OCR Interpretation


East Mississippi times. (Starkville, Miss.) 19??-1926, April 29, 1910, Image 4

Image and text provided by Mississippi Department of Archives and History

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87065609/1910-04-29/ed-1/seq-4/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

EAST MISSISSIPPI TIMES
BTAKKVILLK, MISS.
WM.'wAKP, W>lTeii? AI PUBLISHER.
Death of Mr. W. H. McCann
Mr. W. If, MoCatin, one of Ok
tibbeha county’s oldest and most
honored citizens died at his home
in Longview,on Saturday morning
April 2frd,
Mr. McCann reached an advanc
ed age and for the pest five years
hud been in feeble health. He
was a native of North Carolina,
hut had been a resident of this
County for over a half a century.
The funeral services were held
in this city at the residence of Mr.
J. J. Henry. The services were
conducted by Rev. W. E. M. Bro
gan, pastor of the Htarkville Meth
odist church and Hcv. W. A. Jor
dan of the Baptist Church. At
the Conclusion the body was car
ried to Fellowship Cemetery and
laid to rest by the Odd Fellows, of
which Order he was a devoted mem
ber.
The deceased leaves a widow
and a number of children and
grandchildren.
A useful citizen, a kind husband
and father—a man whom every
one loved and respected has gone
to his reward.
Dr. B. M. Walker did not deliv
er his fourth lecture at the Baptist
church last Sunday afternoon on
the‘‘World’s (ircat Battles,” on
on account of the inconvenience
caused him by the loss of his home
by lire on tlial| day. This lecture
however, will be delivered Sunday
afternoon and everybody is cordial
ly invited to attend.
Mr. (.has. E. (Jay. assistant
cashier of the People's Saving
Bunk, is at his post of duty again
otter being confined to his lied for
(A week or more.
I&tarkuillp iUrtljnMßt lEjjtfirapal (ftljurrlj, &flutly
TREASURERS STATEMENT,
• From January 19tK. 1910 to April 29tK, I^lo.
RECEIPTS
lotul Amount received on assessments $ 750 07
Incidental fund turned over by former Treasurer 50 00 I
Incidental collections, .fannafry 10 to April 29, 1910 09 C 9 j
Received for the Harbin meeting by contributions and basket of
ferings during the’meeting ‘>lo ;io 1
lotal money received from all sources $ ioso 00 ||
DISBURSEMENTS I
Remitted on Conference collections (Domestic Missions) $ 02 00
Paid pastor's Dec., Jan., Feb. and March salary 474 55 I
Paid Presiding Elder’s salary, first two quarters 108 ■*,, I
laid VV. (>. Harbin for holding meeting $ 200 00 1
Paid Harbin and Carpenter’s board 50 |j
I aid janitor for services during meeting 10 00 ||lj
Paid for lights during meeting 10 I
Total expense of Harbin meeting M;f) (W
Paid Joe Rontten for choir services, li months
Paid for clerical assistance to secretary
Paid for stationery, printing, postage, janitor and incidentals % £
Paid L. H. Camp Expenses to Jackson (Delegate to Conv’n). ‘ B *j”, \ ’
Paid on local charity
„ .. ‘ 14 55
1 aid insurance on parsonage . j ,
I I t , * * ** * • 20 00
iijl Paid Turner & Pierce acd’t for parsonage ■■ •
ij I Money in bank J 9 \>s
I . . , 34 00*
Hi! C ÜBll 011 hand
I V j
I Total ■ > I*.! 1
I t , , # 1689 0C . 7;!
| Respectfully submitted, 1 ‘
jl L- B. CAMP. Soct yajid Trea*.
I••
III! . 1 . •
IB '
I 1 ■' r
J . . ' ’ ' '-.IV
Mr. Herman Kleban, who is now
in business in New York City, is
spending (Jeveral days Ijere tl is
week, and it is needless to say I is
many frirnds are glad to see him.
The many friends and admirers
hereof Mrs. Kleban will he glad to
learn that she is enjoying the best
of health, and the little one who
came to bless the Kleban home
since they left Starkville is a thriv
ing and beautiful girl baby.
