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Times-promoter. (Hernando, DeSoto County, Miss.) 1898-1970, October 29, 1898, Image 3

Image and text provided by Mississippi Department of Archives and History

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87065195/1898-10-29/ed-1/seq-3/

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The Opinions of the French Press are
Not Unanimous in Regard to
France's Position.
C'oi
rels
Mo.,
SALISBURY CALLED UPON TO EXPLAIN.
his
Meanwhile the IfrltI hIi Admiralty In Uuili
b|» Naval i'reparailwurt Forward A
Uwlf-iiozeu Thirty- Kuot Torpedo- Boat
Destroy«?r* Iktiijj (lot lleatly, and hub
sided UuvrsUiveu Necessary Notice.
Paris, Oct. 24.—The
here warmly praise the exposition of
the French side of the Fasnoth
tion presented by the minister of for
eign affairs, M. Delcusse, in the Yel
low book, on the subject issued Sun
day.
tu
newspapers
ques
be
Suatuin the Yellow Book.
The Figaro says: "if the British
government reject France's moderate
and just proposals it can only be bo
cause the government of Great Brit
ain desires, before anything else, the
humiliation of France."
The general tone of the French
press comments is reflected by the
Eclair, which remarks: "An agreement,
regarding Fashoda can be arrived at
provided Great Britain does not per
sist in asking for the immediate recall
of Maj. Marehand. But as to an out
let on the Nile, we have an absolute
right thereto, and will brook no re
fusal."
ed
of
t
Tliene See Tilings In Another Light.
The Siecle. after urging peace, says:
''France would hardly come off better
vur with England than did Spain
in the war with the United States.
France would be better employed in
developing her colonies thaninthwart
ing England."
The Autoerite declares that France
in
ic
ought never to have gone to Fashoda.
adding: ''It was a stupid mistake, and
v England calls
Well, it is
is to get out.
use talking, we shall
have to get out, otherwise there
be war, which would be madness.'
SEEN ON Tin: BRITISH SIDE.
Lord StilisDury Culled Fpon for
plnuatlon.
London, Oct. 24. The afternoon
wspapers here discuss the report of
the French ambassador, Baron I)e
the subject of tin* conver
sation he had with the marquis of
Salisbury, regarding the proposed
French outlet of the Nile, as being the
lending feature of the yellow book
the Fashoda question issued Sunday
by the French government. The con
servative organs scout the idea of the
marquis of Salisbury entertaining the
surrender of tin* Bahr-El-Ghazal val
ley to the French, and the Pall Mall
Gazette, and the Globe suggests that
the ambassador misunderstood the
premier, and call on the latter to make
some explanation.
Compromise Would Satisfy Some.
The liberal and radical papers are
not displeased at the prospect
compromise being arranged, and they
believe that provided Maj. Marchnnd is
called the dispute is susceptible of
an arrangement by which France
five some satisfaction in the Bahr
Ex
Courcel,
f t
"T
re
ill
rota
EMiliaz.nl (listriet.
llritlMli Naval Preparation*.
The British admiralty has issued a
The
number of significant orders,
dock yards at Portsmouth, Devonport
*ach received in
and Chatham have
structions to ])re]>are six 30-knot tor
for commission,
pi do-boat destroyers
so that they
in 24 hours.
viil lie able to ]>ut to sea
Overtime hours have be
isers Eureka
gun on the first- class cr
and Andromeda so
as to hurrv the
Several gunboats in the
tor service,
different dock yards have been ordered
to postpone unnecessary refitting.
Finally, the Cunnrd line and White
Star line have received from the ad
intimation to hold their
*rs in readiness for
miralty an
rubsidized sfea
turning over to the navy officials.
Ordered to Mobilise* »t Halifax.
S., Oct. 24,-—The com
manders of all warships of the British
squadron have re
Halifax. N.
North American
wived orders to mobilize at Halifax.
LAST OF HIS FAMILY.
mil" Turner, u Noted Kentucky
Wild
Moonshiner, the Last of Six Brotli
1 , Shot and Killed.
