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The Hattiesburg news. (Hattiesburg, Miss.) 1908-1917, August 10, 1911, Image 1

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THE HATTIESBURG NEWS
I
EL XV—No 183
Member o( Associated Press
OAILY SEWS. Knsbllibed 190
DAILY PROGRESS. Established 1896
HATTIESBURG. MISSISSIPPI. THURSDAY AFTERNOON. AUGUST 10.1911.
1
Consotidaiec
April 6. 1900
Æ
IL STATE
PAY INTEREST
ON THE BONOS?
î»
mob
was
that
V NOT BOUND TO DO SO LEGALLY
BUT NOEL SAYS "DEBT
OF HONOR."
>
on
are
TREASURER EDWARDS OPPOSES IT
* Promises To Be One of the Liveliest
Fights of the Approaching Legisla
lure—Extra Session of the Present
» iBt/'Slature May Be Called.
-
pot
j
I up
' Special to The News.
Jackson, Miss., Aug. 10. One of the ;
liveliest lights of the approaching leg- !
islature will be over the ques
tion of reimbursing purchasers
-» of the recent $600,000 state bond is- j
•sue for the amount of interest cou- !
lions front
July 1 to December 31, j
1910, inclusive, the total sum involved |
\ «being $10,500.
. ' In his biennial message to the leg
islature Governor Noel will urge that
an appropriation be made for this j
purpose, believing that the state's fi- j
nancial integrity is deeply Involved, j
and that the commonwealth will be j
guilty of an act of repudiation unless
the allowance is made.
On the other hand, ätate Treasurer j
^ Edwards, witn wtiorn Gov I ,j.
vP'M .Noel has been involved in a 1
fedu in this question for several
months, declares that he intends to!.;.
*.£iglit it to a finish, and will go before j,;.
(he legislative committees in person
ami urge that no appropriation be |...
v
"I do not believe that the bond pur
chasers are entitled to this interest, 1
either on legal or moral grounds, and I...
mad»-.
( am going to do everything in my i
power to prevent the payment." said ,
. Mr. Edwards last night.
"The courts of our state have held :
\ that it would not have been legal to
pay this interest, and, since the facts
that the interest
(onclusively show
vas not earned
by the purchasers.
* there is no question of moral respon
sibility Involved that the legislature
a 1 -n recognize. If a donation of $16.*
is to be made to these bondhold !
ontd he just as fair to make
similar donation to some individual
A,
claim whatever on tho 1
It
who lias n
state.''
î Governor Noel, howev
hr iSat way.
/Ntheininrnl duty
>•' b„,'( the full amount of interest on
1 the $«i>6,000 bond issue for the semi i
annual period, despite the fact that a ,
-(«good portion of the issue was not
marketed until the latter part of the ,
year: that It was possible to market
the bonds onlv because the interest j
for the first semi-annual per
tod w ere attached, and the parties j
lod were believing !
who pure a th , g Intere st, !
that t ey w n0( have mad( , :
otherwise .
Î ome To^he rescue or me state
not come treasury deflei: I
dt th 'd inevitable it would have been
.rqemed g|slatnrP
thus incurring an ex
of j
ihojof
contention of Treasurer Edwards that
. s .,i, 0 f the bonds at par with ar
' ..„„„ons attached In
e below par.
Mis
ion! bankers :md financiers, how
- : thv I Ml. ..is had not been
fV '• \bese m»- «* »•»»>< have
sell them at all.
,„Id have been forced
lor the sel
flnanrtal qnandry.
„ n f ,be
' COtl T'VrC«« ^ 't»te>,,.
virtual,v emptv and It
W tmnosslhle to get
,slashed If funds had
Vtate WM/Ifints cash 1 e _
adt beeih îe,ve <' ' ' . d p
re t lernt I ^^"he leg
In the matter when it r ■ rnrrpnt
'islature. and a report
■>
"' Pr ° ' S " 'nnvene the present legis
NoP ! may c pssi0 n before the
„ |n spec - een erally be
of the year. It I« « '
that the incoming U ■
(Continued on Pas« ***•)
1
, can't see
He believes that it I« |
of the stale to reim
;
'coupons
ti
»rial session.
