OCR Interpretation


The Neshoba Democrat. (Philadelphia, Miss.) 1881-current, January 21, 1909, Image 2

Image and text provided by Mississippi Department of Archives and History

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87065535/1909-01-21/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

The Neshoba Democrat
PUBLISHED WEEKLY.
PHILADELPHIA. : MISSISSIPPI
THE NEWS
IN BRIEF
A GENERAL SUMMARY OF IMPOR
TANT NEWS OF THE WEEK
GATHERED FROM ALL OVER.
As the result of an explosion at
liiek Branch mine, at Switchback.
W. Va.. between 50 and 100 miners
were killed.
With twenty state senators voting
for it, the Holladay state-wide pro
hibition bill has been passed in the
upper branch of the general as
sembly of Tennessee.
The administration, it is learned,
is preparing a bill for the exclusion
of Asiatic laborers, intended to
make the exclusion laws more eco
nomical and effective.
Analysis of the returns of the
recent prosidcntal election discloses
that one county of the United States,
Zapata County, Texas, cast its vote
unanimously for the Rcpuhlisaii elec
tors.
Joseph Massing, aged 43 years,
while hunting near Madison, Jnd.,
leaned on his rifle, and his dog in
pawing at him pulled the trigger
and the bullet entered Massing’s
side.
It will require $234,000,000 to
run the jjostal service during the
liscal year 1!)10, according to the
decision reached by the House Com
mittee on Post Offices and Post
Roads.
The Ways and Means Comfittee
reported favorably to the House the
bill introduced by Cl airman Payne
providing a duty of sl.lO a gallon
on bay rum imported from Porto
Rico.
In commemoration of the 100th
anniversary of the birth of Abraham
Lincoln, the House authorized the
postmaster general, to issue Lincoln
postage stamps of the denomination
of 2 cents.
The Illinois branch of the Red
Cross Society has forwarded more
than $76,000 to Washington to be
transmitted to the Italian Rod
Cross to be used for the relief of
earthquake sufferers.
President Roosevelt rode ninety
miles on horseback as an experiment,
and when he dismounted at the
White House door, after seventeen
hours in the saddle, ho did not show
any marked signs of weariness.
Mrs. Elizabeth Anderson, a col
ored woman, aged 107, and a former
slave, said to he the oldest person
m Indiana, is dead at Indianapolis.
She always said she remembered
Jamse Madison and Thomas Jeffer
son well.
Much interest was manifested by
the senators in the procedure that
will be adopted to dispose of the
charges by the President against
Senator Tillman in relation to the
attempted purchase of timber lauds
in Oregon.
After a long period of hard,
patient work, Secretary of State
Root and Ambassador Bryce of
Treat Britiau Tuesday night signed
& treaty for the settlement of inter
national differences between the
national differences between the
United States and Canada.
Alf H. Cardin of New Albany,
Ind., until recently a resident of
Crittenden county, Kentucky, filed
suit in the United States court here
•gainst William Neal and about one
hundred others alleged night riders
of Marshall, Crittenden. Caldwell,
Trigg and Lyon counties, for $16,-
*OO damages, claiming they burned
his tobacco warehouse at View, Ky.,
on the night of Feb. 8, 1908, and
compelled him to leave the state.
That Geo. von Lengerkc Meyers,
the present postmoster-general has
been selected as secretary of the navy
in the Taft cabinet and has accepted
the appointment is reported from
trustworthy sources.
"The time is coming in this coun
try when trees will be scarce as
diamonds, unless immediate steps
are taken to preserve our forests.”
Says Secretary of Argriculture Wil
ton in an address recently.
Directors of the National Bill
Posters’ Association, in session at
Oklahoma City, issued an order for
bidding members of the association
to post nude pictures, such as are
used to advertise union suits and
corsets.
Judge Thomas G. Jones of the
Tinted Slates Court for the Middle
District of Tennessee, in a elaborate
opinion Wednesday afternoon held
the Carmiehael prohibition act. un
dor which this state is operating,
constitutional.
