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The Starkville news. (Starkville, Miss.) 1902-1960, October 25, 1918, Image 1

Image and text provided by Mississippi Department of Archives and History

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87065612/1918-10-25/ed-1/seq-1/

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THE STARKVILLE NEWS.
VOL. XVli
SOUTHEAST HEDGES IN FRANCE
• GET SUPPLIES AT LESS THAN
WHOLESALE PRICES OVER HERE
RED TRIANGLE SHOULDERS EXPENSE OF TRANSPORTATION FROM
MANUFACTURERS TO CANTEENS IN FRANCE—SYSTEM
REDUCED TO FINAL BASIS AND RESULTS
t NOW ARE VERY GRATIFYING.
The Americans overseas with Pershing have facilities for combattting
the high cost of living that are absolutely beyond the reach of civilians on
this side of the Atlantic. Even their small luxuries, such as tobacco, bis
cuits, cakes and similar articles, are obtainable at prices that are consid
erably lower than those charged by retailers in American cities.
This is made possible because the Army and Navy Y. M. C. A. has taken
over all post exchanges In France at the direct request of General Pershing,
so that the Hed Triangle Is now conducting the greatest business enterprise
the world.
Tobacco and other “suplementary” supplies are distributed to the boys
In khaki at exactly wholesale prices. The “Y” makes not a penny of profit
and even shoulders the financial loss entailed by footing the bills for trans
portation from the manufacturer to the canteens at the front.
The American troopers can buy Fatima cigarettes for 50 centimes, or
about 8 cents; Camels, 35 centimes, or about 6 cents; Sweet Caporals, 20
centimes, or about 3 cents; Lucky Strikes, 30 centimes, or about 5 cents;
Murads, G 5 centimes or about J 1 cents; Bull Durham, 25 centimes, or about
4 cents; Prince Albert, 40 centimes, or about 7 cents; Velvet, 30 centimes,
or about 5 cents; Star Chewing, 35 centimes, or about 6 cents.
' Capt. George M. Lynch, former assistant commandant at the Florida
Military College, Gainesville, Fla., but now in the Red Triangle Service, has
made several trips overseas and has investigated thoroughly the conditions exist
ing in the post exchanges under Y. M. C. A. management. He declares that
while some difficulty was experienced at first, prices have been stabilized
and the boys are getting their supplies at cost.
, #•
Designed Southeast Hostess Houses
Miss Katherine C. Budd, of New York (left), who designs the hostess
houses of the Southeastern Department, now engaged in supervising the
construction of one at Dorr Field, near Arcadia, Fla. Miss Gertrude Mayo,
of New York and Boston architect for other Y. \V. C. A. buildings at mili
tary establishments.
MEANS $
smt nr m uss is
MEN’S and BOYS’ CLOTHING
ROSSOFF’S NEW STOCK NOW
EEADT
It is something different. It is not the cheaply
made, ill fitting kind.
IT IS CLASSY AND DISTINCTIVE.
MADE BY THE BEST.TAILORS.
MADE OP THE BEST FABRICS.
MADE FOR STYLE, MADE TO FIT AtfD
NOTHING IS A PIT BUT A PERFECT FIT.
We are proud of our new line of Fall and Winter
Clothing, and our stock is large enough to select a
perfict fit from, and we have all styles and grades.
The Prices Arc Right.
m. rqssqffT^*,
Redeem your W. S. S. PLEDGE^
STAKKVILLE MISSISSIPPI, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 25,1918
UNITED STATER
FOOD ADMINISTRATION
MISSISSIPPI DIVISION
■ y HARPER LEIPER,
Field Representative.
THE NEW HOME CARD.
After a conference this summer with
representatives of the allied Countries,
and a consideration of the whole food
©supply, the United
States Food Admin
istration has come to
the conclusion that
present to the Amer.
c o n s e r vatlon mes
sage for the season 1918-19.
The United States Food Administra
tion Is having a Home Card printed
for every home In the State of Missis
sippi for distribution the week begin
ning December Ist. Full realization of
every Individual of his or her duty
with regard to the war will arouse
them to a sense of their duty to con
serve food to help win the war.
■Such a test applied In our daily lives
will define how we can each person
