the Progress will not be
sent to any subscriber whose subeerp*
tion time has expired. If he receive* it
through the mail he will know when
his subscription has expired by the
mailing label on his paper, bi tbis
ecriber .tthon. h-tber .ottota.
•Totmstoo'a harsaparlUa never falls,
Stood the test for 30 years; Quart Bottle*"

'
Notice to^Advertisers.^
To be successful in any business
. , , _.__ .
business principle* and roles most be
adopted and adhered to. Therefore-the
progress has adopted a business system
and rn i eg governing the advertising
*a*. *»*•«•
*" 0 "
printed in plain type and so arranged
[ that any one can understand them.
a.;
r
These rates can v e s en at the < ffice 1 y
a-y one applying for space in the paper.
These rates will be adhered to strictly,
thus treating all alike. These rates
apply to display advertisements only.
The rates for locals published along
with pure reading matter, are higher,
being five cents per line for each inser
tion. Locals co ne higher because they
occupy better positions and fives the
advertiser better reaolta. ✓ -•
A TRAIN
PLUNGES
Down an Embankment
On the Big Four
AND A FRIGHTFUL ACCIDENT
Is the Result
St. Louis Flyer
Ditched by a Broken Rail
AND ENTIRE TRAIN IT IS REPORTED
Ran Into a Corn Field, Killing
/Many People.
Indianapolis, Noy. 28.— The. St.
Louis flyer on the Big Four, which
left Indianapolis this morning at
12:05, is reported to be a total wreck.
At 1:80 o'clock this morning the
train struck a broken rail, one-half
mile west of Avon and live and one
half miles west of here. At this point
the road runs along a high fill. The
entire train, it is reported, plunged
down the fill and is now in a corn
field, a pile of ruins.
A message was received here from
Danville at 2:20 o'clock this morning
asking for all possible medical aid,
and eight or ten physicians where
summoned. They, with superinten
dent Van Wiuklq, .of the Big Four,
left for the scene on a special train at
3 o'clock.
A telephone message from Danville
at 2:40 o'clock stated that all availa
ble physicians from here had been
called to the wreck, and no word had
been received further than that the en
tire train was in a corn field at the
bottom of a steep embankment, and
there was no doubt a great many were
injured. It was not know there were
any dead or how many were injured.
In railroad circles at Danville the
belief was general that the loss of life
must necessarily be heavy.
The wrecked train left the union
station in this city for St. Louis at
12:05 o'clock this morning. It con
sisted of one sleeping car from Cleve
land which came in over the Big
Four at about the same hour, another
sleeper from. Cleveland which arrived
earlier in the night, four cars from
Cincinnati, two of which were com
bination cars. The train was almost
filled with passengers when it left
hore. The first word of the wreck
were received here from the trainmas
The Briglitwood
ter at Mattoon, 111.
wrecking train was ordered out and
two special cars were made up to fol
low.
These special cars contained
Superintendent Van Winkle, Of the
Big Four, and eight or ten physicians.
General Superintendent Van Winkle
said as soon as he reached the union
station:
"It looks pretty bad to me. There
must be a good many hurt or they
would not want so many physicians.
At 3 o'clock, as Superintendent Van
Winkle was boarding the tarin to
leave forv Avon, he received this mes

sage from Danville:
"Four
Send
sleepers derailed,
three sleepers to transfer passengers.
Superintendent Van Winkle said
he thought from this the wreck was
not so bad as he feared at first.
9 f
At
3:40 the wrecking train arrived from
Briglitwood and immediately left for
the scene of the wreck.
General aorgeon Ford of the Big
Fonr with a corps of physicians, were
on the train.
Plantation Sold.
Nov. 26.—The
Vicksburg, Miss.,
Beer Garden plantation in Washing
ton county has been sold to W. L.
Hay of Inland, the price being $35,
010 cash.
Negro Thief Caught.
West Point, Miss., Nov. 26.—Will
Coleman, a negro porter in the
Hotel Holt, was arrested for stealing
money from the office safe. He con
fessed and also told the officers of a
blind tiger run by Ben Paden. The
latter was arrested and fined $60 and
given six months In jail.
Startling, But True.
If every one knew what a grand
medicine Dr. King s New Life Pills is,"
writes D. H. Turner, Dempseytown,
Pa., "yon'd sell all you have in a day.
Two weeks use has made a new man of
me." Infallible for constipation,
stomach and liver troubles. 25c at
Tncker & Greer's store.
i$
You never can ten wnax • \ oman wUI da
«ext."
I can."
"Well, what?"
Talk." f
• That's it-A woman ;
.riends of the wonderful
«on's Sarsaparilla, and the proprietors
thank thousands of good noble worn*# m this
country for having mad* JOhneto^* SARSAPA>
HiA X.A [quart bottles > fatnona."
will talk and tell her
vt te
*

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