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Oxford eagle. (Oxford, Lafayette Co., Miss.) 1876-current, April 06, 1922, Image 4

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OXFORD EAGLE
Entered at the Posrtoffice at Oxford
Miss., as second-class matter.
fcEORGE W. PRICE, Editor and Pat
~ Published Every Thursday
Lafayette County Press and Oxfor<
Eagle consolidated August 24, 1915
absorbed The Independent July 1,1911
dficial Organ Lafayette County am
City of Oxford.
Foreign Advertising Representative
TUP VMFR'OAN prfss association
All obituary notices and cards oi
thanks are charged for at the rate oi
one cent per word, and must be paic
in advance in all cases.
Sample Copies 5 Cents Eech—Norn
_Free.
Advertising rates, 33 1-3 Cents pei
Inch for display; 1 cent per word foi
classified but no classified ad taker
for less than 25 cents; 10 cents pei
_line for readers.
Oxford Eagle Subsriptioon Rates.
>ne year, in advance.$2.0C
•lix months, in advance. 1.00
Three months, in advance.50
Outside U. S. one year. 2.50
Subscriptions Are PayaMe in Advance
in All Cases.
No free copies; no papers sent on
credit to anyone.
Telephone 108
ANNOUNCEMENTS.
The Eagle is authorized to an
nounce A. C. Anderson of Ripley,
as candidate for Congress from the
Second Congressional District of
Mississippi, subject to the action of
the Democratic primary election.
THE PLUMB LINE
OF REASON.
(Editorial from Chicago (III.) Jour
nal of Commerce, April 1, 1922.)
Glenn E. Plumb, who styles him
self general counsel of the Organiz
ed Railway Employes of America,
made a speech in St. Louis recently.
Among other things, he charged the
railroads with being bankrupted and
in such condition of disrepair as to
be unsafe to ride upon. The rail
roads are not bankrupted, but Mr.
Plumb is trying as hard as he can to
bring about that condition.
While Mr. Plumb has been fortu
nate in inducing most of the railway
employe organizations to furnish
him with financial backing with
wrhich to wage a war against the
railway companies, he has been ex
tremely unfortunate in having the
props knocked out from under
charges which he has made against
private operation of the railroads.
He seems to have been very unlucky
in the particular railway topics which
he has selected to discuss before the
public. For example, the statement
which he made at St. Louis to the
effect that the railroads are in such
a condition of disrepair as to be un
safe to ride upon is about as wide of
the mark as any statement could
be.
In another part oi tnis issue oi me
Chicago Journal of Commerce there
appears a statement *by the Illinois
Central Railroad System over the
signature of President Charles H.
Markham wherein die official figures
of the Interstate Commerce Commis
sion are given. They show that
there were fewer fatalities on the
railroads in 1920 than there have
been in any year in the last twenty
two years, and that during 1920 the
railroads carried the heaviest traf
fic in their history. It is explained
that the figures on the number of
fatalities in the United States for
1921 are not yet available, but that
on the Illinois Central System in
1921 there was the smallest number
of fatalities that have occurred in
any year in twenty-four years.
“We believe the public will agree
with*us that the handling of a heav
ier business with a smaller numbei
of fatalities is a barometer of rail
way efficiency," declares Mr. Mark
ham.
Mr. Markham is right. A gooc
way to study the railroads is to take
one branch of the subject at a time
such as the prevention of accidents
and analyze it. A good many have
been doing that and in nearly everj
instance private management of the
railways has been found to be no
only sound but to possess such merii
as • to deserve special commendation
The fact that there are nearly twice
as many people fatally injured eacl
year by ordinary falls as are fatall;
injured on our railroads is remark
able. Ordinary bums kill more an
nually tahn are fatally injured oi
the railroads, and even accidents
drowning is running the railroads i
close second on fatalities.
In the face of the official figures
Mr. Plumb's charge that the rail
roads are unsafe to ride upon i
plainly too nonsensical for foolish
ness. But so long as Mr. Plum
can fool the leaders of organize
labor, and they, in turn, can pull th
wool over the eyes of the men wh
pay dues and assessments to the oi
ganizations, Mr. Plumb will no
worry. A subject on which no ligh
has been thrown, and probably non
will be thrown, is how much mone
Mr. Plumb is making out of hi
campaign of misrepresentation.
; CWt\\ "KoUs Commas
Mra. A. F. Calloway.
