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The Tupelo journal. (Tupelo, Miss.) 1876-1924, March 01, 1907, Image 1

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87065632/1907-03-01/ed-1/seq-1/

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THE TUPELO JOURNAL.
51.50 per A^um. " HK ,rU8T ANJ.) FKA.lt NOT. " _’_31'5° per .
VOI. XXXIV TUPELO. MISSISSIPPI. FRIDAY MARCH I, 1907_NUMBER 49
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I Once ^^^^HflBflB
v,
A visit i
Implements I
Guano ~' j
ITS UP TO US to sell the goods all we want is a chance,
I Try Us Before Buying Elsewhere
We have everything in Hardware, Mill Supplies, Etc. Telephones and Electric
Supplies, Everything need to construct “Rural” telephone lines. Sash, Doors,
Paints, Oils and Roofing.
“We are the People who appreciate Your Patronage”
f Trice-Raymond Hardware Co.
“FRAUD.” I
“WHO SAID DOEBUCK?”
Chicago Mail Order Prices Against Tupelo Prices.
Get your “Yaller Back Fake Book” anti see how you get “skinned,” Mail Order
Buyers.
" CHICAGO MAIL ORDER PRICES. TUPELO PRICES.
Pa*e20!>. No. 120700. Mandolin, price $1.05, Express 80e,—$2.75.$2.25
211, No. 12G822, 39 Bracket Banjo, $5.75, Express 75c,— $G.50 6.25
“ 213, No. 12G900, 3 Bar Autoharp, $1.95, Express 45c,— $2.20 2.10
“ 219, No. 12G1604, Hohner Marine Band, 19c, postage 6c,—25c 25c
“ 219, No. 12G1610, Honner’s Chimewood, 38c, postage 7c, 45c 45c
“ 220! No. 12G1804, Harmonica Holder, 30c, postage 7c,—37c.35c
“ 228^ No. 12G4125, Mueller’s Eternelle Violin Strings, 8c, postage ^
“ 228, No. 12G4190, Bell Brand Vio. Strgs., set, lie, post 5c,—16c.15c
“ 22S! No. 12G4289, Bell Brand Gui. Strgs,set,23c, post 7c,—30c.25c
“ 228’, No. 12G4529, Violin Case, 78c, express 50c,—$1.28.$1.25
“ 229’, No. 12G4622, Violin Bridge, 3c, postage lc,—4c.-.3c
“ 229.’No. 12G4674, Violin Bow Rosin, 5c, postage 2c, 7c.5c
“ 229,'No. 12G5186, Guitar Tail Piece, 5c, postage 5c, 10c .10c
“ 203 No. 12G306, Maginni Violin Outfit, $5.50, ex 75c,—$6.25.$6.00
“ 208,’. No. 1-G308, Strad. “ “ 7.25, ex. 75c,— 8.00. 7.75
“ 229, No 12G5225, Capo D’Astro, 13e, postage 3c, —16c 15c.
We are satisfied with this profit, and will pay postage on any of the above
mentioned small articles to out-of-town purchasers.
We will sell you anything in the Music Line from a lc Mandolin Pick to a $50,
000 Pipe Organ, and that at 10 per cent, to 15 per cent, under any “Mail Order
House” in existence. Make us prove it.
_
‘‘Our Profit Enriches Your County.”
SKIPPER & LAWRASON;
EVERYTHING IN MUSIC.
; j . -v - P • | ;
i«n» mmmmm _
| FEED YOUR LAND
with our Fertilizers because they are High
Grade and will
MAKE MORE
to the acre than any other brands on the
market and you wiil
SAVE MORE
in labor and teams than you made before
using them
TENNESSEE VALLEY FER
TILIZER CO.
FLORENCE, ALABAMA.
Habit
3 the easier
Cent INTEREST
keeps piling up. TODAY! Never mind how little.
Save something, hence you will wonder why you
didn’t start sooner.
>
•jMMMMMMHaMWV Of • - . 'W»M»—* Mil — I ■! IIWW——
Get the Habit!
Saving is a matter of habit. Teach
your children to save. Habits ac
quired in childhood are the ones that
stick through life. Call and get
one of our
Home Savings Banks
and start an account with $1.00.
We pay 4 per cent, interest, com
pounded Quarterly on Savings ac
counts.
Peoples Bank & Trust Co.
B. T. CLARK, SHELBY TOPP, J- M CLARK.
Pres. V-Pres. | Cashier
BANK OF TUPELO
TUPEOL MISS.
CAPITAL STOCK S100.000.oo.
This bank stands for conservatism and consistent
liberality. Its facilities for handling carefully and
promptly all matters pertaining to the banking bus
iness of the citizens of the city of Tupelo and of Lee
and Itawamba crudities are. unsurpassed.
Bring your deposits to this bank where your mo
ney will be absolutely safe, and is subject to check
at any time.
