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The Mississippi enterprise. (Jackson, Miss.) 1938-current, December 05, 1942, Image 5

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87065258/1942-12-05/ed-1/seq-5/

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HOPEWELL NEWS
Sunday, November 22, the Bru
shey Creek Baptist Sunday school
opened at 10: a. m. with Supt V.
L. Harper in charge. The lesson
was well taught by the teachers
and enrollment and collection was
fine. Delegates elected for the Sun
day school institution were: Bro.
Otto Haley, O. Pendleton and Mi
ss Addie Mae Haley. The insTT
tution will be held at the Fryes
Breneh Sunday School at George
town. Everybody is asked to be
present. Bro. J. M. Murray, pres
ident. Following the Sunday school
the mission society held its regular
meeting with Sister Craft, Vice
President, presiding.
Eleven delegates were present
and the following delegates were
| elected to the Womei’s Institution
| in the persons of Siscter E va Earl
| Nelson, Willie Mae Catchings, M.
A. Berry, N. E. Johnson and Bu
iah Craft. This session will be held
at the Springfield society, Hope
well, the first Sunday in December.
Everybody is cordially invited to
be present. Dinner will be served
Mrs. M. A. Berry, Mrs. Nellie May,
both of Hopewell, will leave Sun
day November 29, for Yazoo City
to attend the 9th annual session
of the Grand High Court, Heroines
of Jericho. We wish for them
a successful meeting. The ladies
will spend the night in Jackson,
with Mrs. Berry’s sister who lives
on Georeg st.. Mrs. Eva Nelson,
Mrs. Lupla Johnson, Minnie Yo
ung, Mittie Mae Smith and Minnie
Dell Allen spent a few minutes
in the home of Mrds. Berry Sunday
Miss Mae Etha Sandifer is still |
on the sick list. We wish for her !
a speedy recovery.
EAST CANTON NEWS
Little Zion had her regular pas- j
torial Sunday with Rev. L. E. Jo-1
hnsoin, pastor of Jackson, deliver
ing the sermons.
The Y. W. A. Club met at the j
home of Mrs. Earnestine Peevie.1
the topic was Thanks to God. Two
visitors, Mrs. Coverton and Mrs.
Dorothy Jones were present. The
topic was interestingly discussed
by all.
New Bethel Sunday Schopl was
well attended Sunday with Class
No. 8 being the Banner Class, af-!
the raising $2.07. This Sunday j
school will always be found inspir
ing, rain or shine. 1
A large number of boys left i
Monday for physical examination
at Camp Shelby. It is really becom-'
ing lonesome in Canton and the ■
men and boys are greatly missed. |
The Y. W. A. members raff fled \
off a 24 pound sack of Angel Food
Flour Tuesday night at the school
house. The winner was Mr. Albert
Wynn.
Mr. and Mrs. Jim Calvert are
the proud parents of a baby boy
born Sunday night. At this writ
ing both baby and mother are
doing fine.
Mr. Nathan Provall attended the
Annual Conference in Kosciusko
Sunday.
Mr. Willie Crosley of Jackson,
Miss., visited his mother Mrs. Fan
nie Crossley, Sunday.
Mrs. Mattei Standfer from New
Orleans spent the weekend with
her cousin, Mrs. Sstella Stovall.
Cpl. Henry Gibson of Fort Dev
vons, Mass., was here on a 10
days furlough which he spent with
his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Green
Pullens. His friends are happjy to
see him.
Mrs. Virginia Martin has retur
ned home after spending a few
weeks in Pelehatchie, Miss., with
her sister.
Crystal Springs News
Mrs. Hattie Wolfe and Mrs. Ma
ttie Richardson attended the fun
eral of Fr. Edward Smith of Bro
okhaven.
Mr. and Mrs. John L. Cage are
happy to hace as their guest, Mr.
Cage’s sister, Mrs. Viola McGowan
of Chicago.
Mrs. Mattie Richardson visited
her daughter, Miss Vernal Raye
Richardson at Jackson College
Monday.
Sgt. Joseph Bartley, who is now
stationed at Camp Swift, Texas
spent 10 days at home with his
parents. He also visited his sister
in Brookhaven. and Hazlehurst. He
returned to camp Saturday.
Mrs. Leaher Thompson died No
vember 24, at the Charity Hospital
Mrs. Thompson was a member of
the Church of God in Christ. Fun
eral was held at the U. B. Hall,
at 2: P. M. Sunday.
Mr. Willie Lynch left Monday,
November 23, with Mr. Bill Da
vis for Gulfport. He has turned
his business in Terry o^er to his
cousin, Mr. Dick Lynch.