Oct. 24.—"Wild
Middlcsboro, Ky
Turner, a most noted character
BiB
in the mountains, was shot and killed
by Will Combs Sunday night. Turner
kept 11 moonshine saloon on the state
line between Kentucky and Tennessee,
and had made a fortune.
He had
He is the sixth
Filled several men.
brother killed, and is the last of the
family.
Struck by « Train.
Lcadville, Col., Oct. 24.—While wal li
the tracks of the Denver & liio
tng
Grande railroad on their way home
fiom church, Mrs. Cornelius Shea and
daughter Margaret were struck by a
passenger train and almost instantly
killed.
Flvo Ni-ero KInter, Arrested.
Jack-son, Miss., Oct, 24.-A special
Five negroes
•curred
from Forest., Miss., says:
concerned i
Saturday night and Sunday, resulting
in the killing of one white man and
ten negroes, have been ar *°sted at
liarpersville.
the riot which
National Council of Women.
Omaha, Neb.. Oct. 24.—The National
Council of Women began its executive
and
meeting with a business session
formally opened later with a public
meeting in the First Congregational
church.
OTHERWISE UNNOTICED.! r
Three men were i!
Sunday,
lied in Luke
Ali.mij.;
bile out (I licit
hum mg.
The
veil has been .struck neat
i. Te\., with a turn of 2l> bai
l'll
\ ne
C'oi siei
rels per day.
Willis
I
*, of Audrain county,
Mo., committed suicide by diown § •
himself in Salt creek, near Mexico.
•1
A
A jealous lover in Omaha,Neb.,killed
his sweetheart and himself as they
were about to have their photographs
That
tu ken.
A negro trooper at ('hickamauga,
Tenn., killed a white mail, and a fusi
lude of shots resulted in several being
injured.
The London papers are united in the
opinion that there can be
tions regarding Fashoda prior to the
withdrawal of M a rebuild.
The
vor
the
negotia
•spread-eagling" of privates by
Col. Moore at Cam]) Meade, Pa., is tc
be investigated. The privates prob
ably will be court-martialed.
Mrs. Louis Goldberg was saved from
burning to death at St. Louis by the
efforts of her husband, who extin
the
lic,
31
guished the fire, caused by an explo
sion of gasoline.
The cruiser Maria Teresa is expect
ed to sail from Santiago for the north
next Thursday. The vessel is now
considered in shape to mak
age without accident.
The cruiser Ne
Juan, P. 1L Admiral Schley, the othei
members of the commission and theii
ill return aboard of her to tin
United States this week.
News comes that two more battles
have been fought in Formosa betweer
Japanese troops and native savages
bent upon the extermination
of all Japanese on the island.
'I'he ministers of the Porto Rican
the voy
ark arrived at Sar
clerks
who see
gOVernment have taken the oath of of
fice, which was administered to then,
by Col. Hunter, secretary of the Amer
n evacuation commission.
ic
The French people are said to be fat
more anxious as to what may happen
Paris within the ten days after the
chamber
•ets than over any possible
outcome of the Faslioda dispute.
Geronimo, the famous Apache In
from
dii
chief.
has escaped
guards, it is reported, and is thought
to lu* heading toward New Mexico,
where lie used to live with li is tribe.
of
of
is
of
Washing
News has been received i
ton of tin* la
cruiser Rio de la Plata,
presented to Spain by tlie loyal Span
ish residents in the Argentine repub
eh ing, at Havre, of tin 1
vliicli is to be
lie.
The decision of the French court oi
cassation in the Dreyfus case is ex
pected to be rendered on Thursday,
and all indications point to a decision
in favor of a rehearing for the un
fortunate prisoner on Devil's island.
Admiral Dewey has cabled to the
at Washington, saying
government
that anarchy is prevailing in the Phil
ippine provinces. He has made strong
representations concerning
ing situation.
