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The Durant news. (Durant, Miss.) 1882-1985, August 03, 1950, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87065228/1950-08-03/ed-1/seq-2/

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1 THE DURANT NEWS
WAgfTL BRANNON SMITH (Mrs. Walter D.)_PUBLISHER
ESTABLISHED IN 1878
PUBLISHED EVERY THURSDAY _
BNarad u second class matter at the Post Office at Durant.
Mississippi, under the act of March 3, 1879
Subscription Rotas
Anywhere in Holmes County—2.00. Outside Holmes County—230.
Boost Mississippi

It has long been one of our pet ideas that people who
live in ‘Mississippi do not boost our state as it should be
boosted—and some of our ignorant citizens are downright
apologetic about coming from the Magnolia State-having
allowed themselves to become intimidated by the uninform
ad and misinformed peoples of other sections of this great
United States.
We are proud of the splendid progress this wonderful
Btate has made—especially in the past fourteen years when
we have been here within its borders to observe its march
forward—for this week we observe our fourteenth anniver
sary as a citizen of Holmes county and Mississippi. And we
are a citizen by choice, not because we can’t help it.
Every citizen, we believe, should be a genuine booster
for his community, county and state—and personally we
deem it a privilege to acquaint everyone with whom we come
In contact wherever we go about the glories and wonders of
the Magnolia State
It is a privilege, too, we believe, to belong to the “Help
bg Build Mississippi Club” which was organized last fall—
a group of citizens bound together to keep themselves in
formed about Mississippi’s progress and let the world know
about it—a sort of super chamber of commence or booster
elub for the state.
Every resident of Mississippi has an obligation to keep
Informed about current happenings in this state and to
apread that knowledge everywhere he goes—even among
our own people.
We’d like to see the day come when every Mississippian
hi as proud to proclaim his state as are our friends from
Texas.
Why I Am Proud To Be A Mississippian
Our good friend, Sid R. Harris, editor and publisher
•f the Houston Times-Post and the new president of the
ICississippi Press Association, was the guest editorial writer
for the ‘‘Helping Build Mississippi” monthly publication in
' July.
This monthly news sheet is published as a public ser
vice by the Mississippi Power and Light Company. In it
Is recorded every issue the march of progress of our state—
industrial, business, educational. It is highly informative
and inspirational.
Sid wrote a very interesting and revealing article oni
the subject: “Why I Am Proud To Be A Mississippian.” We
think you’ll enjoy it too, so we reprine it herewith:
Once a Mississippian, always a Mississippian! There’s
something about a Mississippian that, to us, literally ra
diates hospitality, sincerity, integrity and loyalty—all
wrapped into one. \
Never have we known a native of this state who was *
not proud of the fact that he is a Mississippian.
> »mo to think of it, maybe the redskin who called the
mighty river ‘The Mississippi” knew what he was talking
about.
"Mississippi”—history teaches us—is the Indian word
(Or “Father of Waters.”
And during these turbulent times, when there are forces
among us who would put state against state, and race against
race, we like to think that perhaps Mississippi might well be
referred to as “the father of the other states.”
Understand, we might have to label some of our “47
children” as “step-children,” for certainly they have wan
dered from the “parental path” set forth by the fathers of
•ur constitution.
But we can and must keep up the fight to try and point
the way that leads back home—back to a system of free
enterprise, wherein the dignity of the individual and the
certain inalienable rights preserved by our constitution for
the states are not tampered with or altered.
Proud to be a Mississippian?
.We could go on forever emulating the unlimited advan
tages and opportunities of our beloved state. Mississippi’s
industrial growth is phenomenal under the most favorable
of industrial laws—the State has an improved system of cor
poration laws, as liberal as those of any state in the Union
tax exemptions are exceedingly favorable toward new in
dustry—homesteads are exemoted un to $5,000.00
OUR STATE A LEADER
Mississippi offers the most delightful climate of any
•State of the Union—Mississippi has one of the largest and
most attractive educational systems of any State of the
■'South—Mississippi has the largest percentage birth rate and
the lowest death rate of any of the Southern states_Mis
sissippi's number of cattle is greater than any other South
ern state, except Texas and Oklahoma—Mississippi’s ma
laria control program has been recommended by the Fed
eral government as a model for other states—the U. S. Field
Trials Association for bird dogs at Holly Springs is the old
est. club ot its kind in the United States—Mississippi leads
two-thirds of the states in the number of milk cows and
Aeifers on the farms—Mississippi ranks ninth among all
oil-producing states—Mississippi is the leading tung oil pro
ducing state—Mississippi highways are admittedly the peer
•af those of any state in the union.—Mississippi’s financial
condition is sound and, thanks to a number of efficient ad
ministrations, this state’s bonds are always in demand.
Yes, we are proud to be a Mississippian! Ours is a great
lemtagc!
