OCR Interpretation


The Durant news. (Durant, Miss.) 1882-1985, March 27, 1952, Image 5

Image and text provided by Mississippi Department of Archives and History

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87065228/1952-03-27/ed-1/seq-5/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 5

In Europe
hr William B. Dillingham
Austria — The quickest dollar
to be made these days in Europe
is on the Austro-German fron
tier. A sack of coffee beans car
ried across the border illegally
will bring a big enough profit
to the smuggler to afford a months
vacation. Although this is the
quickest way of making money
here, it isn’t exactly the easiest.
German frontier guards have cal
led in the help of highly trained
dogs to track down every last
coffee bean that tries to run the
blockade.
These animals, popularly known
as “kaffeeschniffelhunds” (coffee
sniffing hounds), are said to be j
able to catch the scent of cofee
at no less than 50 yards — re
gardless of wind direction. Their
I training has now been boosted to
I a year and one half, making them
tough competition for the Austro
German coffee smugglers. Be
fore the dogs were introduced to
their work, armed with this spe
cialized education, a man could
carry a fully loaded sack of cof
fee beans across the border with
out too much trouble — provided
he knew the terrain. Now, how
ever, special vests have been
constructed designed to keep in
the odor of the coffee and permit j
the smuggler to run with his ]
cargo when the situation becomes j
pressing. The Kaffecschniffle- j
hund is the new curse of these
struggling “importers.” Many
people who make their living
in this illegal manner have re
turned to smuggling ball-bear- i
i ings and cigarettes in disgust.
Make mealtime
refreshment, time
Wherever you go, ice-cold Coke |
is almost always at your elbow.
It belongs beside your plate, too.
Enjoy it right from the frosty bottle.
SOTTIED UNDER AUTHORITY Of THE COCA-COLA COMPANY SY
JACKSON COCA-COLA BOTTLING CO.
"Caku"h a f ghfwW troth-mark._ © 1953. THE COCA-COLA COMPANY
H 0 ME
HINTS
BY
FRANCES
FORTENBERRY
Home Economic*
Director Mi**. Powti |
A I Ijfht Co.
-- i
GIVE VOnt HOME
AIIEQI'ATK LIGHT
By Marlene Hubbard
Home Economic* Student
Mississippi Southern Collcfm
Your home is only ar modern
aa Its lighting. A modern home
lighting system Includes:
Light for Seeing
Light for Safety (
i Light for Comfort
Light for Decoration
There are two types of light for j
seeing, direct and indirect. Direct '
light is when the light shines di
rectly into your eyes which causes
eye strain, indirect light is secured
by the light falling on the task or
work and reflecting hack to your
eyes. Indirect is the best type of
light for sccin*.
Hints on tne service that light
renders for safety may include
many precautions such as light
ing for the stairway, closet, yard,
garage, street and walks. It is very
easy and inexpensive to install
lighting for safety, but very costly
if an accident occurs from the ab
sence of light. The accident may
only be a skinned knee or it may
he a broken leg, a fractured skull,
or even a wrecked car which r y
result in a death. %
* Light for visual comfort re
quires the correst amount of
glare-free, adequately distributed.
HTlH woll fllrprtAH liirht for von to
enjoy reading, Bewing, or any form
of work. Light should be free from
bright spots, provide a general
lighting throughout the area sur
rounding your task, and fall on
the task rather than on your eyes.
Lighting decorations are often
used for many types of eye-catch
ing arrangements for parties, spe
cial occasions, garden displays,
and even room decorations. There
is mo end or boundary for anyone
who has initiative and who uses
lighting methods for decoration.
You ure the boss of light and
if you use it properly and ef
ficiently in your home, your home
will be more modern. r
The situation seems to have be
come somewhat critical because
importers with hundreds of cross
ings to their credit are being
caught everyday.
In a German restaurant a cup
of coffee can run up to fifty
cents. The government places a
luxury tax of about $1.50 on
every pound, while in Austria the
same coffee can be had for about
15 cents a cup. The tax in Aus
tria on this commodity is not at
all high because coffee is hand
in hand with weinerschnitzel as
a staple of Austrian life. This
is the situation which has ereat
: ed a problem for the Kaffeesch
nifflehund. A pound of coffee in
Salsburg, Austria retails at a
bout $2 while the same product
just across the frontier in Bad
Kb New! Kb Able)
ST1ATO-STAI V4
Kb built for Keeps!
lib already America's
most talked about
car!
t
I
For this Ford is new from
road to roof. Its Coachcraft
Bodies are longer, stronger
... it gives you Full-Circle
Visibility. Then, too, you get
curve-leveling, bump-erasing
Automatic Ride Control . . .
and a host of other new
features. ,0 > ^ony« without notkt. Whitt Mtw*9
hrti if tnroiktblt, two - toot coJmb
Ukittraiod, ophorioi at OMtTO eoA
Come in and Test Drive' the
’52 at your Ford Dealer’s
FJD.A.F. SSi "ZS&P
HAND MOTOR COMPANY
Durant, Miss. phone 285
Textfs Dust Fills
5kies In Holmes
Caused By Drouth
Holmes county has a very de
finite complaint against' the
Si ate of Texas because of the
mass of dust filling the skies
"verhead for the last six weeks,
playing razzle dazzle with radio
reception, painting the fleecy
white clouds a dirty color, and
sometimes leaving automobile
tops covered with mud even
though they had been traveling
on dry concrete highways and
streets.