» far greater than the amount
fi!
pern*
interest involved
sustained
irt
c<
Tin* supreme
evued interest
ronstitu'ed a sal
admitted among
reality
generali:
1; is
sold Jtn
■ been
D
Impossible to
^ «ànd Gov. Noel w
I to convene
Hemmt
I While m
I Ponds "
the legislature
the
of
.-eve
would
lab"'*'
. Hose
lleved
London Docfe Under Mob
Rule-Troops Called Out
—jL_
(By Associated Press.)
London, Aug. 10.—London's dock
neighborhood is practically under
mob rule, with the result that there
was such a dwindling of food supplies
that much suffering followed. Unless
progress is made today In negotla
tions for the settlement of strikers
on the dock work, the calling of
troops seems inevitable as the police
are unable to deal with the emer
gency.
Fish porters at Billingsgate
and returned to
On the other hand hun-1
pot their demands
work today.
dreds of railroad car men quit this
stations were
morning and several
practically In a state of siege, strike
pickets preventing all attempts to
j handle goods.
The strikers declare they will tie
I up all street traffic unless their de
; mauds are conceded within a few
! hours.
London would he perilously near a fa
conditions.
Should they be successful
j
!
police who have
been unable to control the rioting
Latest Report.
London, Aug. 10.—(1 P. M.)—De
j tachments of troops arrived here to
| dav to assist the
Committee Will Not Send
George W. Perkins to Jail
,j.

jWashington, D. C., Aug. 10.— ❖
George W. Perkins, director of •>
j,;. the United States Steel Corpo- ♦
* ra tion, testifying before the *
|... house steel trust investigating ❖ j
the •> ,
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦

•> committee today, stirred
,,, g p ec t a tors when he jumped to ❖ J
... )l)s an( j branded as false a ❖ J
I... phal .g e that the panic of 1907 ❖
had been started by the ruin of ❖
certain banks. Representative ❖
Bartlett of Georgia had asked ❖
•>;
the cafle
^
Perkins whether such was •>
u
Mr.

> <• •> •> •>
10.—George W
, VrklnBi director of the United States |
y Corporation and former partner,
! {
Aug.
Washington,
& Co., was î
the bar of the ;
Fierpont Morgan
ordered before
e committee of inquiry into the <
1 tTnirs of the steel corporation. Nei- j
n J.
ml
lions
i ^
, regardjng contributions
t0 campaign funds, the commit
,
j "■
At the outset the committee in ex
j eoutive session was induced by Rep
! resentative Littlejohn to reconsider
! the action of yesterday, in which the (
: chair was sustained in ordering that j
the witness answer questions as to ,
his persona, campaign contribution, j
I After this was done, a plan was ,
agreed upon as to Just what questions ,
should he asked, and it was under
stood that Richard Llndabnry. coun
j sei for the Steel Corporation, would
declare he knew of one contribution
ihojof $1o.non made by that corporation
to a campaign fund In 1964. This h* ,
afterward stated lefoie e ™ mn1
tee and thereupon the political phase
of the inquiry apparently was dropped
Perkins Summoned.
When the executive session of_ the.
committee was ended. Mr. Perkins
j waR called for by Chairman Stanley.
Representative Littleton, upon
I rivai of Mr. Perkins, began a state
! ment relating how he had been ab
J sent on the previous day. when Mr..
1 Perkins had been asked to what ex
't»te>,,. he had made contributions to
campaign funds after he became ron
i nected with the Steel Corporation.
"Upon the ndmisslhlllty of this evl
dpnoe ." said Mr. TJttlejohn. "a
w as taken, and it was held to be legal
i to ask such questions. T have exam
[ ine d thoroughly the resolution of the
under which this committee
— «-•
j made up
to any witness as
campaign contributions Is not admis-,
| y th|g reBO l u tion. unless It
ill he be.
heated executive session of j
vas j
1 tlier
|
Al'ter
committee today, in which
refusal on advice of j
; the
,discussed
the
sei on Mr. Perkins' part to an
ggestive line of questions
of eorpora
reached an understanding where
by ail threats were waived.
tee
I
vote
and consideration. I have
my mind that any question
to his personal
russlon
strikers. A fusllade of brickbats and
stones met the soldiers but they fin
! ally assisted the police in effecting a
! clearance of the provisions and other
! goods at the central railway station,
; A baton charge was required to move
! each load of goods,
1
I
i
j
NEW ECUADOR PRESIDENT.