But as already pointed out, we must be vigilant We
a»OHt be alert, lest already-evident forces succeed in their
efforts to overnight convert our commonwealth into a slave
m. ™e. beautiful Magnolia, you know, is our State flower.
doL nnf PUri l s£?nes JU8t 80 *ong as the human hand
touch it. Even the touch of a finger causes a black
_Eik? the purity that is personified in the Magnolia we
y Pr°,Ud °f the fact that Mississippi, especially in
recent years, has sought to keep its record spotlessand that
our leaders have had the intestinal fortitudMo s^ak \oud
1*"d t0 ,exert effort to Irak,, certain that
Z te Um^redwUh!’’ ri*hts »•»"
T"he eyes of the nation are on Mississippi ?
No other state in the union can match the stridec
Save made in industry and agriculture. S WC
But while we are proud of our state from this side of
the ledger we are equally as proud of the fact that we live
in a state where its people show by voice and ballot that they
will not swap their birthright for a mess of political pottage.
Any reader of this newspaper may become a member
of the “Helping Build Mississippi Club” if he likes and re
ceive this monthly newspaper by a telephone call or a post
card mailed to us. There are no dues or fee of any kind.
"Made In Mississippi"
It was our privilege during the latter part of last week
to attend press day during the annual farm and home week
at State College.
It is always a special kind of pleasure when Mississippi
newspaper people get together. We always have a lot of fun
—and never fail to gain something constructive. Our friends
at State College are wonderful hosts and leave nothing un
done for their guests.
Aside from the fellowship of renewing old acquain
tances and making new friends we saw something at State
College which we wish every single reader of this news
papers could have seen. It was a "Made in Mississippi” ex
hibit.
In this exhibit were a great many beautiful and use
ful articles—all manufactured in Mississippi—and it was
very impressive. It was so impressive, as a matter of fact,
that some people viewing it were heard to remark that they
knew very well “all those things couldn’t have been made in
Mississippi!”
All nf urliis.V, Jill i u 1 f rm nlAnn/vM^I.. « i .... J _ 1_
— - -v.v^uvhvij nniu nc naiu ouuvc
about the importance of keeping ourselves informed about
/hat is going on in our state.
Among the things that made a keen impression on us
were beautifully designed furniture for bedrooms and liv
ing rooms, (and some bedroom furniture we didn’t like\,
some lovely office desks and mirrors for use in the home,
beautiful hosiery and lingerie of all types for milady, stylish
swimming suits, Talon slide fasteners, substantial and du
rable work clothing for men, farm machinery, building ma
terials of all kinds, including some wonderfuul looking brick.
There were hosts of other things in the exhibit such as can
ned foods, hot sauce, pickles, feedstuffs of all kinds for ani
mals, smartly packaged meal and flour, the famous Phillips’
Milk of Magnesia, automobile and tractor tires of all sizes,
practically all kinds of processed foods from both meat and
milk, and any number of others too numerous to mention,
we just wish all of you could have seen it
Our only regret was that we didn’t see there some la
dies hosiery manufactured in the Durant Manufacturing
Company which was the first industry to be established in
the state of Mississippi under the original BAWI act—ner
haps next year this will be remedied. **
Mississippi truly marches on industrially!
CLASSIFIED ADS |
---— I
FOR sale—Lignt weignt con
:rete blocks for sale. Winona
Concrete Products Company.
Phone 332-J, Winona, Miss.
HELP WANTED — MAN OR
WOMAN — to take over route
of established Watkins Cus
tomers in Durant. Full time in
come, $45 weekly up. No car or
investment necessary. We will
help you get started. Write C.'
R. Ruble, % The J. R. Watkins
Company, Memphis, Tennessee.
47-47-p
FOR SALE — 100 lb. capacity
Coolerator. A-l condition. Mrs.
Eugene Cole, Phone 166. 47-ltnp
FOR SALE — Piano. Spinet Bar
gain. Here’s an unusual oppor
tunity for some lucky family to
secure a beautiful Spinet Piano
at a bargain price. Looks and
plays exactly like new. Fully
guaranteed. Standard 88 note
keyboard. Requires only a
small down payment and as
sume a few minimum monthly
payments. So quick action will
be necessary. Information as to
where to see this beautiful
Spinet will be given by writing
immediately to Credit Manager,
care of Sudduth Warehouse, 514
South Broadway, Tupelo, Miss.
45-3tnp
1AISIT The Antique Shop wtiere
you are always welcome. Leila
W\ Guess, Durant, Highway 51
South. Phone 225-W.
FOR RENT—Three-room unfur
nished apartment. Ed Rush,
311 Madison Street, Durant,
Phone 215-M.
A’ANTED — Salesladies. Sell our
Nylon hose, men’s socks, wo-'
men’s anklets. Liberal commis
sion. If you are now selling, this
is a wonderful sideline. Write
Miss Monroe Hosiery Company,
P. O. Drawer 402. Aberdeen,
Miss. . 46-2tp
iVANTED — Everyone 5 years old
and over to take a Blood Test.
Holmes County Health Depart
ment. Open Mondays through
Saturday noon. 46-tfnp
Misses Annie and Georgie Me
Intyre attended the meeting of
officers of the Lexington Munici
pal Concert Association in Lex
ington Tuesday morning.
e
FUU- P8#W|I P WITH Oil FILTER,
sue rivivur OIL-BATH AIR CLEANER
S
• No other hill-size Plorup truck in America
h®* a l°w*r suggested list price than
the 6-cylinder Ford F-1 Pickup shown here.
