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The Mississippi enterprise. (Jackson, Miss.) 1938-current, April 24, 1943, Image 4

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87065258/1943-04-24/ed-1/seq-4/

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. . » n.—-•
Just Arrived
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I •_ ^ • *
A New Shipment of
| FLAY SHOES j
J All Kinds I
| PRICES: |
i SS®<$<$MSXe<$>® I
! fPOil/MSl:
| l^jTORe for women J j
I
ymra •KX-H yx *!«*•* *M«"S Mitt M *30*,a<i
■ 2
N OTICE! NOTICE! NOTICE!
I A1 Cards of Thanks 50c, and Must Be Paid I
For in Advance! |
I THE MISSISSIPPI ENTERPRISE I
Smith Robertson
Broadcast
Edited and published by Student;
of Smith Robertson Public School.
CURRENT NEWS
In the current issues of activitie;
for this week a check has beer
made on the physical examination;
at the Sallie Harris Clinic. Then
were 70 children examined. Cor
rections will be made before Sep
tember 1.
STAMPS AND BONDS NEWS
It is estimated that niney percen
of all the pupils of Smith Robertsoi
School are buying stamps. Eacl
parent is urged to start a Savin;
for his or her child who has no
already started one.
Health Posters Displayed
At Jackson College. •
There were twenty or more healt]
posters on display, Sunday, Apri
11, at Jackson College, made b
students of Smith Robertson schoo
The Health Poster from the fourt
grade won the first prize. Mis
Elma Slaughter is teacher of thi
grade.
Room Activities
The pupils of the 2nd grade, roor
9, have been very busy makin
Easter Rabbits and Easter baskel
for Easter. The little boys enjoye
their sewing lessons. Miss Eth<
Stewart is teacher of this group.
The fifth grade pupils of room
17 have organized a “Clean Hand
Campaign.” April 19 was the be
ginning date of the campaign and
May 20 will be the closing date.
Mrs. R. L. Wilson is teacher of this
group.
i
There are 300 Victory Garden in
progress at the Smith Robertson
School.
The pupils of the first grade have
been very busy making Easter
i. greetings and Easter baskets. Miss
t Ernestine Randall is teacher of this
, group.
1 '
t The 7th grade pupils have been
very interested in evei'y patriotic
duty that they have been called
upon to do this term. During the
first semester a prize was given to
i this grade for selling the largest
1 amount of stamps. This group re
y ported 100 percent for the Junior
Red Cross. Miss Picola Haley is
t teacher of this group.
s --
s The 7th grade pupils of room 14
are buying Stamps and War Bonds.
This room is also gathering racks
for the soldiers at Flora. Miss Maud
i Brown is teacher of this group.
g -
s The pupils of the 8th grade, sec
i tion A, are very patriotic. Thej
:1 ax*e buying Stamps, Bonds and an
giving coat racks to our boys in
service at Flora. Miss. This group
j are also members of the Junior
j Red Cross. Miss Ida M. Harris is
teacher.
Pupils in room 4 have given a
special study this week of Chapters
27 and 28. St Matthew, and it is
hoped that they have a more ap- !
i preciative feeling for Easter. Dor
i dthy Lindsay brouggit her story
book to class to share with her
j elasMnates. "The Children’s Story
of Jesus.” Easter items and a story
! h..ve been written by each child in
his booklet, titled. “Things I would
like to remember.” Miss Julia
Clark is teaccher of this room.
Who's Who
Scholarship and Deportment List:
According to a list passed to the
editors of The Broadcast, the fol
lowing pupils have been selected
"Who’s Who” for the week, April
20-25.
First Grade: Jessie Latimore,
Theodore Johnson, Will Ray Smith,
Second Grade: Alvin Hall.
Room 2. Alva Varnado, Carrie Wil
liams, Willie Garfield.
2, Alva Varnado, Carrie Williams,
Willie Greenfield.
Third Grade: Ezaree Banres,
Ruth Moffett, Clinton Wright, Mar
tha Berry, Ruth Ellington.
Fourth Grade: Daniel Griffin,
Bobbie Weeks, Esterlen Kent.
Fifth Grade: Jessie Collins,
Cammie Lee Jones. Room 15, Ada
Ruth Gray, Alice Louise Jonhnson.
Room 13, Willie Mae Beck, Alberta
Walls.
