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The progressive farmer and southern farm gazette. (Starkville, Miss.) 1910-1920, May 06, 1911, Image 1

Image and text provided by Mississippi Department of Archives and History

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87065610/1911-05-06/ed-1/seq-1/

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FIRST CULTIVATION OF THE COTTON CROP—PAGES 2 and 3.
Ly> A Farm and Home Weekly for the States of Mississippi,
^ ' Alabama, Louisiana, Arkansas, and Tennessee.
> P. F. Tltlf.Rf g’d. B. S.1 —
Patent Oltice. JFOUNDED. 1895. BY DP. TAIT BUTLER, AT STAPKVILLE. MISS.
olnme XVL No. 18.SATURDAY, MAY, 6, 1911.Weekly: $1 a Year.
rA Vnuncf fntalna A Locust 20 Years Old.
Thrifty Forest Growth. A Young Latalpa.
I Take Care of The Farm Woodlot.
(Southern FARMERS are just beginning to realize the value
^ of their woodlands and to appreciate the fact that timber is
a crop, the same as cotton or corn, differing from them in tne
long time necessary for it to come to the harvest, but requiring
to be propagated and cared for just as they do. The prevalent
mania for clearing lands has resulted in many farms being
entirely without a timber supply, and this is always unfortunate.
The farm should have enough woodland at least to supply its
needs in the way of posts, firewood, lumber for fencing ana re
pairs, etc. A small acreage will, if properly handled, give an
annual harvest of considerable value, and may be kept productive
and even increased in value. , „
. Prof. W. J. Green in the Ohio Farmer, by courtesy of which we
Publish the accompanying pictures, makes the following recom
mendations:
»• exclude live stock in order to protect me jy»«
as well as the trees which are to be planted, and to save t
mulch which will be blown away, if the small trees and shrubs are
destroyed. 2. Protect against fire. 3. Permit no indiscriminate
cutting of thrifty young trees of good species and us®
arge trees so as to avoid damaging valuable ones, both la g
small. 4. In some cases large trees need to be removed, n
to save them before decay sets in, and for the good of the y K
trees. 5 in most woodlots there are “weed trees , ,
"ever yield timber of any value, besides they a*e shading \ aiuame
young trees. 6. Thinning may need to be done where growth is
reta'ded bv serious crowding. 7. Planting may need to be done
ln 01*der to fill open spaces, so that the ground may be iuiiy
Died 8. Where fire has run through timoer u may ue necessary
to cut many trees of small size and allow them to sprout; also to do
more or less planting. 9. In case there is good reason to cut most
of the large trees, nlanting should be done at once, before the
ground becomes sodded.
It is just as foolish to waste timber as any other farm product,
and it is just as unwise to get half returns from the woodlot as
from the pasture or the cultivated fields. A little thought and
care along this line would be worth much to a great many of our
readers.____
EIGHT FEATURES OF THIS ISSUE.
CORN AND SOY BEANS—Raise Enough Feed This Year. 4 1
CULTIVATION — PULVERIZATION—l ine the Soil und It Will
Hold More Moisture and the Plants Get More Food. ID
FARM WORK FOR MAY.—Prof. Massey Tells What to Do in
Field and Garden .
FIRST CULTIVATION OF THE COTTON CROP—How to Kill
the Grass Before It Starts. •*
HARMFULNESS OF THE “HARMLESS" FLY—Some Facts Which
Should Induce You to Screen Your Windows. H
HOW INDIA’S MILLIONS LIVE—A Land Where Life is a Cease
less Struggle for Food... **
HOW TO FEED THE BROOD MARE—Many Poor Colts Are the
Direct Results of Poor Feeding . 1U
HOW THE TORRENS SYSTEM WILL HELP THE FARMER—
Put This Matter Up to Your Candidates for the Legislature IK

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