Those at home over the week
end were Messrs Ball Davis, Wil
bert Berry, Rayford Ford, Janies
Smith.
On the sick list this week, Mr.
Will Chrisler, Mrs. Emma Graham.
Mr. Dan Hillard lost two of
his fingers at the Mill this week.
Mr. Johnnie Woods died at Drew
Mississippi, November 19, and was
buried at Oxford. His many friends
of Crystal Springs mourn his pas
sing.
Mrs. Willie Wilson was called
to New Orleans, La., to be with
her daughter Mrs. Virginia Osbor
ne. We hope for her a speedy re
covery.
I
Georgetown News
Mr. Mina Lewis left for Hatties
burg recently to be examined for
induction into the army. On his
furlough, accompained hy his mo
ther, Mrs. Mary Lewis he visited
his grandmother and aunts and o
ther friends in Bogalusa, La. A
supper was given Thursday at the
I home of Mrs. S. T. Lewis in hon
or of Mr. Mina Lewise. Guests of
the affair were: Mr. and Mrs. Lee
Craft, Mr. and Mrs. Cmharil
Craft, Mrs. and Mrs. Charlie Cra
ft and children, Mrs. Emma Haley,
and chillren and his two cousins,
Excell ad Silas Lewis, Mr. and Mrs.
L. D. Murray, Inez Murray, Ceeh
Murray, Jim Brown, Jr., and Sar
ah Lue Brown. We are sorry that
Pvt. Austin Lewis could not be
present, however he was sent a de
licious box. Mr. Mina Lewis left
for Camp Shelby Friday morning,
Mr. and Mrs. S. T. Lewis have two
sons in the army now and Mr. Le
wis was a Cpl in World War No. 1.
An Inexhaustible
Gold Mine
Our farmers need vast quan
tities of nitrogen to grow big
crops. Industry needs huge quanti
ties of nitrogen to produce ex
plosives. Because the army and
navy heed so much nitrogen for
explosives, they are taking part
of the supply that formerly was
used by farmers for growing crops.
But farmers need not be entire
ly dependent on the supply of ni
trogen manufactured in this coun
try or imported from Chile.. Three
fourths of the atmosphere is com
posed of pure nitrogen. There is
enough nitrogen in the air over
each acre to produce 100 bushels
of corn per acre for thousands of
years. This supply of nitrogen is
inexhaustible. Farmers can utili
ze this nitrogen for growing bigger
yields of crops which they can
turn into gold if they want to.
They can draw on this inexhaus
tible gold mine if they want to.
An old man of the California
mountains, standing in the midst
of this romantic region whose gold
set in motion the mightiest migra
tion the world has ever seen and,
which, like a giant magnet drew
the adventurous from the four
corners of the world, remarked
that for every dollars worth of
gold remover from those hUls a
dollar was spent. Some, he said,
got rich. Most didn’t. In fact, most
spent what they already had seek
ing the gold they were never to
find. And yet, day after day, week
after week, and all through the
years the lure of gold and easy
riches drove them empty handed
back to their pans, their gravel
and to the holes in thee hills.
If winter legumes offered the
___ «
same lure to our farmers as the
California hills offered to the gold
hunters, they would find a new so
urce of wealth right on their
farms. If our farmers could be in
spired with the determination and
eternal hope that ischaractedis
tic of the gold hunter, it wouldn’t
be long until the hundreds of acres
that are planted to winter crops
would mount up into the thous
ands for there are riches to be
had his way. There is goold at the
roots of every successful crop of
vetch; there is gold at the roots
of every crop of winter clover. In
planting and turning under these
legumes the farmer does not have
cO worry as to whether or not
ne is going to strike pay dirt. The
land upon which they grow is al
ways pay dirt.
Legumes are the tools which
farmers can use to draw on the
inexhaustible supply of nitrogen
in the air and convert it into
gold. On the roots of all legumes
like vetch, Aust' an peas, and the
clovers are a lot of tiny nodules, or
knots. In the nodules live millions
of bacteria, or nitrogen workers
which take nitrogen from the air
and give it to the plant. And when
these nitrogen rich legumes are
turned under they add precious ni
trogen to the soil, which brings in
creases in crop yields.
During the past four years re
cord on over 1,000 Mississippi
farms showed that a good crop
of winter legumes fertilized with
superphosphate and turned under
in the spring increased the average
yield of lint cotton 216 pounds per
acre and the average yield of com
16 bushels per acre. Valuing the
lint cotton at 20 cents a pound,
this was an increase of $43.20
per acre.