A meeting was held at the Col
lege this week, regarding the
building of the model road from
the City to the College. To build
this road will necessitate widening
ing the Street, and at this meeting
a committee was appointed to see
the property owners along the
raad regarding the mrtter.
sttjrgiTl^ocals
The sick are all improving.
Dr. Tom Greene spent Satur
day in town.
Miss Hah Woodson spent Sun
day at home.
Mr. C. B. Hannah left Mon.
day for the ReUpion.
Miss Maggie Sullivan spent
Saturday in Starkville, shopping.
Miss Edith Sullivan is spend
ine this week with Mrs. Allie
Greene.
Miss Maggie Sullivan attended
the State Teacher’s Association
at Meridian this week.
Mr. Rand Shropshire and Mrs
Jennie Dabbs have been visiting
their moiher this week.
Mrs, Maude Prewitt was a
guest m the home of her aunt,
Mrs. C. B. Hannah, Sunday.
We had quite a little snow
storm Monday. A novel sighi
to many of us. Some of the old.
er people recall a similar storm
in April 1876.
\on are less than nothing, if
you do nothing.
LONGVIEW LOCALS.
*t j_
Miss Ida Richardson relumed
u inn Saturday, where she has
spending a week in the
'ime of her cousin. Mrs. Allie
Hall.
Mrs. Dora Sowell, from Kos
'•insko, was the guest of Mrs.
Nannie Eakin Friday.
Mrs. Ethel King, from Duraqt,
made us a flying trip Thursday
and returned Friday.
Mr. Jack Wallace, Mrs. Fan
nie Richardson’s son in law,
spent Saturday and Sunday with
her.
Mrs. Eula Sanders and Miss
Verna Eakin, were the guest of
Miss Ethel Sanders Friday.
Miss Maggie Shurden spent
a few days here in the home of
her sister. Mrs. Myrtle Fennel,
last week.
Mrs. Allice Ramsey, from town,
spent Sunday in Longview with
relatives.
Mr, Grover Carpenter looked
very “sporty” Sunday, he has
his eye on some girl here. Who
is it, Grover?
Miss Ida Richardson vistited
her aunt, Mrs. Ida Sikes, Sun
day although her “friend,” Mr.
Charlie Montgomery, “accompa
nied” her,
Mr. J, I. Cummins and Mr.
Jack Veazey visited New Hope
Sunday.
Mr. and Mrs. Dolhem departed
for Aberdeen Sunday.
Mr. W. H. N. Seitz made ally
ing trip to Starkville Saturday.
Mrs. Allice Seitz visited her
sister, Mrs. Annie Crow, Salur
day.
It takes more than a corkscrew,
nowaday, to draw a customer’s
order,
A woman is proud of her wed- \
ding ring even if her marriage is a
failure.
In a little country town, the ex
treme in fashion always looks fast.
SENATOR PERCY'S
1 GREAT SPEECH
R,■ ■ m 0
[To Joint Session of the Legisla
| lure of the State of Mia*
| aUffppi April 15, 1910.
| Em. Laßoy Percy addressed a joint
session as follows;
j*Mr. Speaker, Members of the Missieeippi
| Legislature, Felloal -Democrats :
p "X am glad to bo with you again.
Much water has flowed by the mill since
I last stood here art! looked into your
faces, and ft is good to have a chance
to talk with you again,
i "Coming from tihe national eapitoi, 1
can bring you glad tidings for the na
tional Democracy. . The great party that
scarce more than a y*ar ago was swept
into power by n orerwhelming majority,
with a chief executive entering upon the
’duties of his high office under brighter
anepices than evsr attended the inaugu
ration of any previous president, today
is like a rudderless, ehip wallowing in an
angry tempest,
("'"Already from ?dsssisehusetts has come
The triumphant note of Democracy. (Ap
plause.) The Republics U speaker has
been battling for his life b store a Repub
lican house; the president h.se abandoned
the quiet and dignified sechtsion of Ills
great office and is now going hither and
thither pleading and imploring with the
Republicans not to destroy their party.
The leader of the Indiana wing' of the
party has .-already defied and iterated
the established leadens of the Repub
lican party for their broken pledged. -
"Under the curse of its broken tariff
pledge the Republican party realizes it’s
foredoomed to go down in ignominious
defeat, and the reasons that make that
defeat no certain are the reasone ttet
give ve lue and worth to U.