At Ashpole, N. C.. four i
tempted to assassinate some
and wounded throe. They were chased
the exist
guards
t
accompanied by blood
capt tired. They
by a possec
hounds and
were living at last reports.
Near Forest, Miss., a band of white
vere
ill
citizens chased a mob of GO negroes
to a swamp and killed 11 i
The whites to the number of 300 are
scouring the swain]) for the rest of
the blacks. The killing of a white
deputy was the cause.
Dr. Miller, who attended Herr Bar
isch. tin* surgical assistant at Prof.
Noth nagle'x
a
in
bm-tprioloificiil cstnlilisli
vlio died last Thurs
day from bubunie plague, died Sunday.
The three nurses
nu'iit, in Vienna.
sea
be
dio had developed
lint
symptoms of the disease are si
improved.
the
ad
for
THE APPLE CROP FAILURE.
The Crop of Apples in the l'n11•*«! States
tlie Sum 11 ent. Sine
Have Bee
St >tt istii-.s
1 ompUed.
ige Judd
Chicago, Oct. 24.—The Ora
Farmer says:
The apple crop of the United States
is smaller than it hits been s'
re
ee re
liable statistics have been collected.
The total supply from the isos crop
of the United States is 27 , 700,000 bar
rels, com pa red with something over
40,060,000 last year, and 70,000,000 in
the record-breaking crop of 1896.
failure is widespread, reaching from
the Pacific coast to Maine, and in none
of the states does the output of fruit
approach an average. In the great
apple states of the west, the crop is
almost an absolute failure, although
the situation in Michigan is better
having about two
The
than elsewhere,
thirds of the bumper crop of '96. New
York has only one-fifth of a full crop.
The failure is attributed to the fact
had
the
during' the blooming season
was excessive rainfall, which
that
there
washed out the pollen and prevented
proper fertilization by insects, while
a cold wave added to the injury, and
subsequent moist, humid weather was
very favorable to the develo]
fungous disease. The Ontario crop is
decidedly short. The crop of Europe
is reported below the normal.
li
liio
and
a
■nt of
Board, Except h Boy, Drowned.
London, Oct. 24.- It has just devel
oped that the German bark Satisfac
tion sunk during the recent gales in
the North sea. The captain, his wife
and crew of nine were drowned, being
all on board, except a boy who was
saved.
All
and
at
the Beverly.
The Boston Fruit
Hohflon Reached Boston
Boston, Oct. 24.
Co.'s steamer Beverly arrived at her
dock here 24 hours late, having on
beard Naval Constructor Richmond 1\
Hobson, who is in route to Philadel
phia to participate in the peace jubi
lee.
and
r
I
111
bi>-iUi
I ;
'll.
i
V.
ed
i'ee'c
ieall
The Government Wins Its Case
Against the Railroads of the
Joint Traffic Association.
clearly
The
the
posely
is
cut
ly
tire
•1
A CONTRACT IN RESTRAINT OF TRADE.
That was the Mu In Contention of the li<
eminent In theC*
f, it living Contended
that the Agreement of the Railroads
was a Combination to Prevent Competi
tion Amoug Common Carriers.
Washington, Oct. 24.— The United
States supreme court decided the joint
traffic association railroad ease in fa
vor of the United States, and against
the railroads.
been
the
to
the
A .Runt liuj.-o -Ian i ('a ■«•.
The case is considered one of the
most important that has ever come
from the supreme court, not only to
the railroads, but to the general pub
lic, and because of the vast railroad
properties represented by the Joint
Traffic association. The association
was formed on November 19, 1895, by
31 railways, representing the great
trunk lines and their net work of
branches. The purpose of the associa
tion, as stated in the articles of agree
ment, was "to establish and maintain
reasonable and just,
regulations on state and interstate
traffic."
A similar association, on a smaller
scale, was formed among southwest
ern roads, known as the Transmis
souri association.