ally assist i meeting our opportuni
ties, and fulfill our obligations to our
own boys and our allies.
Mr. Hoover has said that the war
can be won, and will be won next
year, if the American people, out of
their food economies, will save the
I'ood necessary to maintain the allied
civilian population.. If we fail to sup
ply the necessary food for shipment,
and the war is prolonged to 1920, it
will cost one million American lives
more. To meet this requirement the
United States is asked to reduce the
consumption of breadstuffs one-half
each week per person, that is, to eat
one-half less of breadstuffs made fr*nu
all kinds of different grains.
Mr. Hoover has further said that
wo can bring this dreadful business to
an end by every man, woman and child
testing every action by this one touch
stone—does it contribute to winning
the war?
America must literally feed the
world during the war and arthe same
time prepare to rebuild the world's
food supplies when victory brings
peace.
Meals Served Up-To-Date In
at All Hours Every Particular !
(O]C
BELL CAFE
STARKVILLE MISS.
FOR LADIES ft GENTLEMEN
TX7HHN in town take your meals at the
BELL CAFE. Everything Clean
and Sanitary.
OYSTERS
Extra Selects, Plants,
15c Per Dozen 20c Per Dozen
*
Complete Line of Tobaccos.
Our Soft Drinks are pure.
We Strive to Please You.
prompt Service Phone 181
—-— - - _
We carried the 1918 objectives—
wheat, meat, fat and sugar—and now
we are settling down to a steady push
all along the line.
Your grocer is pledged to full cooper
ation in the food administration pro
gram. Are you helping him to keep
that pledge?
Clean up the home pantry before
calling on the national pantry.
If we have sugar by spoonfuls we
can send it by shipfuls to “our boys."
FOOB REGULATIONS FOR
PUBLIC EATING PUCES
_The new war program for hotels,
restaurants, clubs, dining car# auid
steamships, will soon be issued to the
©public eating places
throughout the Unit
ed States. It has not
been thought neoes
cense the operators
. places, but.lt Is nec
essary to have all places where foods
are served observe strict conservation
rules, so that we may meet our prom
ises to increase our exports of food
60 % oter last year’s shipments.
This new war program for public
eating places contains twelve general
orders, which are very positive In
their demands, and will no doubt be
the means of saving much food. Watch
for It.
WHY OUR PEOPLE SHOULD CON.
SERVE SUGAR IN THE UNITED
#TATEB.
Before the war Great Britain receiv
ed half her sugar from Germany and
Austria. France obtained 30% from
these sources. Now the United States
must divide her portion with these two
countries.
The sugar situation is an outcome of
war conditions, and must be met as
such. We may expect rationing of
sugar to continue until the war is over.
It is necessary for the soldiers to be
suDolled with a greater Quantity of
sugar tnan those wiio are' wen avam
and not exposed to out-of-door firing.
Therefore you should suffer no hard
ship In giving up a small quantity of
your sweets to supply the needs of our
army and our allies. You can
Ize the fruit Vendor Instead of the
candy man.
The American people hare taught
themselves new hahlts In their rela
tionship to food, now they must teach
themselves to abstain from much of
the food to which they hare becom*
accustomed.
Our associates in the war, In conti
nental Europe, will receive through thg
United States Food Administration
their entire sugar supply, and this will
Involve even closer scrutiny of distri
bution and supply In America. The
fact that eiiffee will be difficult to se
cure will serve lo emphasize alee the
mportance of not wasting it
Dr, Hunter Scales is able to
be out again alter having been
confined with a severe ease of
Spanish Influenza.
MVAStedP
j at STARKVILLE, MISS.
AH Kinds Of
JUNK
{ For iron and bones, 50c per
hundred pounds.
The highest market prices
paid for Rags, Brass, Cop
per, and all kinds of metal.
Also, Hides, Wool,Beeswax,
Tallow, Rubber and Sacks.
Wm. Sheinblum,
in rear of Blumenfeld &
Pried, Slarkville, Miss.
NO. 26

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