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Holmes County herald. (Lexington, Miss.) 1959-current, May 24, 1962, Image 2

Image and text provided by Mississippi Department of Archives and History

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87065333/1962-05-24/ed-1/seq-2/

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Miss Knox Chosen Delelgate
■Dune r aye xvnox, uaugnter
of Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Knox
of Tchula, has been chosen
by the American Legion Auxi
liary and B. & P. W. Club as
their delegate representing
Tchula at Girls’ State June
to • 16th in Jackson. She will
stay at Belhaven College and
will be working for eight days
in the field of citizenship and
government.
Billie Faye was chosen on
the basis of outstanding quali
ties including leadership abi
lity, personality, character,
courage, honesty, scholarship
cooperativeness and the con
tent of her essay entitled,
4‘Why I Wish to Attend Girls’
State.”
Some of her accomplish
ments in school and communi
ty this year are as follows:
Was Queen
^ A junior at Tchula High
School Billie Faye repre
sented her class as queen in
the annual Halloween Carni
val, was in the cast of the
junior play, “Take Your Me
dicine,” was chairman of the
Junior - Senior Banquet com
mittee, co-editor of the “Tchu
la Cheer, the school news
paper, for the junior’s edi
tion, and is leature editor tor
the ensuing year. She was a I
delegate to the State Press
Institute at the University of
Mississippi last month.
She was song leader of the
local FHA chapter, chairman
of the refreshment commit
tee for the annual FHA Dan
ce, elected reporter for next
year? and received the trophy j
as the most outstanding stu- j
dent in home economics this
year.
She is a member of the
band and is a member of the
high school glee club.
She is president of the S
T-C Junior Music Guild, was
selected as a page for the
Mississippi Federation of Mu
sic Clubs’ “Junior Day” in
Jackson, and was presented
by her teacher, Mrs. M. W.
Estes, in her junior piano and
voice recital in March, after
which she assisted a senior
in her piano recital.
Club Work Cited
Billie Faye was elected the
most outstanding 4-Her in the
Tchula Senior Girls’ 4-H Club
of which she is president. She
is secretary of the Holmes
County Program Planning f
Committee, and chairman of i|
four county projects. She ai- I
so serves as secretary of the I
Junior Council, typist for the
4-H County News, and de
votional leader of the Citizen
ship Club. She was a county
winner and received trophies 1
in public speaking and per- I
sonality improvement and I
was second place winner in
song leading. She was a dele
gate to State and Mid-South
Fairs in clothing, a delegate I
to State Club Congress in per- I
sonality improvement in July. |
As a member of the First
Baptist Church of Tchula,
Billie Faye is pianist and as
sistant teacher of the primary
department in Sunday School,
assistant dhurch pianist,
member of the choir and so
loist, a member of the Girls’
Quartette, and pianist for the
Vacation Bible Softool. She
is devotional leader of the
local YWA, song leader of the
Holmes Associational YWA,
speaker at the associational
“M” Night, and a member
of the publicity committee of
the associational Youth Night.
L
Need More
Closet Space?
Why Not Let
Us Clean
And Store
Those Winter
Clothes!
Your Clothes Will Be Protected In
Our Air-Conditioned Storage
Facilities. They Will Be Fully Insured!
SUNSHINE
CLEANERS
When Clothes Are Dirty
Call Two Thirty"
LEXINGTON, MISS.
County
Agent
By W. R. Sullivan,
Pastures —
Due to dry^ hot weather
during the past four weeks,
our pastures are becoming
, dry and the grass tough. If
at all possible rotate your
grazing when thg grasses are
getting too short so they will
come back quicker after you
get a rain. Also, it would be
advisable to nitrate grass pas
tures so thjfct as soon as
rains occur the pasture will
come back to good grazing
much quicker than they would
if no nitrogen is available.
Use 40 - 50 units of nitrogen
per acre on grass pastures.
Wild Barley Heads —
If your pasture is contami
nated with dry wild barley it
would be advisable to clip the
heads of wild barley so that
your cows can get better
grazing. The wild barley
heads get in the eyes of cows
and also stick into the gums
and roof of mouth of animals
which can cause considerable
trouble if too much wild bar
ley is in the pasture.
Sudan and Millet —.
In order to help supplement
your short pasture if you
have the land available to
where cows can be grazed
then it would be wise to pre
pare and plant Sudan or mil
let as soon as possible. These
areas can be grazed in 4 to 6
weeks after planting if you
have the moisture to bring up
your millet or Sudan. But it is
useless to prepare land and
piani suuan or millet unless
you fertilize the area well.
Lse 50 - 60 units of nitrogen
per acre when planting Sudan
or millet. After the millet or
Sudan has reached 12 to 15
inches in height it may be
grazed off down to 2 or 3 in
ches. Then remove your live
stock and allow it to come
back for second grazing or to
be cut for hay if you do not
need it for grazing.
Side Ihess Corn —
In side dressing corn use
plenty of nitrogen. Side dres
sing makes for better nitrogen
use as it reduces loss of lea
ching. Side dress when corn
is knee high with 60 - 80 units
of nitrogen per acre. Corn
uses around % of the total nit
rogen from 2 weeks before
tasseling until maturity.
Social Security —.
From'now until June 30 is
Round-Up Time” at your So
cial Security office. The round
-up is for disabled workers
who have been disabled for
several years and not filed
application for social security
benefits.
Farmers and farm workers