Alleged Violation of the Anti-Trust Law.
associations were soon at
tacked in the courts on the ground
violation of the
Sherman anti-trust law, and also of
the interstate commerce law. The
transmissouri first reached the United
States supreme court, where, in a no
table opinion, the court held that the
association was illegal, being in ef
fect a combination in restraint of
trade and commerce, and therefore
violative of the anti-trust law. This
have
that
ing
and
the
to
and
•atos, fares and
firm
from
These
Hat they were in
to
ban
over
ns by si divided bench, the
opinion
division being
viz: Chief
TV C
Just ice Fuller a
I Justices Harlan.
Brcker, Brown and IVckani holding
the traffic :
Justices Field. Gray, Sliiras and White
filed a dissenting opinion upholding
the association. Soon after this de
cision Justice Field gave place to Jus
tice McKenna.
Tim Content a Stubborn
Although the Missouri case
sidcred somewhat of a
Join Traffic association
make a stubborn contest in support
its existence. The case against it w
begun on .li
ed States circuit court for the south
ern district of Nt
Suites being the complainant and tin
attorney general directi
The case
ii. the lower courts, tin* ci
isoeiation ilie
hi lo
1
oi
the
test. ye1
of
to
prepare
dn
iary T, 1S9(», i
1 he Cnit
v York, the Cnited
cut against the gov<
i is missing tin* bill, and the
The
the Cnited
appeals affirming the <1 is
*rnment appealed to
Slates supreme court. A 11 exceptionally
f counsel appeared tot
Ihe association and the several
brilliant array
roads, including ex-Seuator Edmunds.
James C. Carter and E. d. Phelps.
TI»o (iovi'rmucnt'H C.' 1
Solicitor-General Richards filed the
brief for the government. The main
contention of the government
traffic agreement is a combination to
prevent competition, thus comditiitir.g
restraint of trade or
commerce. The answer of the associa
tion maintained 1 1n* legality of Ilie
ent, on the ground that the
vast needs of commerce require joint
action, and that such action insures
uniform and just rail's and prevents
gterct and unjust discriminations.
•Jl)Mt.t<'»*H DiKHlUltCil.
The opinion, which was very brief,
was announced by Justice
and was concurred in by Chief Justice
Fi ller and Justices Ilarla
Brown and Peekham. Three justices
dissented, namely. Justices
Sliiras and White,
took no part in the ease.
or.
of
as that
lint
ekham.

li
Justice McKenna
re
in
is
THE PEACE COMMISSIONERS.
A Long Herndon of the American CoiuiuIk
Hloners at 1'ariH, Followed
a Joint Session.
The
-The American peace
from
Paris, Oct. 24.
commissioners were 111
10:30 a. 111 . until almost 2 p. 111 ., w hen
they repaired to the joint session.
They took with them a carefully-pre
pared written answer to the proposals
of the Spaniards regarding t uba,
is understood that the American reply
is, to a certain degree, in the nature of
a compromise proposal.
session
lt
fact
and
was
is
Uenrri.1 Offleer, »l the War ltepupt inent.
Washington, Oct. 24.—A number of
general officers of the army called at
the war department. Some of them
had been recently down south exam
ining' tlie sites for camps where troops
under their commands will be sta
tioned. Most of them will go to Phil
adelphia to take part in the peace ju
bilee.
office at one time Major-Generals Cop
pi nger, Wheeler, Chaffee, Young and
Kiefer, and Brigadier-Generals Davis
and Oates.
of
There were at the secretary's
in
wife
was
Movement of Troops South.
Knoxville, Tenn., Oct. 24.—While no
official orders have been received re
garding the movement of the second
division to'points south, it is under
stood that it will begin on October 27.
Crew of tlie lrm» Renewed.
Halifax, N. 8., Oct. 24.—The crew of
the brigantine Irma, which went
ashore on Three Cap shoals, entra
to Halifax harbor, Saturday night,
were rescued.
