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The Tupelo journal. (Tupelo, Miss.) 1876-1924, November 11, 1910, Image 3

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87065632/1910-11-11/ed-1/seq-3/

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A WILYJRIENTAL
_„ Guile of a Tricky Native Snake
Charmer In India. u ..
''v_
i r mi
GATHERED IN THE SERPENTS.
m, - \
It W«« No Troubl# to Him to Luro tho
Reptile* Into Hi* Baakat, and tho
Supply Wa* In No Danger of Giving
Out and Losing Him a Job.
Among the numerous objectionable
and dangerous creatures peculiar to
the orleut none is more repulsive than
the suake. One shudders involuntarily
as-one thinks of its wiggling body and
vicious characteristics. During my
residence in India I never felt safe
from its presence. I had my closets,
bed and even my bathtub searched ev
orv day lest one should be found colled
up in some corner, writes b<liza Iv.
Van Bergen in the Christian Intelli
gencer.
I was always on the watch for the '
creatures and ever in mortal terror of
treading on one. It never occurred to
me to sleep without a light, and a
stick was always near at hand lest I
might find one unawares and be un
f firepured to meet it. ! even looked
ii|K)U my thin mosquito curtain as a
slight protection, for It would at least
break its fall should a snake tumble
down suddenly from the ceiling.
I he creatures have a decided pref- ’
erouce for cool, damp places and often
choose the bathroom and sometimes
tlie tub for their habitation, much to
the discomfort of its rightful habitue.
It is not unalloyed bliss to live iu a
place infested with serpents. With
•filch formidable enemies, oue never
forgets to be cautions, nor to guard
against their presence and sudden at
tack. It makes oue alert to be in the
midst of danger and adds spice to life.
Well, ns i started out to say, my
garden was infested with snakes, and
I was persuaded to have a native
charmer summoned to lure them
away. His hideous occupation, weird
incantations and strange pets sur
round the snake charmer with a pe
culiar fascination. His magnetism
and skill are considered phenomenal
in the. east.
This specimen was tall and lank and
had deep, cavernous eyes and an ab
stracted air. Some of the creatures
were coiled around his wrist, which
made him still mere repellant. He
handled them ns if they were per
fectly harmless. About the neck lie
wore a chain with a fluie attached.
Two other jugglers accompanied him.
similarly attired, but minus the
snakes. One carried a dosed basket
on his arm.
lie stopped at a respectful distance
to make his “salaam." which is the
customary salute of the country. Then
he approadied the aloe hedge which
indosed my grounds, squatted himself
' tailor fashion on the grass and began
to produce weird, plaintive sounds on
the flute, to which music the reptiles
entwined themselves around him and
seemed to sway their bodies to and
fro.
~ After ftme time a snake appeared,
gliding slowly and stealthily out from
the hedg* toward the spot where it
heard tl^6 enchanting music. The
charmer allowed it to come quite
close and (to wind Itself around his
arm. Another followed and yet an
other, whilje the other two men stood
by holding/ a basket ready to receive
them as f*oon ns they unwound them
selves. ,At least a half dozen ap
peared n<nd were disposed of iu this
manner. After being captured they
appeared as ijr in a stupor.
Horrified wfth his performance, I
begged him toJ stop and bade him
leave the plntfe. lie assented and.
picking up the’, basket, departed with
the snakes without ever ceasing to
play his uncanny} tune. His coinpan
ious gathered up' the rest or ms ue
longiugs and followed him. I paid a
certain sum for/eath snake thus dis
patched. ,
He came repeatedly thereafter and
went through tfoe same performance,
conjuring up more Reptiles and dispos
ing of them In the^ame way until 1
began to suspect isome trickery. He
refused to allow tylie snakes to be kill
ed. insisting that they were sacred and
must not be put tfo death. It looked
as if he replaced the snakes in the
hedge after removing them, and thus
he multiplied ttoeir number and in
creased his gainst.
I was finally farced to have him re
moved by ihe po'Jico and threatened
with punishment ifa order to keep him
away. Nothing wo hid persuade me to
permit one of the feillows to enter my
premises again. \
-y.
Ampjfy Qualified.