The dust comes from a huge
an a of the Lone Star state which
has been parched for more than
18 months by drouth.
One unusual feature over Holm
es county this week has been
glorious red sunrises like those
of golden sunsets. Of course, it
cauhes much raising of eye
brows among the intellectuals to
even suggest any one clambering
out of bed at such an unearthly
hour as six a.m., so the chances
are but few have witnessed the
gorgeous sunrise. Instead of the
usually bright silvery gleam, the
beams from the morning sun are
making the dust clouds shimmer
in golden red hues.
One of the necessities as a re
sult of the dust is that persons
wearing glasses had best wash
Relchenhall (the coffee clearing
house), can be sold for $4 or $5.
Twenty-five dollars a month is
a living wage in Austria so that
if a citizen dares to export 12
pounds of coffee, and escapes the
jaws of the Kaffeeschnifflehund.
he can sit around for the remain
ing 29 days in a beer hall reading
the newspaper. Of course, the
new coffee vests, which are con
sidered an essential part of every
smuggler’s anti-schnifflehund
equipment, hold only six pounds.
This doubles the risk involved,
but not enough to discourage the
rather present heavy traffic.
There is a story circulating
through,the border villages which
has caused considerable delight
among the smuggling interests.
It seems that a Kaffeeschniffle
hund got the scent of a coffee
bean while on patrol. The dog
finally spotted the smuggler and
chased him up a tree. He was
barking and growling at his trap
ped prey when a bag of coffee
beans hit him in the “schniffle”
and knocked him out. It is re
ported that the hound hasn’t been
any good since.
F.T”i .
them several times a day. Not
accustomed to such a necessity
a numbei persons are wonder
ing why they are developing
headaches. So better wash your
glasses.
I^adio fans have been grumol
mg for weeks now because of j
stations fading in and out, or not
being received at all. The radio |
beams are blocked by the dust.
It was widespread throughout
the South this week.
! , !
Suggestion that Texas be given 1
back to the Indians is not gen
erally regarded as worthwhile J
for whether Indians or cowpokes
were in the overgrown state it
would make no difference — the
dust would continue to come as
long as the drouth lasts. Wea
ther scientists assert there is a
continual west to east wind
blowing high in the heavens and .
this brings the dust in an unend- j
ing sky parade. The worst thing
I ..... i
about it all is that the huge dust
bank is now above the rain
clouds and can’t be rained down.
Commercial sturgeon fishing
has died out in North America
because over-fishing depleted the
supply.
Lake St. Clair has low marshy
shores and a natural maximum
depth of about 21 feet.
1 il. .1
Where the Money You Pay
tor Telephone Service Goes!
The money we receive from telephone sub
scribers goes to meet day-to-day costs of opera
tion. It pays for wages, taxes, materials and
other items—costs which have risen tremen
dously during the past six years. After these and
other costs are paid, there must be something
left to pay investors a fair return for the use of
the money invested in telephone facilities.
Investment dollars, not money from subscribers,
enabled us to more than double our facilities
during the past six years. And it is to investors
that we must turn to help us meet Mississippi’s
continuing needs for more telephones. That's
why it is necessary that telephone rates be suffi
cient to assure earnings that are attractive to
people with savings to invest.
Because of investors' dollars, you can call
more than twice as many Mississippi telephones
as you could in 1945. And this bigger, better
package of telephone service has gone up in
price toss than most things and is a relatively
smaller item in the family budget than it was
ten years ago.
*7. S.'&avtU
Mississippi Manager
I the best possible service at the lowest possible cost
SOUTHERN BELL TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH COMPANY
_
TO ALL NATURAL GAS CUSTOMERS
Who Will Be Served By
MISSISSIPPI VALLEY GAS COMPANY
I
r On March 14, 1952, the Mississippi
Valley Gas Company purchased the
gas systems of Mississippi Power ft
Light Company. We are now furnish
ing you with gas service. But we will
\
need a few weeks to secure offices,
other working space and equipment.
During this period, Mississippi Power
& Light Company has agreed to furn
ish Mississippi Valley Gas Company
with temporary space and all other
» services you need to insure the same
dependable gas service that you have
been receiving.
» Your service needs will be handled
promptly, until further notice, through
the office of Mississippi Power
visit will receive prompt attention by
or on behalf of Mississippi Valley Gas
Company.
For a short time, the power com
pany will also continue to send your
monthly statements for Mississippi
Valley Gas Company.
Many members of Mississippi VaW
ley Gas Company will transfer from
Mississippi Power & Light. So you can
be sure that experienced people will
be working to continue your efficient,
a
dependable and low-cost gas service.
We ask your cooperation and un
derstanding during this short period of
transfer. We look forward to becoming
a citizen of your community and
& Light Company which has working with other citizens to
been furnishing gas service to bring better, more prosperous
your community. Your call or living for alL
%
Mississippi Valley Gas Company
Minor C. Summers Tom W. Crockett
President Exec. Vice-President

xml | txt