Fruit
her
on
1\
jubi
VviLL UnaR x'i-iki_N iaLH.
r
ri
bi>-iUi Will In- lulu tliui Trut'nuUUAUuu
kL
V. a •. ii : to .. Urt. 2 I.
ed turn
i'ee'c
ieall to
It
The
AiOlu.a v
Tan
Hie
>1011
CIS VMHIKI it-i
ery
clearly
moiling
an iimmatuiii.
upp
The president is sal is tied at last that
the hpauish coiiiiuissu
posely delaying the negotiations. 1 hit
is the belief 01 the American commis
e time has now come to
cut off all false pleas and emne direct
ly to the main issue left open by the
protocol, namely, the disposition ol
Philippines. I p to this point the en
tire time of the commissioners has
GEN.
are pur*
The
N.
sioners. 1
San
The
ho
been consumed in repeated efforts on
the part of the Spanish commissioners
to force the C uban debt question upon
the attention of the joint commission
against the linn opposition of the
American commissioners. The latter
To
of
duv
have stated as positively
is they could
that under no circumstances will they
assume sovereignty over Cuba, involv
pos-st
board
and
ing an assumption of the Cuba
and the time has
debt.
v come when, in
the opinion of the America
sioners, tin* Spaniards must be
made
lend
from
never
coinmis
mde
to understand that this answer is final
and e<
elusive. So far the America
vhile preserving a
c!t r.
commissioners,
firm attitude, have treated the Spa
inrds with the utmost courtesy and
oHv.
consideration, allowing frequent post
poncmcnts of the work of the joint
commission to aceonmi
take
ilate the Span
States
The
i
Plates
iards, but now. without departing
from their court oi
Spaniards, the Ann*rica
is treatment of the
eommission
ill find it inn
ibeut upon then.
to speak ver;
initiation of the United States gi
ent to regard this matter of the Gn
us passed
the deter
ern
f<
ban debt a
vereigntv
over and beyi
l! recall.
bei
A
DIED IN THE ORIENT.
DiNpiit* li Fn
DtntlliH ii
ei'nl Otis Showing'the
His Ittimiiiiml >
t ho List Report.
oi
Washington, Oct. 24.
dispatch has been iceci'
The following
lo
department:
part
Manila, Oct. 23.--To Adj
eral, Washington:
a n t-< icn
Fullowing deaths
since last report:
October 15.
Quartcri
aster .Sergeant
William I). (lillespie. First
shot
outid.
the
October Kb
of idler.
•p. Christopher R<
Ci
to
Tweii t \ -t hi I'd
infant ry.
lied; Private ,l<
dn
las H. Ada
band, I figliteciit Ii infant ry, a leoholism.
October
If Private
a- S. Han
son. First Nebraska, typhoid fever.
(letober 2D
Privates Ira Gritlin.Firs
West
fever; Charles 11.
Buhl, Second Oregi
Getob.r 21 (
First
i mgil is.

to
hlahao.
dysentery;
Thomas F. Fitzgerald. Twenty-third
infantry, diarrhoea: I
ate S
tilt*
1 , First
Cali fornia.
pneu
tot
iher2
Private Da
(le'
del Me Elliott.
the
to
or
Ilie
the
First Moutnun
Da
e unknown S
rgl. John A. (Ih
or. First Nebraska, pneumonia:
Pri
vales lb nrv \. Slu
. First California
dysentery; Frank W. .1
tv-third infa
be
that
• id fever; E.
of
It
lt
nei '■(
| Signed]
OTIS
THE TABLES TURNED.
Gen.
Tod SI.
Attnelied b.v the !.«
iplulned
ent.
don Prea
Beet
lie < .
fi» 1 r Tith
r 1
London. Oct. 3 1 . The
wliich have hitherto been aln
imous in their praise of Tod Sloi
American jockey, denounce liis inipu
li lion of unfairness on the part of the
Sandown Park judges. The Sun savs:
"The best tiling tha 1 ei
Sloan is that he will promptly earrv
out his expressed intention to betakt
hiniself,
country. lie has already received more
would have been extended
lie'
\\
ishoil fot
the
ith bis foil
vers, out of tlie
tlie
ter
to other jockeys."