"Why, the bewildered leaders of Jle-
P*'W icanism ask, has this storm swe pt
; do'.vn upon us out of a cloudless sky, be
er.uee we have broken a pledge given to
| the people in the Inst Republican convert
: tionl Why, in all the years gone by we
have never kept party pledges, and midi
a visitation, has never before come upon
net Why, now, are we assailed not only
by our enemies from without but by
those whes have hitherto rallied to the
party cry within T
"They -now know that with the blight
of taetirmalism swept from the country,
with the people viewing the acta of their
itilere with clear eyes, not dimmed by
! passion roor poisoned by peejudicc, the
| intelligen ce and manhood of America is
| asserting itself politically as never be
| fore in l| he history of this country, and
i that thio party, and that any other party
that hold s the reigns of power, is going
to bo hd Id to a stricter accountability
for party pledges than ever heretofore in
our brats iry. And that is what spells
victory, sutured victory, to a triumphant
IVmocrany, the party that lives close to
*h. people and carries out the pledgee
made by It in order to secure an elec
tion, by -vindicating them when that elec
tion has ibeen secured.
Shameless Story.
"But, fellow-Mississippians, while the
great papers have flashed this glad in
; tolllganec abroad to buoy up the hopes of
[ the Democracy of our entire country,
| those same great papers have carried an
; intelligence which has saddened the heart
, and caused the flush of shame to man*
( tie the brow of every Mississippian. The
shameless story has been spread broad
cast over the land that a Mississippi
legislature has been debauched and-cor
rupted by a son of Mississippi. Among,
strangers, seeking as best I could to up
hold the dignity of the state whose com
mission f bore, knowing that that com- [
mission had been won as fairly and as
honorably as any ever held by a son of
Mississippi, knowing that I had entered
| this political struggle through no deaire
i to gratify a personal ambiton, but I bad
east my lot in with those who fought be
cause they believed that Mississippi was
t threatened with a grave disaster in the
.election of James K. Vardaman; know
ing that I had forbidden those who loved
me at home to bear one cent of the ex
pens t except the legitimate expenses that
attend a prolonged stay in the capital,
Thank .Rod, no money has to be spent
lon a JlAlaaiae'-ppi legislature; knowing
i that no .tenfc of my money nor of any
body else fo my Wneflt had been used
to influences the result, i't seemed that the
•cup was a bitter one for me. I had come
from no race of office seekers
[but from me who always held honor
above life, country abovf self; an untar
nished name hitd been handed to me by
. nay forefathers, land it.was my pride and
■y prayer ttet untarnished still that
Mma should- g> from me to tboae who 1
should bear It ' hereafter.
I , Teltgmmf .Cams Thick.
I "Put the Ud%nation that sprung from
ifanonal feelings was swallowed up In
Jha indignation that .gross in me when 1
realised that tha name of the 'state 'Of
i tMaalaaippi was sought to be dragged in
jfcuria at IWirtlM fet fcfllWaM
wandimnent. The telegrams grew thick-1
!er, and the air was full of rumors of
■foul deeds done, lies and slanders, and
jworse than that, the intimation, the sug
gestion, the innuendoes, the unfathered
questions for which no man would stand,
by which it was sought to drag down
the names of those Mississippi has held in
reverence —Anderson, Alexander,, Byrd,
Kyle, Critz and Street, as pure and able
patriots as the state has ever produced.
Their past characters were to be no
shield to the darts of calumny; nay, how
could the living hope to go unscathed
when the new-filled grave afforded no
shield to the character of one who lias
gone from you to his reward since I last
was here with you.