Proud Parent—If you would win my
daughter, young man. you must prove
> my satisfaction that you have forti
.. tude. patience under discouraging cir
cumstances. strength of character,
courage, an indomf.table will to suc
ceed and. above all. an ability to bear
with misfortune. Hart? you those qual
ifications? Suitor—I've known your
daughter for some tim/e. sir. and am
asking you for her haijd. Do you wish
other assurances? ;r
Good Cause For It.
“A friend of mine 'who visits that
newly married couple sajw the husband
the other day throwing stones at his
i wife." 1
S“Good heavens: Was she hurt?"
“Not a bit or it. Slje was Just tickled
jo death. They ✓’Were diamonds.”—
Baltimore American.
Never let famirjarlty exclude respect
|p— Vanburgh. j
Before placing your Life Insuranci
see M. H. Mf*ore at The Bank ot Tu
pelo. He Represents the stronges
company in .the world, and they ar«
writing the'most up-to-date contract*
of all life companies.
I j
it FOR S.lLE -One good saddle horse
bridle amd saddle; one good bugg\
f%orse, runabout and harness. J. J
%_*gers S >n, Tupelo. 28 t,
I / —
FOR/SALE—A high grade' Jersej
Bui', tLro years old. In good condition
* " (Gullet t.
THE SOLAR SYSTEM.
Its Flight Through Spaeo Toward tho
Constellation Lyra.
In wliat direction nre you moving?
If you nre goiug toward the Battery
you will answer “south;" If up Broad
way you will answer “north;” toward
the Hudson you will say “west.” and
if in the direction of the East river
you will reply “east.”
| These answers might he corr
regards the surface of the ‘ •
fiey may he far from answering the
Question for the earth Is turning east
wardly at the rate of about n thousand
miles an hour, which carries you in
that direction very much faster than
yob can move over the ground.
Uijt that rotating motion, constantly
changing your direction la relation to
all outside the earth, is quite subordi
nate xo another far more rapid motion
that is carrying you and the earth
around the suu eastwardly on an en
tirely different curve at the rate of
about blue miles a second, ever chang
ing your direction in relation to the
stars in a circular path 279,000,000
miles lobg.
Yet that Isn’t a key to your direc
tion, for little you, your tiuy earth and
your thtrd rate suu, with all of its
planets, are traveling as a united group
in one direction, differing from all
those mentioned. Fiud the large first
magnitude bluish white star Vega, in
the constellation of Lyra, and you will
he looking in the direction of the flight
that our system is taking through
snare. If you will observe the stars
around! Vega for a few hundred years
you will find that they are apparently
slowly separating, while the stars at
the ppposlte pole of the heavens are
slowly drawing together. That means
we are moving toward Vega and
away from the opposite point. This
motion is In a circle that cannot be
exactly measured, but there is evi
dence to show that it will require
18.500.000 years for our system to
complete it.
Then can you answer, “I am moving
toward Vega.” Perhaps so. but more
likely perhaps not, for it is far from
unlikely that you and your solar sys
tem, with Vega and all of the galaxy
of stars that eye can see on the clear
est night, are moving in the same gen
eral direction around some great com
mon center yet unknown. Who can
tell? No one now, but the possibility
is. presented to the human mind from
what we know of the motions of the
great universal clock of space that
marks off the seconds of eternity.—
Npw York Herald.
A MAN’S GLOVE.
In the Old Days It Served as Proxy
For Its Owner.
SnVhe early days everything was not
regulated for the people as it is uow
by the government and the law courts,
turope was still young then, and peo
ple had rough and ready means of
dealing with one another, of buying
and selling or giving goods and prop
erty and settling disputes. A glove,
as it was very close indeed to a man's
hand, came in course of time to be
looked upon as taking the place of the
hand itself, and sometimes todk the
man's place and was made to represent
him.
For example, to open a fair it was
necessary then to have the consent and
protection of the great lord in whose
country it was going to be held. Those
who wished to open the fair would
come to the nobleman and petition him
to be present. lie might be vary
busy or bored at the idea of having to
go, yet lie would know that it must bo
opened or ills people would lie discon
tented. So he would say to the lead
ers of the people: ‘‘No, my trusty fol
lows, I can't open the fair in person,
hut I will send my glove to do it. You
all know my glove. Nobody lias one
like it in the country. It is the one
my lady mother embroidered for me in
colored silks and silver wire, nnd it
has a deep violet fringe. You can
hang it noove me pmrauce ui
fair grounds as a sign that you arc
acting with my permission. If any one
disputes your right or touches his mas
ter's glove I will attend to him. That’s
all!” So the glove would travel in
state to open the fair.—Westminster
Gazette.