Continuing, the Sun recommends the
withdrawal of his license
Lord William Beresford's attention tc
the fact that, in its opinion, Sloan b
unworthy to ride the prince of Wales
horse in the race for the Cambridge
shire stakes.
from
hen
reply
of
and calls
lt
Yellow Fever ixt Monterey, 31 ex loo.
Laredo, Tex., Oct. 24.—-According U
latest advices from Monterey, Mexico
there an* two additional cases of yel
low fever reported by Dr. Me Means
who states that his patients are af
flicted with black vomit. A l'ullmai
sleeper from Monterey was stoppei
across the river, and Monterey trains
will run only from Now L a redo, Mex
ico, for the present.
inent.
of
at
them
sta
Phil
ju
Cop
and
Davis
Strike Broken and Union DUrupted.
Columbus, ().. Get. 24. A special tc
the Dispatch from Pomeroy, ().. says:
The miners' strike, which has exist
ed since March, is broken, and the mi
organization is disrupted.
Pacific mine lias started up, and the
men are scrambling to get in at re
duced wages.
The
no
re
second
under
27.
of
went
night,
pers
I
Gen. Merritt and 3Ha* William* Private!]
Married.
London. Get. 24. Maj.-Gen. Weslev
Merritt, U. S. N„ was married private
lv to Miss Laura Williams, of Chicago
who recently arrived here from Novi
York. Tlie greatest secrecy is main
tained regarding the ceremony.
r
111
ri
llUi
The
1
kL
rail
wars,
captain,
ther
ricd t
ahun,
The InsularCabinet Have Taken the
Oath and Will Try to End
Party Struggle.
husband
died
La 11 a
bride,
in
to live
in the
GEN. ORTEGA HAS TAKEN HIS DEPARTURE.
The ICvurimtIon uf the I Aland by Spain h
V Complete The ('oiumlssiont*i
lteturu 11.
a
N.
I(h Member*
states.
Ready
lluve Made Many Friends During Theli
Stay.
police
he
San Jua
de Porto Rico, Oct. 24.
,1
Says
ator
first
The
embers of the insular cabinet
ho have taken the oath of allegi;
ith befitting
.'olemnity, will issue a manifesto an
nouneing their
To the United States
States
*soluti<
to uvon
partisan polities and end party strife
About $12,000 have bee
ceded
Yulee,
collected as
was
customs duties since October Is, the
duv the United States formally tool*
vhen
• f Porto Bico.
pos-st ssion
name
The
Artega Hun ti
Gen. Ortega embarked Sum!:
board tin* Spanish steamer Montev'uh
and was saluted fr
famous
isiana,
ll«
Ilie shore.
made a speech declaring that the is
lend had been surrendered by
from Madrid, adding that he
never have done s
•del
The
church,
mit
without such
as saluted, n
or
sail
ilorsed
The general
c!t r.
the United States cruiser New
oHv. Rear-Admiral Schley and his slat!
Dr.
aiting tin
hoard the Newark, a
of ( onmiander Suow.
command of the United Stab
.luan, before d
ho is K
actio
take
nl station at Sa
ing
parting.
Col. Hunter, secretary of the United
States military commission, who is ii;
i* Pome on Goto
ii tin* Philadelphia.
The ('ommUilonerH Have Mnd« Friends.
i he officio
Plates ci
inent
house
At
Capt.
his
United
populn ri t y
has
f<
um
llOIll
■aceful farewell
bei
condi
nt lu
A m
ma
Washing
he mi
eointnissi
rler to represent to
tliorilies there tin
imn
oi
i,m
;v:u-irilion of l'orto Kirn
i. Oct. 24. d
Wnshingtc
I M ' 111
part
v.
stating that tin* ovsioitn'
ehnicr.'