This Ford price includes oil filter.
Air Wing ventilators, oil-bath air cleaner
and many features available only
at extra cost in other trucks. Local taxes.'
freight and handling charges extra,
t
A DOZEN REASONS WHY AMERICA’S NO. 1
TRUCK VALUE WILL DO MORE PER DOLLAR!
THRIFTY fS-H-P. SIK-CYUNDER ENGINE for all
around performance in the 4,700 lb.
G.V.W. class. 100-h.p. V-8 available at
slight extra cost.
IOADOSRATIC IGNITION saves gas by providing
spark advance for changes in engine load
and speed.
IUGNTIMHT PISTONS save oil. Cana-ground
aluminum alloy for true fit and better oil
control.
All-Sim BOOT with spacious 49 cu. ft. of
loadspace.
HTOBAUIIC BRAKES with true and easy stop
ping action.
OEMOUNTABU BRAKE DRUMS simplify main
tenance. Drum can be bought separately
for replacement. f
SHOCK ABSORBERS, airplane-type, standard
front and rear.
■ i
MILLION DOLLAR CAR with door-glass _
Wing ventilators and Level Action
suspension.
SYNCHRO-SILENT TRANSMISSION for easy, quick '
and quiet shifting. 1
6YR0-6RIP CLUTCH for better damping
action. I
I
HYKHD REAR AMI with integral type bon*
ing. Shafu removable from wheel esai
ROU ACTION STOIUM with ntsiile bearing* i
for easier control* ,
ford Trucking Costs loss bscows
FORD TRUCKS LAST LONGER
> M**< ttslstrotloo 4ot« s^*,*#*,000 *"Nks, Ms kiw-ii pnn M Timfcs fast Israel
Hand Motor Company
Durant, Miss.
j, LOCAL NEWS V
! Miss Annie Meeks of Brooks
ville has been visiting relatives in
Durant.
Miss May Jenkins went to
Jackson this week for several
days. She will accompany Mr.
and Mrs. Eugene Fly to the Gulf
Coast for a visit with their niece
and daughter, Mrs. Dwight Mat
thews, before returning home.
Mrs. A. L. Stevens was a Jack
son visitor this week.
Mrs. W. H. McKenzie, Jr., Mrs. |
M. J. Fowlkes and Mrs. Wilbur
Reed shopped in Kosciusko this
week.
Mr. and Mrs. C. G. VanKeuren
had as their dinner guests Fri
day at Tommie’s Cafe Mr. am
Mrs. E. W. Welch and daughter,
Barbara, of Las Vegas, N. M., and
Mrs. Charlotte Tindall.
A wonderful vacation trip to
the Smoky Mountains and
through the Blue Ridge section of
North Carolina and other interest
ing points was had by Dr. ana
Mis. J. W. Howell, Mrs. A. M.
Stonestreet and Mrs. C. G. Van
Keuren.
Mr. Harry O’Cain and son, Rich
ard, have returned from Chicago
tand Wisconsin where they at
tended the bedside of Mr. O’Cain’s
sister who sustained a severe in
jury from a fall suffered on a re
cent visit in Chicago.
Mr. and Mrs. Walter Odom ac
companied their son, Jimmy, to
the Jackson Airport on Wednes
day where he boarded a plane for
San Antonio, Texas. Jimmy has
volunteered for the Air Force
and will take his training there.
Mr. D. M. Barraneo went to New
Orleans on the City of New Or
leans Saturday night and spent
Sunday with relatives. Mrs. Bar
ranco and Josephine, returned
with him after enjoying a two
weeks visit with their relatives.
Mrs E. R. Dickerson and daugh
ter, Anne, of Jackson, spent the
weekend with her mother, Mrs.
Leila W. Guess.
Mrs. M. D. Baine and Mrs A. A
Derrick were Lexington visitors
Tuesday afternoon.
Mr. and Mrs. B. F. Friedman.
were Lexington visitors last week.'
Mrs. Johnny Tartt is visiting in
Greenwood.
Mrs. Bob Lee Sanders, Colum
bus. was here Sunday to visit her
father, Mr. H. B. Sargent.
Notice!
4
We, The Undersigned Barber Shops Will
Advance The Price On All
HAIRCUTS TO 75c SHAVES 50c
Effective
• August 7,1950
All Other Prices Will Remain The Same.
HERRIN'S BARBER SHOP, Durant
TERRY'S BARBER SHOP, Durant
RENACKER'S BARBER SHOP, Lexington
HERRIN'S BARBER SHOP, Lexington
B.F. JOHNSON'S BARBER SHOP, Tchula
MASSEY'S BARBER SHOP, Kosciusko
ALDY'S BARBER SHOP, Kosciusko
NOWELL'S BARBER SHOP, Kosciusko
ROSCOE'S BARBER SHOP, Kosciusko
^ _ i

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