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Okolona messenger. (Okolona, Miss.) 1900-current, June 12, 1907, Image 2

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87065462/1907-06-12/ed-1/seq-2/

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IN OCEAN'S GREATE8T DEPTHS.
ms so:
FEB AND
KEPT OPEN
Pressure of Water That Would De
stroy a Battleship.
More than half the surface of the
globe Is hidden under water two miles
deep; 7,000,000 square miles lie at a
depth of 18,000 feat or more. Many
places have been found five miles
and more in depth. The greatest depth
yet sounded Is 31,200 feet, near the Is
land of Guam. If Mount Everest, the
world's highest mountain, were pluck
ed from Its seat and dropped Into
this spot the waves would still roll
2,000 feet above its crest. Into this
terrific abyss the waters press down
with a force of more than 10,000
pounds to the square Inch. The
staunchest ship ever built would be
crippled under this awful pressure
like an eggshell under a steam roller.
A pine beam, 15 feet long, which held
open the mouth of a trawl used in
making a cast at a depth of more
than 18,000 feet, was crushed flat as
if it had been passed between roll
ers. The body of the man who should
attempt to venture to such depths
would be compressed until the flesh
was forced Into the Interstices of the
bone and his trunk was no larger than
a rolling pin. Still, the body would
reach the bottom, for anything that
will sink in a tub of water will sink
to the uttermost depths of the ocean.
Eugene Wllloughby in The Oceari.
THE TALE OF A FISH.
As Related to His Friends by the
Veracious Jenkins.
They had been discussing fish and
fishing, when Jenkins suddenly added:
"Did I ever tell you about Pitti Sing,
my pet Japanese fan-tailed goldfish?
Bought her from Jake Hope for $45,
and she is no longer than your finger.
But about her intelligence. Of course,
she comes when called and eats out of
your hand and all that childish non
sense; but here's a thing she did
which Indicates thought, reasoning,
brainwork. One day a candlestick fell
from the mantel on to the thick glass
bowl in which Pitti Sing was dream
ing. The candlestick cracked the
bowl and knocked a small hole in it.
Pitti Sing, all alone In the drawing
room, saw the water that was essen
tial to her existence flowing through
the hole, and what do you think she
did? She plugged up the leak with
her tail, and in that position I found
her on my return an hour or so later.
She had saved her life, but the end of
her tail, from exposure to the air, was
all shriveled and cracked. I had to
massage It with cold cream before the
poor little thing could swim again."
There was painful silence for a few
minutes; then when Dumply said It
looked like rain everybody but Jen
kins followed him out.
Smoked In Church.
Although the present universal
habit of smoking is of comparatively
recent date, the use of -tobacco was
carried to a great excess when it
was first introduced. Our ancestors
smoked even in church. All such of
fenders were solemnly excommuni
cated, by Urban VIII. in 1624. and
again by Innocence XII. In 1690,
when the practice seems to have ex
tended to Rome Itself. There was
William Breedon, too, vicar of Thorn
ton, "a profound divine, and absolute
ly the most polite person for-nativl-tles
In that age," of whom the astrolo
ger Lilly says that "when he had no
tobacco he would cut the bell ropes
and smoke them." ' ,
Ancient "Cure" for Madness.
In the "Dlctionarium Domestlcum,
Being a New and Compleat Household
Dictionary for the Use Both of City
and Country" (1736), is this sure cure
for a malady which has in modern
times been regarded as rather ob
stinate: "For lunacy and madness
Boil three large handfuls of ground
Ivy, shred small.-in two quarts of wine
till there Is but one-third part remain
ing; then strain it and add to it six
ounces of the best salad oil; boll it up
to an ointment, shave the patient's
head, warm the ointment and chafe his
head with it. This is Dr. Wadenfleld's
remedy, with which a person is grid
to have cured 60 lunatlck persons."
Sport of the Infant Japanese Girl.