Guayaquil. Ecuador. Aug. 10.—Emile
j Estrada, who was last January elected
president of the republic of Ecuador
to succeed Gen. Floy. Alfaro, was form
> ally inaugurated today amid scenes of
! general rejoicing.
DIES IN HIS BUGGY.
! Barnett, aged 63, a farmer of the Six
teenth District of Madison county,
dropped dead in Humboldt yesterday
while seated in the buggy with his
son, Jack Barnett.
Humboldt, Tenn., August 10.—Steve
;
FALLS FROM BOAT.
Louisville, Ky., August 10.—At Har
lan, Ky., Liddle Harris, 15 years old,
I was drowned In the Cumberland river
| when she fell from a boat.
I
relating to the difference in the meth
od of keeping records between the
can be shown that such contributions
were made with the understanding
that thereafter the contributor was
to be reimbursed by the Steel Cor
poration.
"As to the question put yesterday
United States 8teel corporation and!
the New York Life Insurance Com-|
pany, that matter Is still pending, j
Representative Beall, under direction q
of the committee, will continue to in
terrogate the witness, and I wish it
nderstood that I will meet future
questions as they come to me.
u
GENERAL RELIEF
|
FROM THE HEAT
î
;
<
j Mobile
the South
Hottest Town i
Today—One Fatality In
( at
j gl|lting f ,. om prostration wa B reported
, veste rday at Chattanooga.
j
,
,
MiBs Aug in ._ R . j. Bud
, of pla( . e has brought
su1 , in the Circuit court against the
, 8land railroad, the Gulf
gh)pplng Company and j. W . Cor
Co ^ damageg the sum of
thn t the defendants
» ' ' e , o creftt „ a monopo .
)y Mr . Buddendorff . formerly of New
Orleans, is In the brokerage business.
,
It «We •
j
j
Chattanooga.
j
(By Associated Press.)
Atlanta, Ga., Aug. 10.—Relief from
the excessive heat of yesterday Is re
ported generally through the South.
Mobile, with ninety-one degrees, was
Charleston, with
the hottest and
eighty-two, was coolest city reporting
One fatality re
1 o'clock today.
.
M0N0°01Y AU FM TO
EXIST AT GULFPORT
I
It is represented by the plaintiff that
his efforts to carry on business have
been prevented by the defendants, the
railroads refusing to give him rates or
handle his shipments, while the
shipping company, which he claims in
1 reality is the railroad concern, referr
ed him to the Corry people when he
applied for rates, and that the latter
informed hint that they had the ex
clusive right to the pier for the hand
ling of articles of merchandise
brokers, and that they could not af
ford to give him, as a competitor, the
benefits of the privileges.
It Is alleged that the monopoly ex
ists In all lines save lumber and naval
to
MS
t
TAFT TREATIES
>0 &E AMENDED
BY THE SENATE
WILL PASS WHEN AMENDED
They Have no Chance to Go Through
UPPER HOUSE SAYS TOO MUCH
POWER IS GIVEN TO THE
JOINT COMMISSION.
in Present Form and President Will
Have to Compromise—Sen. Clarke
Suggests Postponement.
j
Washington, Aug. 10—Friends of the i
British and French arbitration treat- |
tes in the senate have reached the j
conclusion that it will be necessary to [
amend the conventions in order to ]
get favorable action upon them. Thisjture
conclusion is the result of the con- |
sidération of the documents by the
senate committee on foreign rela
tions, which has taken them up in
(By Associated Press.)
vigorous fashion.
After two prolonged sittings the
committee adjourned late yesterday J
to meet again Saturday. Both meet- j
ings were devoted to the considéra j
tion of the documents on their mer- !
its, the first in company with Secre- j
tary Knox and the second by the j
members themselves without the sec
retary's aid.