Ready With His Tongue.
James T. Brady, a prominent mem
ber of the New York bar in the last
century, was noted for his ready wit.
Quick as Mr. Brady was with the
readiness of his race for repartee, he
sometimes met his match among his
own countrymen. He was once exam
ining au unwilling witness who per
sistently called him Mr. O'Brady. At
length, even his proverbial good na
ture beiug a little ruffled, he said to
the witness: * “You need not call me
Mr. O'Brady. I've mended my name
since 1 came here and dropped the O.”
“Have ye, now?" retorted the witness.
Ton my sowl. it's a pity ye didn't
mend yer manners at the same time!"
Why Ho Was on Time.
Beranger was one day complimented
by a lady on the punctuality with
which he kept his engagements. “It is
n pleasure,” said she, “to Invite you to
dinner, for you never make us wait.”
“I am no longer young, madam,” re
plied the poet, “and experience has
taught me one thing—it is dnngerons
not to arrive at the precise hour, for
the guests who are waiting for you
will pass the time in discussing your
faults.”
Spoiled the Evening For Her.
“I suppose you had a perfectly love
ly time at the dinner party last night?”
“No. Through some mistake they
seated me next to my husband.”—Chi
cago Record-Herald.
COTTON SEED AND PEAS-We
ryour cotton seed and peas. It
-■*- -ie os before you sell.
_ 27
FOR SALE—Savage 22-cal. Magazine
lammerless Rifle. Just the thing for
cquirrels. Can be seen at the Journal
mce.
FOR RENT:—Two delightful bed
•ooms, convenient to the business sec
ion. Apply at this office.
FOR SALE—One brand new Kimball
Organ at a bargain, if taken at once.
Address I*. 0. Box 495, Tu|
Shoul 1 the Panama Canal
i Be Fortified?
i Aflrnwtiw- Colonel Roosevelt or.J Editor I leant; Negative, General J. Warren
| Kcir.r.
! By THEODORE ROOSEVELT.
yV I E are in honor bound to
fortify it ourselves,
and only by so doing
can we effectively guarantee its
neutrality and, moreover, effec
tively guarantee that it shall not
be used against
us. The chief
material advan
t a g e—certainly
one of the chief
material advan
tages—which we
shall gain by its
construction is
_ the way in which
it will for defensive purposes
DOUBLE THE POWER OF
THE UNITED STATES
NAVY.
I WANT THE GOOD WILL OF
ALL NATIONS, AND I WANT TO
DESERVE IT. BUT IN TIMES OF
CRISIS 1 DONT WANT TO DE
PEND 80LELY UPON IT. WE
BUILT THE CANAL OURSELVES.
WE DON'T HAVE TO ASK ANY
BODY ELSE TO COME IN AND
SAY HOW IT 8HALL BE USED.
By J. WARREN HEIFER., Former Union
General and Speaker of the House.
□HE Uuited States cannot
fortify the Panama canal
without breaking treaty
obligations with Great Britain.
In 1900, when the question
arose of a new treaty between the
United States and Great Britain,
superseding the Clayton-Bulwer
treaty of 1850,
John Hay, the
secretary of
state, and Lord
Pauneefote, act
ing for Great
Britain, drew up
a treaty which
was submitted to the senate for
ratification.
The treaty actually in force is
that of November, 1901, drawn
by Mr. Hay and I-ord Pauneefote.
It expressly forbids the fortifica
tion of the Panama canal in terms
similar to those of the Suez canal
treaty of 1898. IT \\ AS PRE
SENTED FOR RATIFICA
TION TO THE SENATE BY
MR. ROOSEVELT HIMSELF,
who then must have approved its
provisions.
The fact that Mr. Roosevelt ad
vocated the treaty of November,
1901, causes me to wonder at bis
present attitude, but cannot cause
me to alter mine.
By W. R. HEARST.
IN stating that the United
States cannot fortify the
Panama canal General Kei
fer states, first, what is utterly
untrue and, second, what is in
tensely unpatriotic.
The Clayton-Bulwer treaty,
which would have insured the neu
trality of the Panama canal, was
not approved, and the Hay-Paun
eefote treaty, under which the
canal can and will be fortified,
was substituted.