Little girls make a play of one
thing that in after years becomes la
bor, labor of love though It is. So
soon as a girl Is old enough, pe.haps
three or four, her dolly is tied to her
back in the same way that she was
fastened to her nurse's back when she
was a baby. She carries this about
while at play, and as she grows older
a larger doll is used until she has
grown accustomed to the weight and
Is able to carry her baby brother or sis
ter, thus relieving her mother, who
perhaps works in the rice fields or in
a tea garden. Laura B. Starr, in the
Circle.
Siamese Object to Walking.
The Siamese, above all nations In
the world, hate to walk; no such mode
of progression is tolerated by a Siam
ese if he or she can by any means
ride. A Venetian gondolier will walk
sometimes; even a Hollander will ride
on bis rough cart; but a Bangkok man
-not if he can help ltd. His family
; boat for him.-r Windsor Magazine.
Hit Classification.
"Oh, I don't intend to be scrupulous
about the way I get on," said the
young lawyer, who thought himself
the greatest ever. ' "I frankly Intend
to rent out my head to anybody who
"wants to make use of it." "Then, if
you advertise It," replied his cynical
friend,, "they'll put you under the
Iipudirg of Empty Flat."
BYvIMPUmTIES Iff TIIE BLOOD
Whenever a sore refuses to heal it is because the blood is hot pure and
healthy, as it Bhould be, but is infected with poisonous germs or some old
blood taint which has corrupted and polluted the circulation. .Those most
usually afflicted "with old sores are persons who have reached or passed mid
dle life. The vitality of the blood and strength of the system have naturally
begun to decline, and the poisonous germs which have accumulated because
of a sluggish and inactive condition ol the system, or some hereditary taint
which has hitherto been held iu check, now force an outlet on the face; arms,
legs or other part of the body. The place grows red and angry, festers and
eats into the surrounding tissue until it becomes a chronic and stubborn
uleer, fed and kept open by the impurities with which the blood is saturated.
Nothing is more trying and disagreeable than a stubborn, nonhealing sore.
The very fact that it resists ordinary remedies and treatments is good reason
for suspicion; the same germ-producing canefcrous ulcers is .back of every
old sore, and especially is this true if the trouble is an inherited one.
Washes, salves, nor indeed anything else, applied directly to the sore, can
do any permanent good; neither will remov-
ffr0.TiJh.tVXg-?BK ing the sore with caustic plasters or the
wm tmau pimple at first but it surgeon's knife make a lasting cure. If
E.7 .7 T7ol"l every particle of the diseased flesh were
alarmed about it and consulted taken away another sore would come, be
;iP.Wtn:oreria.li cause the trouble is in the blood, and the
to arrow worw. IaawS.8. 8. ad- BLOOD CANNOT BE CUT AWAY,
UMrVekiSn w'htiiV The cure must come by a thorough cWns-
completely cured. My blood la ing of the blood, in 53. o. S; win De jouna
teZWtS. e?,Vdthyeha. not a remedy for sores and ulcers of every kind.
been. t alirn of the aoro alnoo TV ia an linennallpil hlrxvl THirifir one that
8. S. 8. cure.
Watt Union, Ohio.
ig-n or tna aora amoo it 19 an uneaualled biooa tmnner-
,1.'MntT.. ;Mf 4-1, a :n.,i1ofinM still I
promptly cleanses it of all poisons and
taints. It gets down to the very bottom of
the trouble and forces out every trace of im
purity and makes a complete and lasting
cure. S. S. S. changes the quality of the
blood so that instead of feeding the diseased
PIIRPI V ' VFRFTARI F parts with impurities, it nourishes the
rUHLLT VLULIADLC fritat lnJiamrf flesh keaithy blood.
Then the sore begins to heal, new flesh is formed, all pain and inflammation
leaves, the place scabs over, and when S. 8. S. has purified the blood the
sore is permanently cured. S. S. S. is for sale at all first class drug stores.
Write for our special book on sores and ulcers and any other medical advice
you desire. We make no charge for the book or advice.
TH SWIFT SPECIFIC CO., ATLANTA, CAm
X
I
"GET THE FIRST $1,000.'