Blessed is the nation whose
God is the Lord; and the people
| whom he hath chosen for his
j own inheritance.—Psalm 33; 12.
PRESIDENT RAPS DISREGARD
FOR LAW AND DIS
CUSSES LAX MORALS
I -
In liis address before the Bible
j Class at the Calvary Baptist Church,
Washington, D. C., recently, Presi
dent Harding discussed lax morals
and depolred the tendency to a light
er view of religion, and urged the
church to use its influence for bet
ter conditions, spiritual, mental and
moral. Ha paid his respects to the
“Invisible Empire." He said in
part:
“The church can render no higher
service at this time than .to put
forth its utmost influence in behalf
of frank and willing obedience to
the law of the land. We must
nevertheless recognize that the e is
a very apparent tendency to a light
er and more frivolous view of the
citizen’s relations to both the state
and the church. If people who are
known as leaders, became known for
their defiance of some law, they
need not be astonished if their ex
ample is followed by others.
“There has come to me no other
such unwelcome impression as the
manifest religious intolerance which
, exists among many of our citizens,
j I hold it to be a menace to the very
liberties we boast and cherish.
“If I were to utter a prayer for
this Republic tonight, it would be to
reconsecrate us, in religious devotion
and make us abidingly a God-fear
ing, God-loving people,
j “There is no relationship here be
tween Church and State. Religious
liberty has its unalterable place,
along with civil and human liberty,
in the very foundation of the Re
public. There is shown the far-see
ing vision of the immortal founders,
and we are a better people and a
better republic because there is that
freedom.
“I fear it is forgotten sometimes.
In the experiences of a year in the
' presidency, there has come to me no
'other such unwelcome impression as
the manifest religious intolerance
i • . _ __
which exists among many of our
| citizens, I hold it to be a menace to
the very liberties we boast and
cherish.
“In spite of our complete divorce
ment of Church and State, quite in
j harmony? with our religious freedom,
there is an important relationship
I between church and nation, because
Jno nation can prosper, no nation can
! survive, if it ever forgets Almighty
God.
“I have believed that religious
reverence has played a very influen
tial and helpful art in the matchless
American achievement, and I wish it
'ever to abide. If I were to utter a
'prayer for the republic tonight, it
would be to reconsecrate us in re
ligious devotion, and make us abid
ingly a God-fearing, God-loving peo
ple.
“I do not fail to recall that the
religious life makes for the simple
life, and it would be like a divine
benediction to restore the simpler
life in this republic.
“There is a good deal of loose
talk nowadays about the cause of
the spiritual demoralization of the
community, which it has become
popular to attribute to the abnormal
conditions that were incident to the
war. But, in fact, the war is not
wholly to blame. Before the war
started or was dreamed of, we were
already realizing the tendency to
ward a certain moral laxity, a shift
ing of standards, a weakening of the
sterner fibers. I think we should do
well to recognize that intellectual
and moral evolution of the corn*
munity. It would be a grievous er
ror to allow ourselves to feel too
confident that this is only a tempo
rary and passing aspect.
“Take, for example, the matter
of regard for the law. Without giv
j ing too much weight to alarmist ex
! pressions, we must, nevertheless,
! recognize that there is a very ap
parent tendency to a lighter and a
more frivolous view of the citizen’s
relations to both the State and the
Church. We can hardly hope for a
restoration of the old ideals in re
; ligion and in moral conduct. So
long as this tendency to disregard
for the law shall cnotinue, it is ab
solutely essential to the maintenance
of a secure society and to the attain
ment of a proper moral plane, that
the law should be recognized as
sacred and supreme. It should have
at its back, and enlisted in its sup
port, every element of the com
munity that realizes the desirability
of sound, secure and stable institu
tions. Disregard of one statute in
evitably must breed a lack of res
pect for the law in general. This
tendency is obvious, and ought to
give the deepest concern to people
who have seen, in this world, the
fearful results that flow from this
breakdown of respect for the social
fundamentals.
“Whatever breeds disrespect for
the law of the land, in any particu
lar department of our community
relations, is a force tending to the
general- breakdown of the social or
ganization. If people who are
known as leaders, as directing in
fluences, as thoroughly respected
and respectable members of society,
shall in their respective communities
become known for their defiance of
some part of the code of law, then
they need not be astonished if pres
ently they find that. their example
is followed by others, with the re
sult that presently the law in gen
eral comes to be looked upon as a
set of irksome and- unreasonable re
straints upon the liberty of the in
dividual. * * * Our only safety will
be in inculcating an attitude of res
pect for the law, as on the whole
the best expression that has been
given to the social aspiration and
moral purpose of the community.