Since that time the acquisition
by the United States of the terri
tory on which the canal is built
DISPELS ALL POSSIBLE
QUESTION OF THE RIGHT
OF THE UNITED STATES TO
FORTIFY and of the declared in
tention of the people of the United
States to fortify
their canal and
to insure the ca
nal’s free use at
all times during
peace or war to
the fleets and
navies of the
United States.
Furthermore, it is the distinct
intention of the people of the
United States to prevent Japan or
Japan’s ally, Great Britain, from
ever using the canal in opposition
to the interests or the wishes of
the people of the United States,
who are clearly the constructors
and proprietors of the canal.
President Taft has done well to
reiterate the Monroe doctrine. He
has done better to declare the gov
ernment’s intention to fortify the
Panama canal.
In view of the aggressive and
interfering attitude of the allied
nations of Great Britain and
Japan, Mr. Roosevelt as well ,as
Mr. Taft deserves the commenda
tion of all patriotic citizens f>f his
efforts in behalf of a forti/ed ca
nal. MR. ROOSEVELT WAS
AS ENTIRELY RIGHT IN HIS
PANAMA CANAL SPEECH
as he was entirely wrong in his
London guildhall speech.
Tt is to be hoped that all citi
zens, even the most devoted Dem
ocrats, will commend and support
the inspiring attitude of these
leading Republican statesmen,
since the nation’s interest and the
nation’s honor must rise superior
to all personal feeling or party
prejudice.
Tax American Heiresses
Who Marry Foreign Titles.
By Princess FEODOSSIEFF CANT ACUZENE. Who Is One of Them.
HS an American I protest against national robbery. A tax
should be placed on the exported fortune of every de
parting American heiress who contracts an international
marriage.
I BELIEVE THAT AMERICA SHOULD ENJOY WHAT
AMERICA PRODUCES. The Vanderbilts, the Goulds, the Astors,
the Goelets and the Drexels and all the rest of the well known fam
ilies who have sent their daughters abroad wrapped in a “golden
fleece” gathered their wealth right here in America. Most of these
families GREW RICH THROUGH SOME GREAT NATURAL
DEVELOPMENT. They haven’t even the excuse that their money
came to them in trade with foreign markets, for our richest men
are not primarily merchants. Their oil or their gold or their rail
roads are the fruit of American labor, and the profits of these things
COME OUT OF AMERICAN POCKETS.
I think that eveiy heiress who marries abroad should be taxed a
definite per cent of the money she uses up abroad. She should be
compelled to file affidavits of the amount she takes over in the first
place and after that of her annual income. I see no reason why the
tax should not continue throughout her life on whatever money is
earned here in America and rightfully belongs in circulation here.
And the percentage should not be too small. Remember, those whom
it would affect could easily afford it.
QUITE ASIDE FROM THE MONEY CONSIDERATION, THE TAX
WOULD HAVE A SPLENDID EFFECT ON THE PEOPLE WHOM IT
TOUCHED. IT WOULD GIVE THEM THE WARM GLOW OF FEEL
ING THAT THEY COULD DO SOME DEFINITE, TANGIBLE THING
FOR THEIR OWN COUNTRY ACROSS THE WATER.
They would be better citizens of the new country for not for
getting the old. And then no European could over again aay, “The
American only gets rich in hia own land and then leaves it for
another.” ^ ^
SWITCH TIES WANTED
We are offering new and high prices for switch
ties delivered at stations along the Frisco Railroad.
The work will last from the present date until June
30, 1911. If Interested write for particulars to i s at
814 Brown-Marx Building, Birmingham, Ala.
Kite Foster-Blodgett Tie and Timber Company
..-----.T—
VAN C. CAVETT’S
B1G SALE
of his entire new stock |
Dry Goods, Clothing, Shoes, j
Hats, Etc., Etc. j
is drawing big crowds to his store every day. g
This stock is brand new and is being sold at 1
prices advertised in his circular. Do not miss 1
these great bargains .\ I
I Remember the Place |
I 210 Main Street | «
--- - - -
• *
v.*
# -—
* i
21 «
DEPARTMENT
All Kinds of Commercial Work Exe
cuted in the Latest style on First-class
Stock at City Prices. Don’t Send Off,
I But Get Our Prices on Anything You
1 Need in the Printing Line v V
Tupelo Journal

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