Ancient Axiom That Has Set Many
4 Men to Saving.
"Get the first $1,00!). After that
money-making is easy." This is the
oM-Ume sage advice of the hard-head
ed, self-made man. That axiom ha
set many men to saving. They fix
upon that sum as the glittering, far-
off herald of a fortune something to
be made. To a man on -a small salary
a salary, say, out of which some
thin? can be saved weekly without too
much deprivation the advice is good.
There is something in it that acts ast
a stimulus to economy. And who
will deny that economy is a good
thing or that any truth that lights
the way to it should not be known?
Many men, therefore, have been
buoyed up in their economies by the
belief that the first $1,000 is the hard
est to get, and that afterward all the
rest would be easy and the good
things of tho world that follow a boun
teous supply of money would be with
in easy reach, says' a writer in the
Denver Republican. It is a pity that
the man who invented that saying
could not also have told us wita
equal advantage how to turn the $1,009
over and make two of it. It takes a
long time to make a wage-earner see
that "money works." His idea of mak
ing money is to work for it himself.
It never occurs to him that money
works much easier than he can and
without any of the hardships he
himself experiences that is to say,
until he has got the first $1,000.
That usually makeB a young man feel
like a financier, and he talks wisely
of investments.
STYLES OF 4,000 YEARS AGO.
Tend to Prove There Is Nothing New
Under the Sun.
For women archeology assumes a
deeply Interesting phase in the ques
tion which has been raised by Signor
Mosso as to styles In dress as they
existed 4,000 years ago. Signor Mos
so, the eminent authority on ancient
Etrurla, the Roman Forum, and early
Crete, has concentrated his great ex
perience and knowledge on elucidat
ing this bypath of science from his
Cretan studies. The general result
has been to confirm the old dictum
that there is nothing new under the
sun. Even the "latest fashions" are
antiquated. Signor Mosso finds that
4,000 years ago the ladles of primeval
Mycenae wore hats pretty much as
they are seen in the showrooms of
Paris to-day. They knew what crape
trimming was, had tartans before the
Scotch, understood the mysteries of
corsets lacing In front, short wide
sleeves, metal belts, and a style' of
dress which an imitative nineteenth
century, that considered Itself orig
inal, dubbed "Empire." Their prin
cipal colors in robes were orange,
yellow, blue and purple, which rather
upsets the claim of the Phoenicians to
have "discovered" purple.
Properties of Gold.
Pure gold Is unaffected by the at
mosphere either at ordinary tempera
tures or when the metal is heated. It
is also proof against the action of
common acids when used singly.
Moreover, says the Jewelers' Circular
Weekly, it confers its properties more
or less upon copper and silver when
these metals are alloyed ' with It.
Thus, for example, 12, karajt gold will
withstand the action of nitric acid and
the atmosphere at ordinary tempera
ture, but some of the copper will be
oxidized during annealing. Nine parts
of gold may be alloyed with ten parts
of platinum In an ordinary crucible
and fire, but such an alloy will not be
uniform; a large proportion of plat
inum will free Itself from the gold on
solidification and a homogeneous alloy
of the two metals cannot be obtained.
The Cravt of Goldsmith.
That Oliver Goldsmith was burled In
tbS,. church&ard. of the Temple has
been placed Deyona aoutot by the entry
in the register. But the:stone on the
north side of the Temple church,
around which the enthusiasts of the
Goldsmith club gather, has been placed
on a spot purely conjectural, for the
exact position of the grave has never
been discovered. -The real site was
remembered as late as 18?0. In that
year the sexton, a very aged man, who
apparently was present at the burial,
still venerated an elder tree, which,
he said, marked the site of Gold
smith's grave. This elder tree seems
to have stood a few feet south of the
present stone, near the old vestry.
Westminster Gazette. , .
The Charming Woman.
Of all the women born into an un
grateful and unappreclailve world none
can compare to the really charming
one. We may admire the beauty and
gaze in awe at the bluestocking, hug
the "dear things of our acquaintance"
and thump the "good, sort" on the
back, but in the presence of a person
ality which "charms" us we remain
in' speechless and almost breathless
fascination. Truly of every such
woman can It be said which was said
by St. Simon of one- or 'the most fas
cinating women of his time, that she
walks "like a goddess on the clouds."