Open a Savings Account with us. Our Savings
Department is conducted along strictly up-to-date
lines. 4 per eent. per annum paid quarterly.
Don’t keep your money at home, where a thief
may get itjdon’t bury it‘in the ground,where it may
soon be found; don’t carry it on your person,because
you may be killed for it. But bring it to us where
thief or murderer cannot break in and steal it.
You may need money. Leave your money with
us in the fall and winter. Draw it out in the spring
if y'.u need it. If you need more in the summer
than you have, we will take care of your wants.
DEPOSIT YOUR MONEY
WITH THIS BANK. . .
BANK OF TUPELO]
“Star’5 Is The Password
“Star” is the password to every man’s good fellow
ship, simply because it is recognized everywhere as the
best chew made.
You could offer no chew so rich, sweet, juicy and
substantial as
STAR
PLUG CHEWING TOBACCO
Other kinds may seem cheaper from their size and
price, but “Star” always proves the r» >st economical
chew, because the choice, ripe, substantial leaf in “Star |
chews waxy, sweet and juicy—twice as long as most
chews.
“Star” is still, as for forty years, the same full/
weight 16 oz. plug, the same high quality, the same
popular price.
No wonder “Star” sales equal the sales of any five
other kinds!
150,000,000 loc. pieces sold annually
In All Stores
M ...
Commission on the
Race Question.
(Jackson Cor. Commercial Appeal.)
Jackson, Miss., Feb. 20, ’07.—
Gov. Vardanian has received a
great many inquiries recently as
to whether or not he would ap
point three members from Mis
sissippi on a commission to be
appointed by the governors of
the Southern States for the pur
pose of studying the race ques
tion in the South, as suggested
b-y the Rev. Dr. John E. White,
of Atlanta, Ga. Answering these
inquiries, the governor said:
“I have not thought much
about the matter of appointing
mombers of that commission for
Mississippi. Such a commission,
if composed of the right sort of
men, could do no harm, and
and probably might do some
good. Intelligent thought and
discussion is always helpful. But
the race question cannot be set
tled by a commission: and what
ever determination or conclusion
such a commission might reach,
the issue will still exist. Its ex
istence is not dependent upon
what any number of individuals
may think of it or say about it.
Its origin is not in the brains of
statesmen, politicians, or polit
ical economists or candidates for
office, but rather, it grows out
of donditions, the unfortunate
result of racial peculiarities and
governmental mistakes. And
you might as well undertake to
control or direct the blowing of
the winds or the ebbing or flow
ing of the tides, which are 'the
results of natural laws, as to un
dertake to suppress or prevent
the discussion of the race ques
tion in the South. It is with us,
the problem is here, and will re
main here until the causes which
produced it shall be removed,
It belongs to the whole people
and the whole people must settle
it. And, ultimately, the people
will settle it.
“As far as I am concerned, I
prefer to trust the feeliftgs of
the whole people than the con
clusions of a commission com
posed of specialists appointed by
the governors or anyone else.
The mass of the people may
think slowly, but they think ac
curately and their conclusions
are usually correct. The organ
izations of ‘press clubs’ for the
discouragement of the discussion
of the question, or failure of gov
ernors to appoint this commis
sion for the same purpose, will
have just about as much effect
in keeping the people from talk
ing about it and discussing it as
telling a hungry man that he is
not hungry would satisfy the
cravings of his stomach'
“They may cry harmony, but
there is no harmony. They may
say there is no problem, but still
the yroblem is here. They may
say there is no race question,but
the race question is with us. The
Christian Science treatment will
not suit this case at all. Differ
ences of opinion as to remedy
may be expected, but there can
be no difference of opinion as to
the existing, living, distressing
facts in the case. And it is pas
sing strange to me that wise and
conservative men in other mat
ters should entertain such pecu
liar views on this particular ques
tion af are entertained by some.
If I should not appoint commis
sioners for Mississippi I want it
distinctly understood that it will
not be because I do not want the
matter* discussed,”
nws trains
TUPELO.
SOUTHBOUND.
No 1 Exprees daily lv - - 11:10 p m
No 3 Havana Lim daily lv - 9:28 a m
No 5 Express daily lv - - 10:25 a m
No 11 (Week days) lv - - 3:00 p m
NORTHBOUND.
No 2 Express daily lv - ^ - 6:13 a m
No 4 Havana Lim daily lv - 8:00 p m
No 6 Express daily lv - - 4.45 p m
No 12 (Week days) lv - - 10:25 am
Wanted
831 tons of Scrap Iren, 113 tons
Capper ai d Brass, 67 tons old Rubber
boots and shoes, and gold and silver in
unlimited quantifies.
Witherspoon,
Announcements.
In this issue will be found the name
of Mr. VV. L). MeGaughy of Ve/ona
who authorizes us to say that he is n
candidate for sujiervisor for the fourth
district of Lee county. Mr. McGaugbey
was reared in the county and is one of
the most substantial and upright citi
! zens of the county lie is a a |*:n tical
man of first class bnsines^(|iialilications
and capable of making the county an
acceptable anti faithful supervisor. He
would be pleased to have the support of
the voters of the fourth district.