While both were riding on the
same mule William Nix. who sat
in front, was cut to death by his
brother-in-law, Bright Gilstrap, two
miles south of Cleveland, Ga. Gil
strap, according to report, stabbed
Nix seventeen times.
Herbert S. Hadley, former attor
ney general for Missouri, was sworn
in as governor Tuesday at noon by
Justice Lamm of the supreme court.
A blizzard raged outside the capitol,
but the inaugural ceremonies were
attended by immense throngs.
One by one, as Ids four children
descended the stairs from their bed
rooms Wednesday, James York, a
quarry worker, at Bradley's Cross
ing. Minn., slaughtered them all
with a knife. Then lie went into
a woodshed and hanged himself.
Thos. J. Akins of St. Louis was
before the House Committee on
Claims for more than an hour Wed
nesday, submitting to a lengthy ex
amination by members of that com
mittee regarding the $1(i,500 short
age discovered in the St. Louis sub
treasury more than two years ago.
For several days stories have been
going the rounds that the relations
between the President and Judge
Taft wore strained. Dissatisfaction
at the White House because of the
prominence given to “reactionaries”
in the prospective Taft Cabinet was
given as the basis for the alleged
estrangement.
The first infliction of capital
punishment in France for a number
of years past were witnessed in this
town this weak, when four murder
ers were decapitated by the guillo
tine. The executions wore public
and took place in the presence, of
a large crowd.
Speedy action to prevent lobby
ing in the Kansas Legislature, was
outlined in Hie House, when it pass
ed a reolution authorizing the
speaker to appoint a committee to
act jointly with a similar commit
tee from the Senate to frame an
antilobbying bill to bo rushed
through to passage.
Through the sympathy of Charles
W. Morse, the Wall-street linancicr
who was sentenced to 15 years’ im
prisonment for breaking the Federal
banking laws, a young Texan named
James B. Wilson will return to his
home in San Antonio and take a
fresh start in life.
Plans for what it is stated will
be the most extensive publicity
campaign ever conducted in the in
terest of great national problems as
they confront the church have been
announced in New York by the
Home Missions Council of the Evan
gelical denominations throughout
tlie United States.
As the resit of keeping a New
Year’s resolution, in which ho gave
up the use of cigarettes, Edward
Lane, 20 years old, died at Hazle
ton, Ind. He was addited to ex
cessive smoking and was urged to
stop them with the new year. So
accustomed had the young man be
come to the use that the denial
affected his nervous system seriously.
Following the receipt of special
cable dispatches from San Francisco
Tokio, Japan, relating to matters
now r pending before the California
Legislature Japanese newspapers
here elaborate upon the strained re
lations that may arise through the
passage 6f bills and the enactment
of laws forbidding the ownership
of land and the, 'attendance of pub
lic schools by Japanese residents of
the state.
The second day of the Kansas
Legislature opened with some excite
ment, when Nick Childs, editor of
a negro paper, was thrown out of
the speaker’s office by the speaker,
J. N. Policy. Childs went into the
speaker's office shortly before the ses
sion began and demanded that more
negroes he placed on the pay roll,
Then Dolley calmly took Childs by
the shoulders and threw him out of
the door.
Miss Hufe, a school nurse of
Cambridge, Mass., says that cig
arette smoking is that city- is very
common and that hundreds of little
girls are among the smokers. About
two-thirds of the girls smoke from
five to fifteen cigarettes a day.
Xose affections and heart trouble
result.
The State Corporation Commis
sion of Oklahoma began the hearing
of -a docket of sixty-two eases this
week, including ten, eases of con
tempt, four each against the Santa
Fc and Rock Island railroads and
two against the Frisco, for violations
of the mill and transit order and
other rules of the commission.