“Unless we can accomplish this,
in the domain of citizenship, and
thereby sustain enforcement, we may
well feel that the outlook is not en
couraging for the achievement of
those loftier spiritual purposes to
which the church is devoted. * * *
“The failures of the past invari
ably have been preceded by con
tempt for the law, by spiritual par
| alysis and moral looseness, all of
which had their earlier reflex in the
i weakened influence of the church.
! We know the helpful, exalting in
I fluence of our religious institutions.
1 We shall be made stronger as they
become stronger, and we shall ever
find greater pride and greater se
curity in the nation which righteous
ness exalteth."
PILES
cm to nUtNd with one twHwtto
** SALE'S SALVE
It la aoothlne and haallnj and wfll
sasriishsf.'ss!? HKt
ROWLAND DRUG CO.
' * f
I "Black-Draught is. in toI
> my opinion, the t>est liver fpCL
medicine on the market,”
! states Mrs. R. H. White- mm
! side.of Keota.Okla. She »»
( continues: “I had a pain
[ in my chest after eating— )£ls9
* tight, uncomfortable feel- Sggjd
i ing—and this was very wSga
[ disagreeable and brought ICTji
| on headache. 1 was con- 2ZL
I stipated and knew it was na]
[ indigestion and inactive wm
? liver. 1 began the use of s&s
I Black-Draught, night and Cjj
I morning, and it sure is fpJiSP
! splendid and certainly
| gives relief.” rawl
Thedford’s
BLACK
DRAUGHT
*
- •• t ■
Mrs. L. writes:
\ u 1 am convinced there is a difference in
baking powder. I have been using ally
1 old powder for ten years but my cakes
are 100 per cent better since 1 bought a
| can of Royal Baking Powder. I recom
mend it to any housewife who thinks she
knows all about cake making with any
kind of powder.**
ROYAL
BAKING POWDER
Absolutely Pure
Contains No Alum Leaves No Bitter Taste |
Send for New Royal Cook Book—It's FREE
Royal Baking Powder Co., 130 William SL, New York
Oxford Single Comb
White Leghorns
OWNED BY D. B. RAY,
OXFORD, MISSISSIPPI. ■'
,
Pen No. 1—Headed1 by a $25.00 Ferris Cock, KING SNOW, and
mated to 10 A. & M. College hens, costing $5.00 each. Each
one trap-nested and every egg pedigreed.
This pen contains some of our best laying hens, laying
22 eggs each during month of February and cannot be ex
celled in the South for beauty and egg laying qualities.
Eggs from this pen .$3.00 per 15
Pen No. 2—Headed by a $20.00 Cockerel, MIKADO, and 10 pullets
from Cremer Farms, New Orleans, La. This farm woti
' 1
sweepstakes at Tri-State Fair 1921.
This pen has all the show type together with the high
egg producing qualities not found in most flocks of eithei
type. ;;
Every pullet trap-nested and each egg pedigreed.
! Eggs from this pen .*. $3.00 per 15
;; Pen No. 3—Headed by a $25.00 Ferris Cockerel, PRINCE PEARL,
and mated to hens of my utility stock that we are trying
to build up by this excellent male and we have great hopes
of producing some high egg producers from this flock.
Hens in this pen equally as good layers as pen 1 and 2, but
do not quite come up to other good points in show quality.
| For foundation stock and a good start in leghorns you will
make no mistake by getting some of these eggs.
$1.50 per 15.
COME AND SEE OUR LEGHORNS; ALL STOCK AND
EGGS FULLY GUARANTEED TO GIVE SATISFAC
TION.
—PHONE $87—
:: . \ _1
TULA.
Our school closed last Monday.
We miss the boys and girls so much
The school was taught by Prof. E.
T. Leavell and a corps of assistants
that can not be excelled in the state,
and we had four school wagons from
the east, one south and one west,
The consolidation of the school has
not been as satisfactory as we hoped
on account of the roads. If the sup
ervsiors do not have the roads work
ed according to contract consolida
tion of schools will not be a success
in this part of the county.