King
)f the la
AS A NAVAL STATION.
t, l'orto Kico. Will Be One of
Important Naval Station*
hi tb<* I-uttire.
the
Washi
Get. 24. Si*
the initial s'
IgtOll.
make Saa Jua
f the United State's in
naval stat
West l lid ii
asked to
ma
appropriate
- of the
■ aval stations the United States Ii
money
ako it
to
mg' says:
ill be" of
"A suit
tilt* Util
inent, a
list importa
il to the 11 a
Kent
inter 1 i
the
possession
Col.
from ever
bet*
lie
d: "Congre
be asked to appropriate a h
state
of monev for the improvi'inent of San
harbor a
It is probable that lie*
iiinoil .is 1 ar :i
nlikcl.v that a
danu
lt is in
ill he .■stahiished.'
I
A NARROW ESCAPE.
iif
<* N«*i
1 .1 VLij. Brook* roi
to il
Gen. Wood
el<
er*8 Ci
Cuba, Ocl. 2
Santiago de
if 11 .
the
com
lie act i ng military ei
\\ <
Ml.
here, and Maj. Brooks, had 0
evening, from
ape, Sunday
disaster.
They
111 Hie
rious
down
castle.
seemingly, had IDO pounds of steam
50 pounds in
the ba
has
bieli,
eam launch
m hoard a s
fot
But she lc.si
registered.
the first two ini'
ut os. a
tlie
charge
giaeer wt
tiring that tin*re
vas little
r no wa
vas about to fill it
while it was almost red hot. Maj.
Brooks saw the danger, stopped the
launch, had the tire withdrawn, and
tlie launch
ter in the boiler.
the
tc
b
as towed hack
The
starting place.
charged.
Maj. Starr and Maj.
turned, Sunday from a trip to l'.arn
eoa, Sagua and other places. They
report that the
U
yel
af
lest il nt ion
among the Cubans nt the places vis
ited. and they add that the distribu
tion of free rations is having a demor
alising effect upon the people, who do
not want to go to work, though the
sugar estates, in common
industries, are badly in need of la
borers.
ith other
Fntnt RhMwi
y Accident.
T.<
Angeles Oil., Oct. 24.
The en
gine on the east-bound train on the
Santa Barham branch of the Southern
tc
Pacific, inn
station, and Engineer Davis wa
under tlie cab and crushed to death
The fireman
ously. hut not fatally, injured.
IV the track near ('nntul
of
caught
mi
the
re
The
Soldier Ktnhhrd.
A T<
I
Richard
Francisco, Get.
24.
Novi
main
Chet wood, of Company I. First Tennes
see. was stabbed in the back
saloon. Chet wood was on the provost
guard anil \>«.s trying to arrest an un
known Tennessee private when the
letter stabbed him with n bayonet
Cl.etwood's condition is critical.
bile in ii
SOUTHERN GLEANINGS.
A ll.i |»*y \«u
The venerable lieiiry O'Neill, a vet?
ami civil
rail uf both the Mexieu
hi ell he wa
wars, in the latter of
captain, is, at 92 years of age, the la
ther of li
ricd t
ahun, hot before that lie had lw»e
lirst child.
mar
to Miss Mol lie IaU
years ago
the
In
ives, both of
children,
she became a
husband of two
died without leaving
La 11 a ha 11 was
bride, ( apt. O'Neill is hale and hearty,
in spite of his great age, and bids fair
to live to be 100. ile was a volunteer
in the Mexican war. but
Miss
hei
•onnnanded
war between the
the Louisville
•hen
ed a good pension from the
a company in the
states. He served
police force until 20 years ago,
he ree.
government.
,1 i'W'rt iii th«' United St.atfHi Senate.