Estimates place the damage re
sulting from the blizzard which
swept Texas from the Pan-Handle
to the gulf coast at more than one
million and a half dollars. .In the
western section it is known that at
least 10,000 head of cattle succumb
ed, while more suffered from the
wave.
It was learned from an authori
tative source here that the United
Sates Government has forced the
Honduran (lovernment to apologize
for an insult offiered to an American
consular officer by a Honduran offi
cial. The offending Honduran offi
cial was dismissed from office and
officially degraded on the emphatic
demand of the United States.
Gov. Denccn and the other state
officers-dect will be inaugurated
next Monday. The legislative dead
lock over the canvass of the vote
has been broken. The vote was can
vassed and the result officially de
clared. Arrangements were then
made for the inaugural ceremonies
on dan nary IS —just one week after
the date iixed by the constitution.
A resolution declaring the water
wagon in Oklahoma to be a common
carrier was introduced in the Okla
homa house by Representative “Bill”
Durant of Durant, passed with a
whoop, and sent to the senate for
concurrence. The resolution de
daies that the welfare of the peo
ple demands that the state-wide pro
hibition law have the moral support
of the state’s entire citizenship.
‘‘Many people are sending me
material in regard to Roosevelts
dark and crooked ways and 1 am
preparing a speech in which 1 will
try to redeem my promise made,”
said Senator Tillman. He said he
did not know how soon ho would
bo able to deliver his speech, hut
ho would make it before the presi
dent retired from office.
Thornton Jenkins Hains listened
to the last of the testimony that
can possibly he given against him
when iie hoard the rebuttal witness
called by Prosecutor Darrin. Judge
Crane promised Attorney Mclntyre
that he could have all day in which
to deliver his summing up address
to the jury. Mr. Mclntyre said
that he could use every minute of
the court day and that he might
need to ask Judge Crane to extend
the legal day.
The National • Government has
come to a realization that the Pana
ma Canal will cost in the neighbor
hood of .$300,000,000. It proposes
to issue bonds early in the spring
which will go a long ways toward
reimbursing the treasury for the ex
penditures which have already been
made. 'The 1 ime is considered op
portune because of the general re
vival of commercial and trade condi
tions coincident with the incoming
administration.
It was learned Friday on reliable
authority that the Department of
Justice had turned over to the
United States district attorney,
Stimson, of the Southern district
of New York, all the papers con
nected with the Panama canal pur
chase, which has been the target
for criticism, for the last few months.
It is believed this transfer is made
with a view of bringing criminal
action in New York against publish
ers of newspapers who have been
held responsible for the reflections
on the transaction.
All the attorneys of the Watere-
Pieree Oil Company, as well ns H.
Clay Pierce, chairman of the Board
of Directors of the eoniany, refused
to discuss in any way what action
would he taken by the company to
meet the demand of the Missouri
Supreme Court that the company
sever all connection with the Stand
ard Oil Comany by the end of th
week or sacrifice its charter.
Mississippi g||
IJtfU'S *
i aHwaust
A rather novel proceeding by way ol
a writ of injunction was filed anc
granted at Collins by Judge Bullard,
in the case of Robert Gains vs. tht
Sheriff and Treasurer of Jasper county
The lull seeks to restrain the defend
ants as officers from using money and
collecting taxes for the support of the
agricultural schools, as provided by the
last legislature. The legislature pro
vided that counties could establish these
schools for the education of the white
youths of the counties, and the com
plainant in this case is a negro, and
seeks to restrain the carrying out ol
the act, because it violates the Four
teenth Amendment.
Dr. 8. If. McLean, secretary of the
State board of health and state health
officer, announces that Dr. Fred Mayci
had a successful week in his lecture
course ou practical household hygiene in
Southern Mississippi, his lectures hav
ing been generally well attended, and
interest in the important matters dis
cussed by the doctor remains unabated.
The program for this week will cover
the Mobile and Ohio railroad below
Meridian. This round will finish up the
section of the State south of the Ala
bama and 'Vicksburg railroad, and the
next week Dr. Mayer will carry his hy
gienic crusade into the upper part of
the State, the itinerary for which has
not yet been fully made up.