“When the name of Heslip, who but
lately filled a place here and for whom
you dug a grave in the cemetery, was
■to be besmirched by the foul charge that,
because, through honest effort, he had
been able to lift a mortgage that pressed
down upon his home, the means to do it
with must have come into his hands from
polluted sources, and honest men looked
LEROY PERCY,
U. S. Senator from Mississippi.
into each other’s faces and their hearts
grew heavy and the stain of shame
vnounted to their cheeks us they asked
ea,eli other in wonder, can it be that sons
of .Mississippi have stained for political
gain the name of Mississippi t
1 “Tliv'u came your investigation, the
most sea rcling that a legislature has ever
made, where neither time nor expense
were spares 1 , and then at the end of it
there is left standing on the stage a mark
f,lf the acorn a’id contempt of all honest
men (applause)—-only one figure, a char
acterless man, a sec (-confessed liar, a self
accused bribe-taker, and ilia only ally, a
poor, broken-down, slhrmeless woman of
th streets. Every refutable witness
named in corroboration had shrunk back
a (Trig'll ted ns if from contamination by
touching'; this moral leper.
And high above the pit of ahav'ie, as a
star in the sky, floats the honor <of Mis
sissippi, above the reach of the hands
that would drag it down for polUitMi
gain.
No Stain on His Honor.
“Your investigation has shown to the
world that no stain rests upon the com
mission that you have given to me; no
suspicion of reproach upon tire integrity
of the legislature of the state of Missis
sippi, or upon a single one of the eighty
seven votes that were cast in my favor.
(Applause.)
“I know that that commission was
fairly won; the legislature of the state of
Mississippi knows Hint the commission
was honestly won; the people of the
stnte of Mississippi know that that com
mission was fairly won (applause), and
yet broadcast over the land kits been
spread tiro poison by which it is hoped
t.u close tlie cars of reason among Hie
people of the state of Mississippi. They
have iwn told that through the secret
caucus, disregarding the facts that every
senator that ever represented the state
of Mississippi, sent from a legislative
hall, was sent by a secret caucus—that
through Lite secret caucus the will of Hie
people of tlic state of Mississippi lias
been thwarted and the expression of their
choice been pre vented.
“I deny that. I say that the same rca
sons that made the legislature of the
[ state of Mississippi repudiate Vardaman
, ism make the profile of the state of Mis
! sissippi willing and desirous of repudi
j nting Vardamanism because they are
weary of the senseless agitation and
strife-breeding (applause); and I say I
am prepared to maintain that before th*
people of the stnte, and I say, further
mere, that I am anxious for the upper
tunity of maintaining it and asserting it
at the earliest moment before flie peopl*
of my state. (Applause.)
No Office Without Honor.
“Vo man prize* more highly the honor
of renresent ing .Mississippi in the senate
of the United States than I do. Hut it
is only Inxansc I believe I can work for
' the Welfare of the state, and it is only
because that I liar* the trust and confi
dence of the people of tile state of Mis
aissippi behind me (applause), and when
ever'l find that I have not that trust and
confidence, then I no longer desire to
serve the people in official capacity.
’’•lfvery dictate of patriotism calls for
wp early Settlement of this senatorial
question by the people of Mississippi. It
is not for the welfare of Mississippi that
this fight, which promises to tie a hitter
I fight, shall lie a long drawn out fight, ar-
I raying the good people of this state, in
j hostile camps against each other, along
factional lines which it will take genera
: tiorts to obliterate and to efface. What
-1 ever advantage in this fight might come
> me personally, through delay, naught
hut. harm eould come to the welfare of
Imy state; And never shall it be aaid my
personal fortunes weighed aught with me
in the scales against my state’* well
.heieg, (Applause.)
“I want to say that instead of wanting
his primary do come off in August, mf
I I It)*’* *nd Challenge Mr, Yardema'te
co-operate with n • and hav (his J
mary come off in N vember, igxo. (w
plause continued )
•‘Kor fifteen year Vardaman hai )u
the song of the of;, e-seeker to the m
pie of Mississippi a ! he i familiar win
every nook and corner of the stnte ui
naught can come to him by a longer cu
VBBS. ■ ,1
“I am unknown to ttantsn(!i of tk
people of Mississippi, but I am prepM
to go before that people and defend tk
integrity and honor of the legU!jt
of the state of Mississippi (repeated u
plause), and to vindicate thoir Intel}
gence when they said that the people 4
the state are weary of Vardainanism,
Appeals to the People.
“I would have been before the legi*
lature at an earlier date and made thii
proposition when it eould have been
framed into legislation, as can lie do
now if the legislature would hold until
the middle of next week, but I couU
not come here, with this investigation
progressing, because I wanted the truth
brought out without any claim that I,b
my presence, had in any way swayed
or influenced those who were coiuluclb
the investigation.