Says the Ne
ator Simon, of Oreg
first Jew to hold a seat in the United
York Tribune: Seu
, will no.t be the
States senate, three others having pre
vus David L.
ceded him. The first
Yulee, of Florida,
vhose father's name
•lected a repre
was Levy,
sentntive in ls45 as David Levy, but
expired he hud bis
change to David Levy ^ ulee.
ish senator was the
vhen his tc
name
The second Jo
famous Judah P. Benjamin, of Loo
ks Benjamin
isiana, and the third
Franklin Jonas, of Louisi;
Tin* Holaton ( onferem
The Holston conference
church, south, at Man*
- of the M. K.
on, Tenn.. ili
>f Barbee cV Smith.
ilorsed the art
he
itli regard t<
r claim.
tor of the .Midland
Dr. K. JTi
Methodist,
heir
demned
ho has c(
ed. The incident
i. thei
actio
resi
of chary
■s of fra
ern
ing $
se uf the publishing
inent for the
house property during the civil
Hllariou*.
Id Mini XVhh I
The
At Belfast, Marshall
us shot and lulled b\
Capt. .lot* Dye
his son, John Dye.
The
I months, and
y
the disturba
li
llOIll
drunken
landed that life old
mt the father ap
condi ti<
I. lie di
i keep quiet:. I
ma
proacln-d hii
Ii rough the head twice.
causing
icdiatc death.
imn
id.
AkshshIiiii
31 ere lift
William King, a prom
icrchaut at Gregory. Wc
i * 11 1 young
xlriitT coun
d at- night.
v. Ark..
King
arranging
as busy at
lien he
vas
tired through
■s after
stated that he hail not
of
shot him.
the slightcs
a I'ermaiient t'aiup.
In an aim
and not merely a teinpo
len. Corbin
at Anniston
affair. Adjt.-t
in
Senator Morga
p. The people of Annisi
belli can
ma
official i
rumors t<
various
ii li 1 * 111:1
•n
effect.
tlm
of
«-ii Anderson.
•n Amlersor
-known eil
in
died nt May lie ill, after
Kent ii
a
from paraiys
nui tin
n democrat ic mem
Col. Anderson
bet* of ci
lawyers the
e of the tines'
lie
state
enlt liy
estate to
children.
One <Vi
,\t Oweiisl
\ liee Wolf
suit <d .Mrs.
ai ns!
danu
v t.i.-utenant Miuter lirnnett f<
I i.li
i-t for the plain
rend.-red a
iif of out* cent and cost
t
put Tolwn
I ndepei
The
If
•ilie. Ky..
•anted b> the
11 .
they
ilecl a re
11 c. now
com
itb other coneerns to fight the
mite
k.'ljpp'N First Stud**
Ti
in
institute of Alubuma
The Tiiskci
ed its tirsi
st uden
has just reeei
young colored
Ollier students from Cuba ami Pori
Kill
in ..Hiking Buttle*hip*.
To l
Tin* Marsdei
>t Ovveiis
company
wa
it
Maj.
the
and
boto. Ky.. is shipping its ne
cellulose, t
j mod
Grump's shipyard at Phil
It is
se in battleships.
for
adelphia
made of eon
stalks.
AitvlMMt Its Return.
conference of tlie
church.
The Tennessee
south.
Methodist Episcopal
adopted a resolution
turn to the government of the
advising the re
var
claim paid the church.
ion
I for 111* Money.
Calvin McCou, sergeant major of tlie
regiment,
Jackson street. Montgomery,
He had been murdered for his
vis
do
the
la
as found
Third Alabama
dead
Ala.
money.
other
The (iroatcit **l,oc**e" 3Ltrk«*t.
, N. (\. claims the distinc
Winstt
tion of selling more pounds of leaf to
bacco direct from tlie farmer than any
other loose market in the world.
en
the
the Bench.
Will (Jo llaek
resigned
Col. dohn S. Candler has
d of the Third Georgia and
the courts
comma
will continue to preside i
of tin* Stone Mountain district.
'do Ft
Sold Furly
li. R. Early sold his stock farm,
Earlymede, three miles north of Ver
sailles, Ky.. containing 245 acres, for
$24,000, to Henry ( . Dunigan.
31u*dr.
Among the recent additions to the
brary of congress at Washington, D
C., is a collection of music printed in
tlie south in civil war times.
un
the
in ii

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