J. C. Carraway of Biloxi, one of the
foremost business men of that little
•ity, states that while matters are un
usually quiet, and the effect of the
State-wide prohibition law is felt, not
withstanding they were prepared by
anticipation, so far as his information
extends there have been no cases of or
attempts at violation or evasion of the
law, and no arrests. They are disposed
to accept the law and to see that it is
obeyed, and he believes that this will
!>e done.
Tom Morrissey and his barkeepers, W.
J. Fitzgerald and Ralph Romono, were
"ach fined SSO for the unlawful retail
ing of liquor on the island opposite
Vicksburg. Justice March held that the
middle of the old bed of the Mississippi
river was the boundary line between
Louisiana and Mississippi, and there
fore the place where Morrissey opened
his saloon and sold liquor was clearly
in the State of Mississippi.
At a meeting of the stockholders of
the First National Bank of Shaw, a divi
dend of It per cent was declared. The
stockholders of the Bolivar Cotton Cos.
declared ,911 per cent net earnings, pass
ing IS per cent to surplus and paying
15 per cent in cash. A dividend of ;.’0
per cent was also declared by the Shaw
Hardware and Lumber Cos. and paid ia
sash.
Representative McLain of Mississippi,
.■“ailed upon the secretary of the navy
and presented a petition from the citi
zens of Natchez requesting that a war
vessel be sent to that port during the
Mardi Gras festivities. Secretary New
berry assured Mr. McLain that if it is
possible he will do so, and that within
the next two weeks he may decide,
Mardi festivities are there in F’ebruary.
While the students were at dinner
(ire broke out in the hoys’ dormitory of
Clarke College, at Newton, and had
gained such headway before it was dis
covered that it was impossible to save
it. It was entirely covered by insur
ance. Arrangements were made to take
care of all the students and there will
be no interruption of the school.
The preliminary trial of Dyke and A1
Edwards for killing Dr. A. F. Richard
son in Sturgis on the night of Dec. 24,
1908, resulted in bail being allowed the
accused in the sum of $5,000 each. This
trial, on account of the prominence of
Dr. Richardson, who was a member of
the State board of health and one of the
leading physicians of Oktibbeha county,
attracted a great deal of interest.
The civic league wave has struck Co
lumbus and the ladies are determined to
add that, city to the list of “cities beau
tiful.” A local league will be organized
along lines similar to those pursued in
other cities.
The net earnings of the Sunflower
Bunk at Indianola were 18 per cent, and
a dividend of 12 per cent to the stock
holders was declared and the balance
passed to the surplus.
The Daughters of the Confederacy
have undertaken to raise a fund to erect
a monument to the Confederate dead of
Copiah county. The board of supervisors
of Copiah county will be asked to give a
liberal appropriation.
Grand Master E. J. Martin of the Mis
sissippi grand lodge of the Masonic fra
ternity, announces that the Masonic
grand bodies will hold their annual ses
sions this year in Meridian, commencin';
cn Feb. 8. A local committee on ar
rangements is now busily engaged with
preparations for the event. It is expect
ud that there will be several hundrer
delegates in attendance, ami several pub
lie entertainments will be given in theii
honor during the stay in the Queen City,
which has long been regarded as Mas-mii
headquarters in this State.
TAFT HONORED BY GEORGIANS
Makes Speech in Which He Say*
South Has Captured Him.
Atlanta, Ga.—President-elect Win. II
Taft was in the cordial and hospitable
embrace of Georgia all day Friday.
Recognizing the climax of the varied
and continuous demonstrations in the
brilliant and imposing scene presented
at the banquet in the evening, he ex
claimed, with evidences of great feeling:
“I had hoped to win the South, but the
South has won me.”
The banquet was the most ambitious
event of its kind the city has ever un
dertaken. Though participated in by
more than 500 of the city’s representa
tive men, it was gloried in by the en
tire population, it and the preceding
eloquence of welcome extended to Mr.