L'luconnue.
Liliiaini Nordica
After a thorough trial of her piano: "The more I use my
KIMBALL piano the better I like it."
We have several Hundred similar testi-
monials on file. Come in and see them
''1 .;.
hi
! P. D. LAWRASON.
Tupelo, Miss.
' Everything in Music.
a E A T S 1
'ft""""""'
(IV
Phone No. 11, tti
that won't make you
lose your religion to
eat them. Roasts,
Steaks, Chops, Etc.
Try us this month.
Whiteside's
Hi
if
PURE LEAF TOBACCO
Besides the heavy war tax on store tobacco, the Infernal trusts
now taa you to death. Now if yon want to smoke or cbew pure
leaf tobacco free and untaxed and save your dimes these hard
time and help a brother Populist who has dared much to de
fend and propagate the Immortal principles of the People's party,
write for price on leaf tobacco of my own raising. Address
RuraiR.No. i Wm. L. Parks. Adams, Tenn.
The Mesbengeb uses no other tobacco and can voncb for its
character as the highest.
Okolona Professional & Business Men.
PROFESSIONAL MEN .
BUCHANAN & BUCHANAN
A TTOKNBY AT LAW, Office next door to
J the Okolona Banking Company, Okolo
do. Hiss. Practices in Federal and State
courts.
DRY 800DS AMD CLOTHING.
Tact. -The
right kind of a wife never harps
upon her husband's misdeeds, still lest
does she remind him of his misfor
tunes. No woman' should marry a
man unless her love for him be of the
fiber which hopeth all things, belleveth
all things, and is not easily provoked,"
says Home Chat The right kind of
wife helps a man when he falls an en
courages him -to try again, Instead of
railing at him for the stumble after h
has risen to his feet.
QUALITIES OF THE OYSTER.
One Particularly Good Point Which
Bore Might Emulate.
A San Franciscan has discovered a
new method of cutting short recitals
that promise to become too long-wind
ed.. An acquaintance of .his, who has
a local reputation as a bore, was one
day holding forth at : some ; length
when the Californlan Interrupted him
with: "By the way, did I ever tell you
the story of the oyster ?V On, receiv
ing a negative reply, he continued: "It
seems that when oysters, are taken
from the sea they often open their
shells sq that the Juice or liquid runs
out. As this Is undesirable, the ex
perienced oyster gatherer has a tub
of water close at hand into which the
oyster is plunged as soon as it begins
to open its shell." "Well, and what
then?" asked the other as the narrator
paused. The San Franciscan Bmiled.
"Oh, after a while the oyster learns to
keep its mouth shut,'! he remarked
quietly. ' .. r ,- ., :
Great Slaughter of Salmon
Iu the Sea of Okotsk the salmon are
suicidal and one of the most start
ling examples of the spendthrift side
of nature may be found in the rivers
that run into this sea. .When six years
pld the salmon begin , voyage , of
death. Ascending the river, of their
Infancy they race in countless thou
sands upstream until lack of food and
lack of elbow room kill them' off. A
recent traveler declares that, however
many millions of salmon may run up
the river, not one ever reaches the
sea again alive. ,What ,becomes of
the rivers of dead salmon? The sea
gulls wheel down upon the scene and
feast upon their eyes, scorning any
thing less dainty, pears, wolves,
foxes and Bledge dogs are made com
fortable for the year.
E. S. ELLIOTT iu SON
DRY GOODS. Clothing, Boots and Bhoes
Hats. etc. Our prices, Quality of goodc
considered, are the lowest tn the city. By fall
oeallng and honest business methods, we al
ways rely on ooiUlnK a customer wb( n he bat
once favored us with his trade. Okona.