SivtVi _ -r-i__
Hazel Moore, Carolyn Bradly, Car
rie Luckett. I
Seventh Grade: (A) Dorothy ,
Parker, Sims Moore, Clayton Hod
ges, Edith Brown. (B) Bertha ,
Johnson, Thelma Bennett, Viola
Williams, Annie Hopson.
Eighth Grade: Grace Weakley,
Mary Moore, Bernice Eliabeth
Coleman, Transella Marley, Alma
Canoge, Dixon Styles, Inez Jones.
Ruby Washington.
Honors Mrs. Patton
April 20, at 9 p. m., a program
was given in honor of Mrs. Lucius
Patton, the former Miss Lula Mae
Hopkins. The mistrees of cere
mony was Grace Bernice Weak
ley. Appropriate musical numbers
were rendered with “You are as
sweet as a Red Rose,” being led by
Mary Lee Moore and dedicated to
Mrs. Patton. Mrs. Patton was
brought to the platform by Inez
Jones and Ruby Lee Washington.
The program was sponsored by the
8th grade class, section B. Mrs. A.
R. Shinault is teacher of this group.
Tattling Tess
Wonder what would happen if
Alma Canonge, Thomasine Tucker,
Bessie Marliey, Mary Field, Mattie
Harper and Thelma Taylor would
stop gossipping? ,
Wonder what would happen if j
Sarah Lee Gray and Eddie Lee Me- ]
xviiiney wouia mane up their minds 1
and get together?
What would happen if Earlean ,
and Nathaniel Williams would get
married?
If Monett Nichols could be sure
that she had the real love of Rob
ert Earl Jones?
Claudia Graves is trying to take
Jerry McGee from Sudie Boston.
Transella looked very attractive
this week in her jitterbug suit.
What would happen if Elnora
Gibson would go down to Terry,
Easter?
On The
Agricultural
Front
Negro FSA Borrowers
Aim at New Record.
The Farm Security Administra
tion announced last week that its
borrowers, white and colored alike,
plan to surpass their 1942 produc
tion record of war essential crops.
The 463,941 family-sized farmers,
including 62,969 Negro farmers,
who have received loans from FSA
believe they can produce enough
addtional milk to meet the require
ments of more than 3,000,000 fight
ing men for a year. Of sourse, only
a small part of their production is
reaching the front. The remaind
: er is consumed right on the farm
to keep the family in working trim
*o that it can make a full contribu
tion to the war effort. Last year
KSA borrowers produced 989.990,
000 gallons of milk, this year they
plan to increase their production to
1.183.850.000 gallons.
They also expect to boost their
pork production to 1,178.0000,000
pounds, the;r chicken output to
224.350.000 pounds and their peanut
crop to 374,000,000 pounds. This
will help a lot toward assuring
full mess plates for our soldiers
and full lunch buckets for our war
workers.
Women’s Land Army
A Women’s Land Army of 60,000
will be recruited and placed as part
of the 3,500,000 workers to be en
rolled in the U. S.‘ Crop Corps to
help meet the farm labor shortage,
the War Food Administration an
nounced last week. Dressed in es
pecially esigned uniforms the
Land Army will make up part of
the 360,000 women who will be en
rolled for farm work. About 10,
000 members of the Land Army are
expected to enroll for year-round
work, the remaining 50,000 for sea
sonal work of one moth or more.
The year-round workers will re
ceive from 3 to 6 weeks’ training in
one of the agricultural short-courses
offered by state agricultural col
leges, similar institutions, or equiv
alent training on the farm. Women
of the Land Army may also work
in farm homes, relieving skilled 1
farm women for work in the fields.
The other 300,000 women workers
who will be recruited along with
:ransported farm workers, business
Tien, and high school youths of
h*» Virtnrv ...:n
ae placed for short-time emergen
cy jobs on farms.
Women \^ho ;can spare week
ends, a few days, or a few weeks
vill enroll in this service to help
vith the job of producing and har
vesting vital war crops.
Recruiting will be done in rural
areas by County Extension agents, j
and in cities by the U. S. Employ
ment Service with the aid of Coun- <
:y Councils of Civilian Defense.
Supervision of the Women’s Land
^rmy will be under Cooperative
Extension Service of the Depart
ment of Agriculture. Enrollees in
:he Land Army must have reached
heir 18th birthday and must fur
aish a dictor's certificate as to their
physical fitness to do farm work.