Taft in his reception at the capital and
at the Piedmont Hotel, where he was
sought by thousands, constitute a bril
liant chapter in his record of achieve
meats south of Mason and Dixon's line.
A little bunch of violets, plucked from
the grave of Alexander Stephens and
presented by a grandniece of the dis
tinguished Georgian, touched a tender
cord and brought forth a warm tribute
to the memory of Stephens.
RECORD FOR LITIGATION.
Standard Suit in New York Has
Cost Trust $4,000,000.
New York.—An unprecedented record
of cost in a single suit and a record of
words of testimony never before a]>-
proaehed in a case prosecuted by the
federal government were revealed Fri
day when the ease, the object of which
is to dissolve the Standard Oil Com
pany of New Jersey, ended.
The testimony taken tilled twenty
two printed books. The Standard Oil
Company spent more than $4,000,000
to defend itself, and the federal govern
ment spent about the same amount in
prosecuting. Sixty-nine companies de
clared to be subsidiary to the Standard
Oil were involved in the suit.
Exactly 102 witnesses were called by
Hie government, and 140 by the defend
ant. The testimony consists of 4,500,-
000 words, a greater number, perhaps,
than any ever taken in a trial by the
United States government of an indi
vidual or corporation. If all the testi
mony were printed and hound the vol
umes would be more than seven feet
high.
DE SAGAN RIVALS BONI.
Making Effort to Best Count in
Matters of Fashion.
Paris. —Ilelie do Sagan, in order to
how that lie is quite as worthy to bo
the husband of Anna Gould as Boni do
Castellano, has created two sensations
this week. One was having judgment
pronounced against him for 650,000
fracs due a money lender on a note
signed on November 29, 1907. So far
as the agents of the money lender know,
the only property of De Sagan consists
of 100 new waistcoats. Tuesday he
visited a fashionable tailor’s establish
ment in Hie Avenue Champs Elysecs,
and, taking up a book of samples, said:
“Make me one of each.”
There were exactly a hundred, of all
different designs.
Prince Helie lias not yet equaled his
predecessor, Count Boni, who one day
ordered 200 pairs of trousers.
FIGHT ON SALARY INCREASES
House May Show Opposition to In
crease in President’s Pay.
Washington.—Tlmt the senate amend
ments to the legislative, executive and
judicial appropriation hill, increasing the
salary of the president to SIOO,OOO, of
the vice-president and speaker of the
house of representatives to $20,000 each,
with an allowance for a carriage of
$5,000 each for the vice-president and
speaker, arc not to be approved without
some opposition, was shown in the sen
ate when Senator Borah of Idaho, first
made a point of order against them ns
new legislation. Mr. Clay of Georgia,
also asked that all proposed increases
of salaries of judges, aggregating $928,-
500, be dealt with in the same manner,
and they will be discussed after the
other portions of the bill have been dis
posed of. t
REACTION AGAINST REFORM.
Texas Farmers Will Ask Reopening of
Cotton Exchanges.
Austin, Tex. —It is learned today that
the farmers of Texas have secured their
fill of the law that banished cotton ex
changes from the State, and they are
going to come before the present legis
lature with a petition asking that the
law he repealed so that the cotton ex
changes can open again. It is claimed
that the farmers have lost $.9,000,000 in
two years since the law went into ef
fect.
Statehood Bill Expected.
Washington.—Arizona and Now Mex
ico are in a fair way to become full
fledged States during the present ses
sion of congress. The House Commit
tee on territories is to take up the
Statehood measures in the immediate
future with the object of reporting
them to the house as early as possible.
Conferences between members of the
Territories Committee and lenders of the
house have been held frequently within
the past two weeks and the advocates
of Statehood from both territories have
been active in a quiet way. .
CATARRH IN HEAD.
Pe-ru-na Pe-ru-na.