Cures Tetter,
Eczema, Itch (all
kinds) Dew Poison,
dimples, Ring
worm, Skin ,
Eruptions, Chap
ped Facea and
Hands, Sore,
Sweatty, Swollen,
Blistered Feet
Cotton Pickers
Pick J4
More
Cotton by
Using It
For sale by
DONT 5CRATCH
HOpPEKSTtTTER
i iftAU5KIN
' M FMAND
SCALP
TROUBLES
DEATH TO
RED BUG
SURECURE
Davis & Bell
I I
PLUNK'S RESTAURANT
JUST THE PLACE to stop in, going to or from the train,
or when in town from the country, and get a quick Innch
or a Rqoare metl. EverytbioK in season and served with
neatness, cleanliness and dispatch.
Short Orders, Day or Night
We have installed a gasoline engine to run onr fans daring
the summer and can assure you of a cool place to eat your
meals. Try ns once 1
J. T. Plunk, Prop-
IS
m
wm
m
The original
LAXATIVE r"'
It is freely predicted that pies will
be thinner this year than usual on ac
count of the shortage of crops.
, ..... .
When you see a fiirl -eating green
onions it is pretty sure sign that she
has no love affairs lo worry 1 c.
For coughs,- col-da, tnroat and lung
troubles. No opiates. Non-alcohollo.
Good for everybody. Sold everywhere,
I Tho genuine ?
FOLEY'S HONEY end TAR lata
a Yellow package. Refuse substitutes
Prepared only by
Foley A. Company, Chlo -
. . f St. Clair Drnar Co. Tnpelo,
a y and Bearden & King Okoloba
'The lazy man likes busy times. Tis
then that he can enjoy himself watch
ing othef "people work.
A man who is in perfect health, so he
can do an honest day s work when nee
essarv. has much for which he should
be thankful. Mr. L Q Rodgers, of
Branchton, Pa., writes that he was not
only unable' to work, but he couldnt
stooD over to tie his own snoes. oix
bottles of Foley's Kidney Cure made a
new man of him. He soys, "Success to
Foley s Kidney Cure.
Sold by Bearden & King, Okolona,
and St. Clair Drug Co., Tupelo.
Si 0 Q c; i S
for general use. Is flre-resistinir and water-proof. Has been in nse
17 years on the Kin Hardware Bailding, New Alhuny, MUs., and good
yet. Southern Railroad Company uses 15 exclusively, Reaper than
shingles, better than iron.
Also handle
NEW ERA PAINTS AND VARNISHES
ACME QUALITY, made by Acme White Lead and Color Work?,
. De'roit, Michigan.
The Best is the Cheapest.
IUIMS & IIODG
ES
Cured Hemorrhages of the
JjUIJgS
'Soveral UAra Bm IYIV IllflffS Were
fe.V,.M. J w ' - - J V
so badly affected that I had many hem
orrhages," writes A. M. Ake, of : Wood,
Ind. I took treatment with several
physicians without any benefit, I then
started to take roley s Money and 1 ar,
and my lungs are now as sound as a
builet I recommend it in advanced
stages of lung trouble." Foley's Honey
and Tar stops the cough and heals the
lungs, and prevents serious results trom
a cold. Refuse substitutes.
Sold by Bearden-& King, Okolona,
and St. Clair Drug Co., Tupelo.
An Ohio woman has been arrested
because she refuses to talk. A woman
who keeps her suspicions to herself
deserves to be arrested.
I.
1 We pay the highest market price )
Old Iron
I Old Brass
.V-EtC;
Bring it to us. It will be just
that much clear money. .
t
J Hawkins & Hodges
What a rare chance June ha
making a wonderful record.
W -W"W m r m ' mT m w w w s nr
f.
o.,
f I :
c' I
t ):
"
i
I i,
Hie effect of Scott's Emulsion cn l!.:r,
pais children is raaicaL .
It makes them plump, rosy, active, hs?
w 4
It contains Cctl Liver CI!, HypcL: .
'' and Glycerine, to rna!;2 fat, V. :. cr 1 I ?: - f
and $o put together t!;?.t itts cz.C,j
.ALL-DRUGGISTS I EOa. ''AND' fl.OO,
A m i n , m. rt - ." f'"- ' " ;
W w w
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