No effort was made to have the
treaties reported and it became ex
tremely doubtful to some of the
friends of the administration whether
such a course would be wise at the
present time, owing to objections to
some features of the agreements as
they now appear. j
special objection was made at both ,
j sittings to the provisions submitting |
q , leB tlons of difference (o the Joint j
high comm t ssi on of Inquiry but fault j
also wag found wlth the provisions In
the Prenoh treaty , Authorising ratifl-|
cation by that government in accord- !
ance with the proceeding required hv j
the laws of France, and with the con
ditlon in the British treaty that mat- !
ters affecting dependencies of Great
Britain shall he submitted to the gov
ernments of such dependencies.
j
!
thought the latter clause
might lead to undesirable complica
tions. while it was feared the former
might necessitate a change
method of proceeding in this country, j
Despite all these objections it be- 1
evident however, that the pow
er conferred upon the joint commis- 1
Sion is the only real obstacle to early '
expressed
It was
In the
.
came
action. Several senators
opposition to this provision and more
tlmn one suggestion was made that I
tlm paragraph should be eliminated
least materially modified. No
made to this effect, hut j
vote it probably I
or at
motion was
if there had been a
would have carried. The magnitude j
of the extent of this criticism will ;
atten
the
be brought to the president's
tion and some senators will urge
ncellatlon of the provision.
At the afternoon session a eugges
tion of the morning meeting that the
hole question should he postponed
, *■ qhnne of a
motion to that effect. '
Senator Clarke of Arkansas, hut
general ex
Tn this con
. -î
w
hv
•ithdrawn upon a
pression of opposition
ection the friends of the treaties
received the greatest encouragement
that was given them during the day.
Many members of the committee
vas
I
friendly to
expressed themselves as
general proposilion Involved In
the
the treaties and some went so far as
few changes it
to say that with a
might he possible to get favorable a<
Hon during the present session,
pectaliv If It should he prolonged to
any extent.
es
wrth
IMPROVEMENT CLUBS MEET.
Bellingham. Wash , Aug. 10.
,-erai hundred delegates present, the
meeting of the Western Federation of
Improvement Clubs was opened here
today and will continue three days.
The visitors will he elaborately enter
A <1 C « C C 44 4 *
THE WEATHER.
Fair tonight and Friday. *
sev
MS
tained without expense.
6
Ollie James Has a Tilt
With Leader Underwood
(By Associated Press.)
Washington, Aug. 10.—Democratic
harmony in the house was temporar
ily ruffled yesterday when Democratic
I Leader Underwood and Representa
J tive James of Kentucky, who have
j been close friends, became involved
in heated words in the discussion of
j a bill providing for the improvement
I of Black Warrior river in Mr. Under
! wood's district. Both men withdrew
! their remarks and the incident was
i amicably closed.
! The hill provides for the building
of a dam to improve navigation on
The construction of the
dam would create a large amount of
water power, the rights to which, un
der the bill, would be leased for 5"
ths Birmingham (Ala.)
j Light and Power Company. Mr. James
i and others opposing this provision,
| asserting the term of the lease too
j tong.
[ jvir. Underwood declaring he cared
] nothing about the water power fea
Thisjture of the hill, but was much Inter
| ested in the navigation feature, said
that if the bill were held up work on
the Black Warrior would go ahead
as originally contemplated at an ex
.the river.
years to
Collins Speaks to Hudson
and Gets His Jaws Boxed
political opponent, in the Union Sta
number of
Jackson, Miss., Aug. 10.—The ugli- ;
est stage in the attorney generalship
campaign was reached at 2:20 o'clock
when General
yesterday afternoon,
Spence S. Hudson,
slapped the face of Ross Collins, his
of Vicksburg,
j tion in the presence of
, siarl [ ed spectators. The men met by
| ,. hance as e ach were awaiting to |
j i, oard trains t0 go to their homes in ,
j opposHe dire ctions. Collins approach-!
Hudson wlt h hand extended. !
y General „ Co „ tnB aBi „
! ^ hav<? ' ted Hads0 n.
j , . , , , .
Hudson turned hi. back upon his j
! opponent and then wheeled suddenly |
«a riealt Col»"« « «Burning blow on.
"'« left side of the face The force
of the blow with open hand dazed
j Collins, and as he drew himself alert (
! Hudson struck him squarely on the i
niid missed the third blow. ;
j
1 The scuffle attracted C. J. Bolen,
traveling sergeant of the penitentiary,
1 who jumped in between the men just
' as Collins was gathering himself to
gether to ward off another attack,
once
"Fight him. Collins," several men
in an excited group shouted.