MR. WM. A. PRESSER.
MR. WILLIAM A. PRESSER, 1722
Third Ave., Moline, 111., writes;
“1 have been suffering' from ca tarrh.
in the head for the past two month
and tried innumerable so-called reme
dies without avail. No one knows how
1 have suffered not only from the dis
ease itself, but from mortifieation when:
in company of friends or strangers.
“i have used two bottles of your med
icine for a short time only, and it
effected a complete medical cure, and
what is better yet, the disease has not
returned.
“1 can most emphatically recommend
Peruna to all sufferers from this dis
ease.”
Read This Experience
Mr. A. Thompson, Box 65, R. R. 1„
Martel, Ohio, writes: ‘‘When 1 began
your treatment my eyes were inflamed..
nose was stopped up half of the time
and was sore and scabby. I could not
rest at night on account of continual
hawking and spitting.
“I had tried several remedies and was
about to give up, but thought 1 would
try Peruna.
“After I had taken about one-third oi
a bottle I noticed a difference. I am
now completely cured, after suffering
with catarrh for eighteen years.
“I think if those who are afflicted
with catarrh would try Pci ana they
would never regret it.”
Peruna is manufactured by the
Peruna Drug Mfg. Cos., Columbus, Ohio
Ask your Druggist for a Free Peruna
Almanac for 1909.
NO TEMPTATION.
iPßiif
Wag (referring to Miss Oldbird) —
Urn, I should think it would be more
suitable if she were standing under
“elderberries”- instead of mistletoe
berries.
t . He Wouldn’t Sell.
The owner of a small country es
tate decided to sell his property, and
consulted an estate agent in the near
est town about the matter. After visit
ing the place the agent wrote a de
scription of it, and submitted it to his
client for approval.
“Road that again,” said the owner,
closing his eyes and leaning back in
his chair contentedly.
After the second reading he was
silent a few moments, and then said,
thoughtfully: “I don't think I’ll sell.
I've been looking for that kind of a
place all my life, but until you read
that description 1 didn't know I had
it! No, 1 won't sell now.” —Exchange.
His Vocabulary.
He was an only child. They were
very particular about his manner of
speech, constantly correcting him so
that he would use beautiful English.
He, however, was allowed now and
then to associate with other children.
He played with a neighbor boy a long
while one day and when he came
home there was an ecstatic smile on
his face.
“I like (hat boy, mother,” he said
“T like him very ranch. He swears
beautifully. He knows every word.”'
HER MOTHER-IN-LAW
Proved a Wise, Good Friend.
A young woman out in la, found a.
wise, good friend in her mother-in-law,,
jokes notwithstanding. She writes:
“It is two years since wo began us
ing Postum in our house. I was great
ly troubled with my stomach, complex
ion was blotchy and yellow. After
meals I often suffered sharp pains and
would have to lie down. My mother
often told me it was the coffee I drank
at meals. But when I’d quit coffee I’d
have a severe headache.
“While visiting my mother-in-law 1
remarked that she always made such
good coffee, and asked her to tell me
how. She laughed and told me it was
easy to make good ‘coffee’ when you
use Postum.
"I began to use as soon as I
got home, and now we have the same
good ‘coffee’ (Postum) every day, and
I have no more trouble. Indigestion is
a thing of the past, and my complex
ion has cleared up beautifully.
“My grandmother suffered a great
deal with her stomach. Her doctor
told her to leave off coffee. She then
took tea but that was just as bad.
"She finally was induced to try
Postum which she has used for over a
year. She traveled during the winter
over the greater part of lowa, visiting,
something she had not been able to do
’for years. She says she owes her
present good health to Postum.”
Name given by Postum Cos., Baft o
Creek, Mich? Read, “The Road to Well
ville,” in pkgfc. “There’s a Reason.”
Ever rend the above letter? A nevt
one ii|i|ienrN from- time to lime. Thra
are genuine, true, and full of liumM
Interest.

xml | txt