16 Years of Service
To The Public
That’s our Record
Delicious
Home Cooked Food
Courteous Service
SANDWICHES
DRINKS
BEER
WELCOME INN
CAFE
199 Fortification
Lizzie Holly, Prop.
CMPiifJzm.
JflCKSOn, MISS.
Majestis Theatre Four Doors East
Building Of Emporium
We Solve Your
“WHERE TO GO PROBLEM”
“Our Service is the Best,
Our Food is too.
And That Means
We’re Expecting You.”
Always At
STEVENS BAR-B-Q AND CHICKEN INN
“The South’s Finest Food and Service”
STEVENS TOURIST HOME
Clean, Cozy and Comfortable Rooms
STEVENS UMBRELLA GARDEN
An Atmosphere of Southern California
and Florida, Right here in Jackson.
Highway 49 - Pocahontas Road
Phone for Reservation
Tourist Home 3-3186, BarB-Q Inn 4-9265
Henretta Stevens, Prop.
Willie Stevens, Mgr.
CLEANING PRESSING
MIMS CLEANERS
Equipped to Render First Class Service.
406 N. Farish St. Dial 4-9411
NEW LOCATION
Ladies Clothes Given Special Attention At All Times!
WE CALL FOR AND DELIVER
Your Patronage Solicited.
CURTIS MIMS, Prop.
See Our New Line Of
MEN’S WEAR
Shirts, Ties, Socks, Underwear,
Handkerchiefs
Have Your Garments Tailored at
ROGERS TAILOR SHOP
PERFECT FIT GUARANTEED
REGARDLESS OF FORM - CURVES
CROSS ROADS OR CORNERS
A. D. ROGERS, Tailor
524 North Farish Street
Jackson, Mississippi
I
_
-——
“THE TOPS IN DRY CLEANING”
Send Your Cleaning To
MODERN CLEANERS
MRS. GLADYS TOPP, Prop.
1114 Lynch Street Phjne 4-9328
For an Evening of real Pleasure, Drive
Out and Dine a t
GRAVES’ PLACE — Cafe and Grocery
It is a pleasure for us to serve you
Eat Your Dinner With Us
Delicious Food - Reasonable Prices
Free Delivery Phone 4-9379
Lula Graves, Mgr.._Fannin Road
105 E. Capitol St. Jackson, Miss.
^"'>r rJ\y w * ** )\ f- J" l } ‘ , r ;
WHILE IN CANTON VISIT
JOE & LOVIE’S
PLACE
Brightest Spot For Colored
Between Memphis & Jackson
CANTON, MISS.
JOE CATCHINGS, Prop.
331 HICKORY STREET
Visit Your Own
Community Store_
THE VALLEY
GROCERY STORE
Staple and Fancy
Groceries
Fresh Vegetables
and Fruits
Park Washington
Prop.
Here’s Where to Eat—
The best of food and
service for your
money
Breakfast - Lunch
Regular Dinners
Sandwiches of all
Kinds
Bar-B-Cue
MILL & OAKLEY
CAFE
Where Everybody
Eats
Cor. Mill and Oakley
Edward Lee, Prop
Jackson, Miss.
Lookin for a place to
Eat? Visit The_
CORNER EAT SHOP
Dinners.30c
Lunches.20c
Sandwiches of all
kinds
Bar-B-Cue
Our Specialty
“Service with a Smile”
Is Our Motto.
Cor Rose & Lynch Sts.
Jackson, Miss.
FREE!
Famous Lady Esther Silverware
CHINN’S GROCERY STORE
Genuine Silver Plate Guaranteed for
15 Years
Dealer in Staple & Fancy Groceries, Vegetables and
Fruits, Cold Drinks, Tobaccos, Fresh Meats & Poultry.
101 Noel St. Jackson, Miss.
Phone 2-3480
i ———^_
Trade At Your Neibhgorhood Grocery
We Appreciate Your Trade
GULLEDGE GROCERY
Staple and Fancy Groceries
We solicit your business, fair play prices
195 E. Fortification St. Jackson, Miss.
WASHING . . . LUBRICATING
GRIFFITH ST. SERVICE STATION
Jackson, Miss.
FREE ROAD SERVICE
Mill and Griffith Streets
Jack Gregory Dial Number 4-7036
Increase Your Business with music.
Wurlitzer Phonographs on Commission
SERVICE NOVELTY COMPANY
155 E. Pearl Street Dial 2-1822
C. A. Schimpf, Mgr. Jackson, Miss.
PARIS CLEANERS
A Better Cleaning Service
Alterations - Hats
736 N. Farish St Dial 2-0641
Jessie Williams Jackson, Miss.
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