who have been disabled for
several years and who delay
£e r*PPlications bey°nd June
30, 1962, may lose all rights
to present and future benefits
for themselves and depend
ents. For more information
on this, contact the nearest
social security office.
To The People Of The New Second District Of Mississippi
It is unfortunate that the State of Missis
sippi has lost one Congressional District, result
ing in consolidation of the old Second and Third
Districts and causing a contest between col
leagues to determine who will represent the
new Second District in Congress.
However, this is the situation and the voters
of the new district will go to the polls on June
5 to make their choice. That choice should not
be difficult, for there is a wide, fundamental
difference in the philosophies of these men, as
well as in their seniority, power and prestige,
and their accomplishments for the people of
Mississippi:
JAMIE WHITTEN has served the Second
District for almost 21 years; Frank Smith has
served for almost 12 years.
JAMIE WHITTEN is on the committee
which appropriates funds (without which
authorizations mean nothing) and is Chairman
of the powerful Agricultural Appropriations
Subcommittee which must renew all agricul
tural acts every year by providing funds;
Frank Smith is on a committee which au
thorizes.
(It is pointed out that most of the flood con
trol and drainage projects now being credited
to Frank Smith were, in fact, authorized by
the Flood Control Act of 1936, as amended by
the Acts of 1937, 1941, 1944 and 1946 — all
several years before Frank Smith’s election to
Congress. Since then it has been a matter of
providing funds.)
According to the Congressional Quarterly,
Jamie Whitten voted with the Southern ma
jority on 25 of 26 important bills in 1961;
Frank Smith voted with the South only 14
times. Frank Smith supports Foreign Aid, the
only member of the Mississippi delegation —
House or Senate — who does so. Jamie Whitten
5s opposed to this country’s wasteful Foreign
ikid Program. He feels that we have not only
spent $84.8 billion, inflated our currency,
(depleted our gold supply, and reduced the value
r©f the savings of our people, but by injecting
ourselves into the internal affairs of foreign
nations we have created for ourselves a really
(dangerous situation.
f There is a significant difference in the basic
philosophies of Congressmen Smith and Whit
ten, as their voting records clearly indicate.
The following are several instances where
Smith differed not only with Whitten, but with
the entire Mississippi delegation:
HOW YOUR CONGRESSMEN VOTED
FOREIGN AID
In commenting on this bill, Congressman James Harvey of Michigan stated
“When the Foreign Aid Bill, H.R. 8400. passed the House, Section 619 (a) of the
House Amendments specifically provided that no assistance should be furnished to
any country or area dominated by the international Communist conspiracy, and
some 17 countries, including Yugoslavia and Poland, were enumerated . . . The
language, in the bill as it now reads leaves the determination of furnishing aid to
Communist countries to the President. Under the State Department views, we can
expect aid to continue to Yugoslavia and Poland, both Communist countries.”
In essence, this bill grants control of Foreign Aid to the Executive branch,
and allows it to commit us to fanciful “give-away” programs as it sees fit.
PEACE CORPS
Congressman August E. Johansen commented in connection with this bill:
“I am completely opposed to it. I believe that it represents a mistaken effort to
secularize and socialize the type of humanitarian activity abroad lone and success
fully promoted by missionary movements and non-governmental philanthropists.
In my opinion, the Peace Corps will prove the bureaucrats’ dream and the tax
payers’ nightmare . . . There can be no question that the Peace Corps, if per
Jetuated by the Congress, will be an ideal target for penetration and infiltration
y members of the Communist conspiracy.”
SUPPLEMENTAL APPROPRIATIONS
(Including Congo)
Among other items, this bill included $32 million as a supplemental appro
priation to the State Department to donate to the United Nations to meet a
special assessment for misguided U.N. Congo operations. Why was this special
assessment necessary? — because the Communist bloc countries refused to pay
their part of the bill. Indeed, why should they, when they can get us to do it? ...
We were already financing many of the Communist activities around the world
through this organization.
TRAVEL & TOURISM
This bill put the Federal Government in direct competition with privately
owned airlines, steamship companies, travel agencies and others in the field of
tourism.
...-'***,
INCREASE IN DEBT CEILING
Proposal to increase the debt limit by $13 billion, thus making a “temporary''
limit of $298 billion. This will not be temporary, as the history of this kind of
thing clearly shows, because the Big Spenders will continue deficit spending and
ask that we pick up the tab. The effect of this is to lower the purchasing power
of your dollar and increase taxes in later years. ■
For Against
WHITTEN □ (x)
ABERNETHY □ (x|
COLMER □ [x]
WILLIAMS [7] Pg Not votina
WINSTEAD □ pg
SMITH [x| □ '
For Against
WHITTEN □ |x]
ABERNETHY □ 0
COLMER □ pg
WILLIAMS □ Pel
WINSTEAD □ pg
smith pg □
WHITTEN A90,nSt
ABERNETHY
wInstead
SMITH
•lit*’.
WHITTEN A9|5gSt
ABERNETHY p<
COLMER Not voting
WILLIAMS [X
WINSTEAD Not voting
SMITH □

WHITTEN
ABERNETHY
COLMER Not voting
WILLIAMS
WINSTEAD
KEEP JAMIE WHITTEN IN CONGRESS-VOTE JUNE 5TH
A Paid Political Advertisement Approve By Sale Lilly, Campaign Manager

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