Nine weeks ago the material used
in building the school house were
standing trees in the forest. We
have the house framed, weather
boarded and covered and the first
floors down and the flooring for the
second floor in the house, but will not
complete the house before summer.
' Now we want to say to the good
people of Oxford and elsewhere who
have so kindly and materially come
to our help that in behalf of Tula
we earnestly thank each and every
one that has subscribed to or helped,
and to the Editor of the Eagle for
heading the list with a liberal dona
tion. We would not fail to thank
Mr. G. R. Bowles, for the interest
he has taken in helping us and
again thanking every one who gave
aid in helping us to rebuild.
. NON-RESIDENT NOTICE.
No. 5335.
State of Mississippi.
To Leonidas Wilson:
You are commanded to appear be
fore the Chancery Court of the
County of Lafayette, in said State
on the 4th Monday of May, A. D.
1922, to defend the suit in said Courl
of Margaret Wilson, wherein you
are a defendant.
This 3rd day of April. 1922.
W. M. WOODWARD, Cleric.
Dr. T. H. Somerville, Sol. for Comp’t
(E. Apr. 6-13-20.) _
-NON-RESIDENT NOTICE.
No. 5330.
E. E. TEMPLE,
Vs.
E. L. PETTY and MRS. MINNIE
pn/tvj<y
SISSIPPI,, BILL TO CANCEL
CONVEYANCE OF LAND.
To E. L. Petty and wife, Mrs.
Minnie Petty, residents of Glass
County, State of Tennessee, and
whose post office address is Pros
pect, R. F. D. No. 2 in said State,
you and each of you are hereby com
manded to be and personally appear
before .the Honorable Chancery
Court of Lafayette County, State of
Mississippi, to be held at the Court
House in the city of Oxford on the
4th Monday of May, 1922, the same
being the 22nd day of said month,
then and there to plead, answer or
demur to the bill of complaint filed
by E. E. Temple in said Court seek
ing to set aside the conveyance made
by E. L. Petty to his wife, Mrs.
Minnie Petty of lands in Lafayette
County, Mississippi.
Witness the signature of the
Chancery Clerk of said County, this
the 5th day of April, 1922.
W. M. WOODWARD, Clerk.
Jas. Stone & Son,
Sol. for Comp’t.
(E. April 6-13-20.)
NON-RESIDENT NOTICE.
No. 5336.
G. E. Bratton,
vs.
Mrs. Dollie Jane Bratton, et al.
IN THE CHANCERY COURT OF
LAFAYETTE COUNTY. MISSIS
SIPPI, MAY TERM, 1922.
To Mrs. Dollie Jane Bratton, Oral
Eddie Bratton, Theodore Debro Brat
ton, Georgia Lynn Bratton, the last
three of whom are minors without
guardians, and citizens of the State
of Texas and whose post office ad
dress is Josephine in said State, Mrs.
Annie Graham, who is a citizen of
the State of North Carolina and
whose post office address is Hasty
in said State, and Mrs. Emily Gra
ham, who is a citizen of the State of
North Carolina and whose post office
address is Maxton in said State, and
other unknown heirs at law of H. H.
Graham, deceased, whose names and
1 post office addresses are unknown,
; you and each of you are hereby com
manded to be and appear before the
Honorable Chancery Court _ of la
fayette County, State of Mississippi,
at the Court House thereof, in city
of Oxford to be held on the fourth
Monday in May, '1922, the same being
the 22nd day of said month, then
and there to plead, answer or demur
to the bill of G. E. Bratton filed
against you and each of you and
others for the purpose of construing
! the Will of H. H. Graham, deceased,
in which said suit you are made par
1 ties defendant
• Witness the signature and seal ol
office of W. M. Woodward, Chancery
Clerk, this the 4th day of April,
1922
W. M. WOODWARD,
Chancery Clerk.
Jas. Stone & Son, Sol. for Petitioner.
(April 6-13-20.)_____
NON-RESIDENT NOTICE!
No. 5332.
State of Mississippi
To Roberta Brinkley Ragland, whose
post office address is St. Louis,
Mo.:
You*are commanded to appear be
fore the Chancery Court of the
County of Lafayette, in said State,
on the fourth Monday of May, A. D.,
1922, to defend the suit in said court
of Epsiey Raglan 1 wherein you are
a defendant. This the 30th day of
March, 1922.
R. X. Williams, Sol. for Comp’t.
(E. April 6-13-20.)
THE CHARTER OF INCORPORA
TION OF
City of Oxford Building & Loan As
sociation.