In our announcement column will In
found the name of Geo. II. Hill, Jr.,
who enters the race for representative
from Lee county Mr. Hill has just
completed the course in the law depart
merit of the*University of Mississippi
and has been admitted to the practice
of law He is a man of fine sense
and full abreast of the times in all
matters looking to the best interest of
the state and county. Should the peo
pie send Mr. Hill to Jackson as their
representative he would reflect credit
on the county and gain the encomuims
of his fellow citizens.
One of Lincoln’s favorite sto
ries concerned Daniel Webster.
Webster was. when a schoolboy,
one day called before the teacher
for some infraction of the rules.
Told to hold out his right hand
for “feruling," the lad reluct
antly put forth a decidedly grimy
paw. “Daniel," said the dis
gusted pedagogue, “if you will
find in this schoolroom another
hand as filthy as that, I will let
you off this time.” Instantly
from behind the lad’s back came
his left hand. “Here it is, sir,"
was the ready response of the
future orator. —Ex.
■■ — m-—
The strong protest which Tole
do, Ohio is making over the pro
posed appointment of a negro as
collector of internal revenue,
clearly demonstrates the fact
that the professed interest of the
people of Ohio for the negro is
for political purposes only.
Crane-Moore
On last Sunday evening at the home
of the bride’s parents on church street,
the ceremony was said which united in
marraige Mr. G. M. Crane and Miss
Bessie Moore, only a few of the rela
tives and friends of the contracting
parties being present. The ceremony
was said by Rev. K. A Kimbrough,
pastor of the Baptist church, in his
usual impressive style. The marriage
came as quite a surprise to the many
friends of the young couple, who let
only a few of their most intimate
friends into the secret.
The bride is the charming and accom
plished daughter of Mr. and Mrs. M. L.
Moore, and has resided in Tupelo sev
eral years, where she has won many
friends by her charming personally and
sweet disposition.
Mr. Crane is a young man of exem
plary habits and sterling worth and
holds a position as manager of the In
dependent Telephone Company at this
place During his four years of resi
dence here he has ingratiated himself
into the esteem and confidence of the
people by his affable manners and strict
attention to business.
Wo join their many friends in wish
ing for the happy young couple a pleas
ant and profitable voyage through life.
0 ___ — _
We are sorry, indeed, to learn of the
deaths of Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Pvles.
parents of Dr. Pyles of Siltillo, which
sad (‘vents occured at their home in
Pontotoc county Iasi week, both deaths
being occasioned by measles. - 't lie
i death of Mrs. Pyle occurred on W ed
nesday and that of her husband on toe
I Friday following. Deceased were mem
| hers of one the oldest and most prom
inent families of Pontotoc county.
! They were both devout Christians, al
ways striving to follow in the footsteps
1 of their Master. Their deaths have
; cast a deep gloom over the entire com
munity in which they resided. Rev. J.
H. Jenkins, of the Baptist Church, con
ducted the funeral services, speaking
, in a touching manner of the exemplary
lives of the departed.
, Mr. and Mrs. A. G. Hurlbert were
called to Okolona last Saturday by the
: death of Mr. Hurlbert’s grandmother,
Mrs. Waters, who had reached the ad
vanced age of 82 years.
Frank Dudley, with a superb compa
ny, opened a five night's engagement
at the Opera House here last Tuesday
night and have played to a full house
each successive night. They will pre
. sent“Dr. Jekvl and Mr. Hyde.’’tonight
j Matinee Saturday afternoon, nad
closing engagement Saturday night.
MULES
Just received a car 'oad of fine Mules
ages ranging from three to five years,
weighing from 850 to 1,000 pounds.
I All well broke and perfectly sound, will
! sell as low as possible. Call at Burke’s
| old lumber yard, rear of the Tupelo
j Mercantile ComDany.
Wm. Wigginton
Tupelo, Miss., Feb. 23rd, 19e7
I COUNTY TELEPHONE SERVICE.
j
The Cumberland Telephone & Tele
graph Co. wishes to operate in connec
tion with its exchanges in the country
a county system and to this end request
| the farmers of the country to give it an
opportunity of presenting to them its
plans for the service. By the use of
the greatest of modern inventions, the
farmer can at a minimum cost to him
self keep in touch with the markets and
on the days that the highest prices are
offered for the products of his farm he
can be reached over the telephone by
his merchants or by his confidential ad
visor and thus frequently in one trans
action save more than the cost of his
telephone service for an entire year.
The farmers in this section are invited
to confer with the Company’s nearecs
local manager, or to make their wants
known directly to the execut've rffice at
Nashville, Tenn.
CUMBERLAND TELEPHONE AND
1 *■ TELEGRAPH CO.
*

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