General," others declare rhn,
•ere "How do yon do, Gen
Collms was escorted to a far end of
I the depot, and Hudson was taken In,
charge by friends and placed aboard
the train which pulled Into the depot
j Just about the time the trouble
I started.
j
; friends of Collins who were with him
! did not have a chance to interfere,
! Collins had reached the depot several
minutes after Hudson. He stood talk
The assault was so sudden that
ing to Jewell and Fred Collins. Jr.,
; and then walked over towards Hud-1
i *on
• E r o\. assistant attorney general. There
I ttivei t i the words spoken hv Collins
given to the words spoken by Collins,
j but all the witnesses agree that Col-1
! Hus had his r hand extended and was
smiling when he approached Hudson.
of those who were stand-1
understood Collins to sav.
•ho was standing talking to Carl
| ■
\ majority
ling near
"Howdy
vords
1 Is
jeial
The first blow struck by Hudson
: war with his open hand, and the other
wo were with clenched fists
'
j t
One
brazed Collins' jaw. The other
landed fairly but without s,i*
Col
blow
I oient force to knock him down,
lins staggered from the slap, but re
gained himself in a hurry.
'■] merely wanted to show General
! Hudson that 1 had no hard feelings
| in the matter, and was willing to bury
of j the hatchet,'' said Collins. "1 still
l ave no enmity towards him.
I known he was hostile 1 would never
j have apporached him. I was prompt
ed by the kindliest feelings only. The
Incident Is regretted."
* General Hudson remarked in the
4>, presence of bystanders that he did not
* accept the hand of Collins becai.se
In the habit of asaoclatlng with
Had
pense of nearly $250,000 more than
the proposed dam would cost.
■Mr. James asked If It was Intended !
to argue that unless the house passed
the bill, giving a half century lease J
to a corporation without limitation ;
!
of Us charges to consumers certain j
work would be done costing the gov- i
ernment $200,000 more than if the ;
rights were given away.
"My friend from Kentucky." replied
Mr. Underwood, "has just come out
of a successful campaign for senator, j
where a play to the galleries has
brought votes, but I will say to him
that to claim that one company con
trolling one water power is a monop
oly. Is to answer me with the pro
position that 1 am pleading for a mo
nopolv and is not fair to me."
Mr. James responded that he would
have expected "a statement more con- i
siderate of the people of Kentucky.^
among whom the gentleman (Mr. Un- ,
{derwood) was horn." I
Then Mr. Underwood, explaining l
that he mean* no provocation, wtts
drew his remarks. Mr. James With
drew his. too.
I The house adjourned without act
ing on the bill.
; gentlemen and that he did hot regard
Collins in that class.
The campaign between Hudson and
Collins was very bitter, the two can
didates denouncing each other in pub
lic utterances and through the press.
General Hudson was Incensed at a
recent editorial which appeared In a
South Mississippi paper reflecting on
his office in the Hinds Lumber Com
pany litigation.
No arrests were made.
|
, .. , . .. . Thp , v
. ter shown bv Collins
! ,Continued on Page Six )
'Continued on Page Six.)
j
|
(
i
; Standpat
The men
WILL STICK TO
THE PRESIDENT
j
,
j
Republicans Don't Want
Any Measures Passed Over
Mr. Taft's Veto.
(By Associated Press.)
Aug
10. — Standpat
FYPFN^IVF VAT A TiniNI
LAll.lltllVL T HU" ! IUI'
was doing time on the city streets
I fer breaking into a drug store on
Mobile street seme time ago and who
Washington,
, R bI U aII leaders of cougress flock
ed to the White House today to in
form President Taft that they would
fight to the last ditch before they
allowed either the senate or house to
pass any measure over his veto.