1. The corporate title of said
company is City of Oxford Building
& Loan Association.
2. The names of the incorporators
are:
J. J. Vance, Postoffice, Oxford, J
Mississippi. f
J. E. Hargis, Postoffice, Oxford, '
Mississippi.
L. C. Andrews, Postoffice, Oxford,
Mississippi.
E. D. Beanland, Postoffice, Ox
ford. Mississippi.
G. M. Knight, Postoffice, Oxford,
J. A. Parks, Postoffice, Oxford,
Mississippi.
H. Friedman, Postoffice, Oxford,
Mississippi.
3. The domicile is at Oxford,
Lafayette county, Mississippi.
4. Amount of capital stock $100,
000.00.
5- The par value of shares is
One Hundred dollars each.
6. The period of existence (not
to exceed fifty years' is (50) years.
7. The purpose for which it is
created: The accumulation of a
fund which may be loaned on good
real estate security, to the members
thereof, or borrowers who are not
members, to acquire real estate up
on which to build homes, make im
provements thereon, remove en
cumbrances therefrom. purchase
homes or build homes.
1 ne curpurauun may ui^aiu^r ana
begin business when 100 shares of
the capital stock are subscribed.
On each share of stock there shall
be paid a monthly installment of
One dollar, in advance, thereby ac
cumulating the fund above named
to be used and advanced for the
purposes aforesaid, to the end that
the profits arising from the business
thus transacted shall, with the
monthly payments, largely reduce
the number of months required to
make each share worth its par value
of $100.00.
8. The right and powers that may
be exercised by this corporation
are those conferred by the provisions
of Chapter 24, Mississippi Code,
1906, and of Chapter 167 of the laws
of 1912.
J. A. PARKS.
J. J. VANCE,
J. E. HARGIS,
H. FRIEDMAN,
L. C. ANDREWS.
E. D. BEANLAND,
G. M. KNIGHT,
Incorporators.
ACKNOWLEDGEMENT.
STATE OE MISSISSIPPI,
County of Lafayette.
This day personally appeared be
fore me, the undersigned authority
J. J. Vance, J'. E. Hargis, L. C. An
drews, E. D. Beanland, G. M. Knight,
J. A. Parks, and H. Friedman, incor
porators of the corporation known
as the City of Oxford Building &
Loan Association who acknowledged
that they signed and executed the
above and foregoing articles of in
corporoation as their act and deed
on this the 27th day of March, 1922.
F. M. HEARD, Notary Public.
My commission expires Jan. 27,
1924.
(E. Mar. 30- April 6-13-20.)
NON-RESIDENT NOTICE.
No. 5329.
State of Mississippi.
To William Reese, Defendant, whose
Post Office Address, when last
heard from was Memphis,
Tennessee:
You are commanded to appear be
fore the Chancery Court of the coun
ty of Lafayette, in said State, on the
4th Monday of May, A. D. 1922, to
defend the suit in said court of Ilea
Reese, wherein you are Defendant.
This 28th day of March* A. D.,
1922
“ W. M. WOODWARD, Clerk.
March 30-April 6-13-20.__
-NON-RESIDENT notice.
No. 5331.
E. E. TEMPLE,
Vs.
W. J. PAISLEY and MRS. IRENE
paisley
IN THE CHANCERY COURT OF
LAFAYETTE COUNTY, MIS
SISSIPPI, BILL TO CANCEL
CONVEYANCE OF LAND.
To W. J. Paisley and wife Mrs.
Irene Paisley*, residents of Giles
County, State of Tennessee, and
whose post office address is Pros
pect, R. F. D. No. 2 in said State,
you and each bf you are hereby com
manded to be and personally appear
before the Honorable Chancery
Court of Lafayette County, State of
Mississippi to be held at the Court
House in the city of Oxford on the
4th Monday of May, 1922, the same
being the 22nd day of said month,
then and there to plead, answer or
demur to the bill of complaint filed
by E. E. Temple in said Court seek
ing to 3et aside the conveyance made
by W. J. Paisley to his wife ,Mrs.
Irene Paisley of lands in Lafayette
County, Mississippi.
Witness the signature of the
Chancery Clerk of said County, thi3
the 5th day of April, 1922.
* W. M. WOODWARD, Clerk.
Jas. Stone A Son,
Sol. for Comp’t
(April 6-13-20.)

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