Distribution Payment on Peanuts
Farmers who produced “excess” ~
or oil peanuts last year and deliv- -
-ied them to designated growers
agencies under the 1942 peanut pro
gram, will receive a distribution
oayment of $10 a ton for those ex
tra peanuts, less outstanding in
debtedness to the Government for
1942 seed. An additional distribu
tion payment is expected to be
available upon completion of the
L942 Peanut Marketing Program.
Payments to farmers will be
made with the approval of Com
modity Credit Corpration by pea
lut growers cooperative associa
ions designated as agencies of the
Secretary of Agriculture for pur
chase and sale of peanuts. These
aama Peanut
agencies are Georgia-Florida- Ala
bama Peanut Association, Cammil
la, Ga.; the Southwestern Peanut
Growers Association, Gorman, Tex
as; and the Growers Peanut Coop
*rtaive, Inc., Franklin, Va. 1
The Department has also an
nounced that there will be no
marketing cards and no "quota” or
‘excess” peanuts this year. Sup
port prices to farmers will average
not less than $140 per ton for Span
ish type peanuts, $140 ped ton for
Virginia types, and $130 per ton for
Runner type.
Steps have been taken by the De
partment to make peanuts availa- '
ble to farmers needing additional '
supplies for seeding the 1943 crop. (
The designated agencies are selling 1
peanuts for seeding at cash prices
ranging from $125 to $155 per ton.
Briefs
“Thomas Jefferson was the fath
er of scientific agriculture in the
United States ... If he lived today,
Jefferson would probably be the
country’s most enthusiastic Victory
Gardener,” declared Secretary of
Agriculture Claude R. Wickard on
the Farm and Home Hour April 9
in commemoration of the 200th an
niversary of Jefferson’s birth.
In canning products from your
Victory Garden the Department
'
recommends the use of a pre* ure
cooker for the canning of non- id
foods such as beans, peas, c< rn,
spinach, other greens, and asp ra
gus. (And while we are on L.’
subject, meats, too.)Acid foods such
as fruits, tomatoes, rhubarb, and
pickled beets may be canned safe
ly by the boiling water-bath meth
od.
Adjustments were made in the milk
marketing economies order last
week by the Department which
removed restrictions on the sale of
milk in less-than-quart-sized con
tainers for consumption in facto
ries, schools, offices, on play
grounds, and in similar places.
However, the sale of milk in less
than-quart-sized containers for
consumption in homes is still re
stricted, except in rural areas, vil
lages and towns of less than 5,000
population. In such areas, the milk
marketing economies order does
not apply.
Fewer peoples are now living on
farms. According to the Bureau of
Agricultural Economics, 27,821,000
persons were living on farms in the
United States on January 1. This
is the smallest number of farm
residents in the entire 33-year pe
riod for which estimates of farm
population are available.
Land values are up. The Bu
reau of Agricultural Economivs re
ports real estate values on Morch
l were sharply higher than on
March 1 a year ago.
» _
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WANTED!
Reliable young lady, with
ability to meet people and
willing to work in a grow
ng business—can obtain
)ffice experience.
Write
D. C. GRIFFIN,
W. Jackson, P. O. Box 2533
Jackson, Miss.
Here’s Amazing
Way to Gain
New Strength
IF YOU frequently feel tired; Inclined
to be nervous and irritable—appetite
poor—this message is intended for you.
A new preparation called Pursin now
supplies iron and precious Vitamin Bt
and G, often found lacking in weak, tired
people—who are suffering from a nutri
tional deficiency of these needed ele-'
ments. You know how important it is to
have a sufficient supply of iron. The vita-1
mins help stimulate appetite and aid di
gestion so you eat more and get more
good from the foods you do eat.
If you are feeling below par Nest we'
four body lacks sufficient iron and Vita
mins Bt and G, do this. Get Pursin from
your druggist today. Take it regularly
and see if it doesn’t help you feel joyftdly
4ert again. A McKesson Product.
Overby’s Drug Store
BRANDON, MISS.
Ilf yen haven’t gotten around
to baying » Second War Loan
Bond, atop and think what it
wonld mean to yon if onr sol
diers hadn’t gotten round to
tho light.
v w w www w <r dVv ir»
WHILE IN CANTON VISIT
Joe & Lovie’s
Place
Brightest Spot For Colored
Between Memphis and
Jackson
JOE CATCHINGS, Prop.