“But I ask of this legislature a joig
resolution requesting (because the lip
lature believes it best for the welfnn
the state of Mississippi) the Democrats
state executive committee to fix a pti.
mary to be held between the fint itj
and the last day of November, ItlO, tt
name the senator whom they desin ti
fill the long term in the United Statu
senate beginning March 4, 1913.
“Governor Vardanian, of course, wiß
have to concur in that request, for |
will he a primary held by consent n|
binding those who consent to it. Bid
when that primary is ordered by a Den*
eratic committee and the Democrats o(
the state of Mississippi Express their
choice in 1910, the nomination of that
choice'in the primary of 1911 will be bd
a simple formality. No one can doubt it
“I said that I only valued the comitia
sion from the state of Mississippi wbea
the confidence and trust of the people 1
the state went witli that commiukg
and I want to say to you now that if th
people of the state of Mississippi in that
primary shall say that .1. K. V rdamu
or any other son of Mississippi is the
choice for the long term, tire commiaak
that I hold from the state, at the fin)
legislature that convenes after that pri
mary, will lie placed with my resignatla
in the hands of that legislature (ap
plause), and my support and the np
port of my friends will be given in thal
legislature for the election of the ohok
of the people to the short unexpin
term, as well as the long term in U
United States senate. (Applause.) -
Want Joint Debate.
“Now, if Governor Vardamnn eoncui
in this request, and 1 have no desire (
force any vote on the subject until ki
friends have hnd opportunity to craii
with him, I shall request of him, 11
it now, and I shall expect of him to mu
rne in joint discussion before the p(l
of the state of Mississippi (repeatedly
plause), and I will there defend beta
file people of the state the commlnk
that this legislature has honored ■
with, or I will place that commiuk
at the disposal of the people of the state
(Applause repeated.) When I reprel
Mississippi in the senate of the Unit)
States, I will not only want to ki
that the commission la ataiuieys; U
legislature of the state of MiuiMfl
not only want to know, but I want tl
world to know that I hold on the dm
of the United States senate 1 stsinlm
commission (applause), and I now chsl
lenge Governor Vardanian to the a
eeptance of this primary In 1910, ope
to any Mississlppian that desire* t a
ter it, and will he bound by it, and sup
port the nominee of it.
"I thank you, gcntleemn.’’ (Applause
SENATOR PERCY’S NOMINATION
Unanimously Declared Fair and Squfl
by House and Senate.
Before adjourning and while ewHi*
the final message from the goversH
Mr. Cavett, of Noxubee, one of the W*
effective and kindly spirits in the repr*
sentstive body, and a strong support'
of Governor Vardaman, sent th* folio*
ing resolution to the desk:
‘•Resolved by the house of rcpreienh
tdvast
“In view of the scandalous rum*
which have been circulated touching *
recent senatorial contest, the house •
representatives takes pleasure in say**
to the people of Mississippi that wi
convinced that the conduct of every •
didate in the senatorial contest wei (
njfied, honorable .and upright, tnd tt*
•o mote in th* .caucus pwfW’* 4 '* ll *'
procured by say mb proper mean* M M
nipt influence, and that the ejects I
Senator Percy is free from fraud of 0
ruption.
“And regardless of whether * ■*
supported Senator Percy in the recent**
tent or will support him in the ipprtM
ing primary, we record with
our confidence in his ehivalroui M*
and personal and political intigrity,,' 1 *
our desire to hold up his hands in■■
performance of hia high duties as a ij
rcSentativc of this great commonweslr
In th* senate of the United State*.”
This resolution (truck • rciponlirt
chord in the heart of every mat
hearing and was adopted iponUnk*l
and unanimously.
A like resolution w*s
passed in the senate <n motion of fif
ator W. T. McDonald, who wrt <** ’
counsel selected by Bilbo to rejod***
him in the senate invartigation. Ss®***
McDonald also voted to expel BUN*, *
also did Senator MeMUltn, the floef F**
gor of Vardamaa’a force* in th*
and other prominent oenator* wlo
V a3*sifc

xml | txt