"We do not propose to let any at
| tempt at making laws over the presi
I dent's head ge through without a
I fight." said Republican whip John
Dwight. Senator Murray Crane en
dorsed this statement.
j

JIM SMITH TAKES aN
i
j
I
|
Jim Smith, a negro prisoner, who
quit his Job. was captured in Meri
Officer Tom Beverly, learning
Moan,
his whereabouts, had him arrested
and went to Meridian Tuesday to get
the prisoner.
i Smith's little vacation proved an
he was assessed
about thirty-five more days in addl
re- expensive one as
j tion to his unexpired term,
1 -
_
STRANGE-R RUN OVER BY TRAIN,
1
j train yesterday morning ran oxer
1 white man named Young, who is sup
posed to have been a tramp, cutting
off one of his legs, near Evansville.
the He wa 8 seen and picked up by
not . other passing train a little later
he j was being taken to Chattanooga where
| he died.
Dayton, Tenn.. August 10.—An early
T ;
ENDS HIS LAST
GREAT FIGHT
COMMANDER-IN-CHIEF
Distinction Through Civil War—Or.
OF CON
FEDERATE VETERANS IS
DEAD IN MEMPHIS.
SOLDIER, LAWYER AND.STATESMRN
Long Life of Usefulness—Served With
ganized Ku Klux Klan in Tennes
see.
(/;y Associated Press.)
ilemph j s> Xenn Aug io.—George
' '
as 1 ngton Gor on f so itr, lawvei
statesman, Is dead. Worn by an ill
ness dating from his last political
campaign, when he was re-elected to
the national house of representatives,
the last general of the Confederacy
to serve in that body answered the
summons to join the invisible major
iff- Funeral arrangements have not
been announced but the obsequies
will be, it is expected, of a military
character and the body will be laid
to rest in this city probably Sunday.
Weakened by the heat of the past
24 hours and his feeble frame wasted
by the ravages of a slow Illness, the
light of Gen. Gordon's life grew dim
mer hourly today. When, followed by
a restless night he awoke from fltfnl
sleep In the early morning hours, the
loving watchers at his side saw that
the end was but a question of hours,
perhaps minutes. As the end ap
proached, peace seemed to envelope
his face, for he smiled as with com
forting wordF he bade relatives adieu.
He died at 4 o'clock yesterday after
noon.
Af the bed s' de of Gen. Gordon when
he died were his wife and other rela
tives.
Family Moved to Mississippi.
George Washington Gordon was
horn in Giles county, Tenn., Oct. 6,
1836. In his early boyhood his par
lants removed to Texas and later to
Mississippi, but as a youth he re»
turned to Tennessee and entered the
Western Military Academy, from
which he was graduated in 1385. His
activity was as a civil engineer.
1 At the outbreak of the Civil war
. Gordon enlisted as drill master
G<
! of the Eleventh Tennessee Infantry,
Within a few weeks he
! C. S. A.
! was made a captain and later pro
j moted to a lieutenant colonel's rank
. and in about a year was commissioned
! colonel. In 1R64 he was named briga
! dier general.
He participated with
distinction in a number of engage
ments and at one time was taken
prisoner but was exchanged at the
etid of ten days.
At the close of the war Gen. Gor
don studied "nd practiced law, becom
ing attorney general of this (Shelby'
county. In 1883 he was appointed a
member of the Tennessee Railroad
Commission and in 1885 an attache
of the federal department of the Inter
ior. serving four years In the Indian
country. At the end of Grover Cleve
land's first presidential term he re
i turned to Memphis and resumed the
! practice of law. In 1892 he was elect
led superintendent of the Memphis
schoo,s was e,ec,ea a
; member of the fifith congress from
! the Tenth Tennesse district and re
the fiist and 62nd con
the only Confeder
, dp general numbered in the present
! congress
ielected t
1 greases.
He
Gen. Gordon was chosen eomman
d er-in-chief of the United Confederate
I veterans at the reunion of 1910 at
. Mobile. Ala.
I
He was re-elected to that position
a* the 1911 reunion at Little Rock,
Ark., last May.
Gen. Gordon was credited with hav
ing been one of the organizers of the
Ku Klux Klan in Tennessee.
Health Began to Fail.
Immediately following the close of
his last political campaign, Gen. Gor
don's health began to fall. Asthma In
severe form developed Notwithstand
ing the poor state of his health he
attended the sessions of congress and
his vigor was partially restored. Just
before the Little Rock reunion, he suf
fered an attack of ptomaine poison
lug. and against the advice
(Continued I
a
an
tyal-

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