331 Hickory Street
CANTON, MISS.
BE READY FOR
WINTER DRIVING
Drive in for Free
Inspection
“Save Everything’
STARTERS
GENERATORS
IGNITION
Used Cars Bought
and Sold
POLK’S
BATTERY SERVICE
PHONE 3-1234
Jackson, Mississippi
Visit Your Own
Community Store—
VALLEY SANDWICH
SHOP
MEAT MARKET AND
GROCERY STORE
STAPLE AND FANCY
GROCERIES
FRESH VEGETABLES
AND FRUITS
Park Washington, Prop.
VISIT THE
Thee-Way Inn
Cafe and Hotel
Good Food, Comfortable
Rooms
Gas Heat, Pooll Room
Beauty Shop
Expert Beauty Service by
Trained Operators
Grocery & Market
Staple and Fancy Groceries,
Quality Meats
■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■
Phone 223-W
Ernest Washington, Prop.
22 E. Railroad Ave.
Hazlehurst, Miss.
II
Follow The Crowd To
ii
THE BLUE FLAME !
.
' . ; II
THE SWANKIEST CLUB IN JACKSON
WHERE YOU
l
.
Dine and Dance \
' - •: ’ I
i
. I!
' . '■ II
Private Dining Rooms
Phone 4-9195
i1
Fannin Road East Jackson
- • ... ' ; I I
JOE CATCHINGS, Prop.
---:.i .
fmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmrn
| Deflects to pay h.s taxes oa
t time or to invest every cent he
’ can in War Bonds is surely giv* ,
ing aid and comfort to the
•ncmy . , . We have a Job to '
do and we are all called for 1
service to our country. Our
dollars are called to service
too. Let us all ask ourselves,
'Shall we be more tender with
our dollars than with the lives
of our sons?*'' —■ Secretary
^Morgenthau.
--
I Workers in a Michigan re
finery fixed up a very low,
false door leading to the pay
office. On it is inscribed,
"Yon will learn to duck low
er if you don’t Buy a Bond.’*
WHAT WILL YOU HAVE?
Breakfast
Dinner
Lunch
At Every Meal We Have Just
What You Want—
Prepared By A Chef Cook.
Sandwiches - Cold Drinks
Beer
BLACKSTONE
CAFE
W. J. SUMMERS, Prop.
Located Downtown
Jackson
Phone 4-9364
JACKSON, MISS.
——— i —————a
.To Hasten Victory!
F* Ho American wants tills was I
to go one minnte beyond Us
time we can bring it to a rlo* :
tor ions ead. To hasten that ;
victory—to ssve possibly Us
t Uves of millions of onv bsys j
) on our far flog fronts--ft In ,
Imperative that every Amort
can do his part In the Second
J War Loan. There Is an to> j
; vestment to lit every pnrns.
The most yon can do la llttlo
‘ enough compared with tho sac
. rifice offered by oar boys In
service, They give their lives
C—you lend year money* :v' j
We Satisfy
Hungry People ; I
Good Food at Economical
Prices!
■ -”v 1 j
Generous Portion, Friendly
Atmosphere. We can easily
satisfy the biggest of appe
tites, because the prices are
so small. .Dial 4-9271.
COME IN
We Sell War Stamps
SHEPHERD'S
KITCHENETTE
604 North Farish Street
Jackson. Miss.
■ _ t .7 ~rr—^rsaa
m$M :
Company
jflCKSon.Miss ;
229 S. Congress St. Phone 44036
l^BBggggggiggga^S.IE^gffigaiigSgSSSSl^jraSBIgaflMflBfiBBKg^l
VISIT
The Travelers, Home
CLEAN — COMFORTABLE ROOMS
HOT AND COLD WATER
Phone 44646
JOE CATCHINGS, Prop.
WASHING—LUBRICATION
GRIFFITH STREET SERVICE STATION
Jackson, Miss.
FREE ROAD SERVICE
Mill and Griffith Streets
Jack Gregory Dial Number 4-7036
— . .—.. i
1 Ttde FERGUSONS 8% |
FURNITURE — CLOTHING — JEWELRY 1
| All on Credit
Items selling for less than $6.00 may be added
to your account without down payment.
1 FERGUSON FURNITURE CO.
p Dial 3-2678 202 N. Farish St. |
'* . V *

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