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Stone County enterprise. [volume] (Wiggins, Stone County, Mississippi) 1916-current, December 13, 1923, Image 12

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87065666/1923-12-13/ed-1/seq-12/

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1 MURPHREE MAKES
1 TAX-BURDEN RE
I LIEF SUGGESTION
^ 'Jackson, Miss., Nov. 27.—Every
1-thing printed about the financial
^condition of Mississippi and
c, especially ways and means to
| lighten to burdens of the tax
payers seems to be read with in
| creasing interest as the time ap
proaches for the taking of office
by the governor-elect, the other
& Dennis Murphree, or “The Man
from Calhoun,” as he is universal
ly called, is a vigilant and
patriotic observer of the trend of
the time and is deeply interested
in bringing relief to the' tax
H burdened people of his native
- state. In a communication just
received from Mr. Murphree, he
makes some interesting and
valuable sugestions.
“I have read with keen interest
the discussion under the heading
of “Mississippi Comment” in a
• recent issue of the Comercial Ap
peal on the income tax laws of
f our state.
“1 was especially interested
because of the present situation
in Mississippi, so far as the state’s
finances are concerned, a.id be
cause of the grave problems in
the matter of taxation that will
confront the Legislature which
will convene January 8.
* “There is no doubt but that the
feeling existing in the minds of
the people of Mississippi is that
there must be some check on the
tendency towards increased
government al expenses. Nor is I
there any doubt as to how the j
folks would regard an increase
in the advalorem taxes of the
state. *
p “The problem of revenue with
which to meet the appropriations
for the state has always been of
interest to me. I have had some
little experience in the matter of
endeavoring to secure the pas
sage of measures in the legislative
- bodies of Mississippi for the past
12 years, having served on the
various capacities, and I realize
from experience of the past what
will confront the Legislature of
1924.
t “With the establishment of
various new institutions for the
state during the past several
years and the widening and
broadening of the duties of those
already existing, the expenses of
the state’s government have in
creased by leaps and bounds.
“It seems to me that we have
almost reached th elimit of our
tax paying ability so far as the
| flat advalorem taxes are con
j cerned. If this is true then the
I next thing for consideration is,
‘Are there any other avenues for
increased finaces open?’
“It seems to me there are two
a venues for f inanies for the state
that may be investigated with the
probability o fprofit.
“One is our inheritance tax
laws. Our present statutes on in
heritance impose a tax of one
half of one per cent on all estates
which net above $5,000, and ad
ditional tax on the heirs of the
estate graded according to the
amount received. This tax brings
into the state treasury an
average of about $75,000 a year.
“The United States govern
ment places a flat tax on the
estate only and does not tax any
estate v hich is smaler than $50,
000 net. Yet the United States
government gets practically a
half million dollars a year out of
Mississippi from inheritance
taxes.
“My idea would be to raise the
not estate to at least $25,000 and
levy a larger tax. hTe tax on the
right to receive should be abolish
ed.
“Properly drawn and applied
this change will net the state of,
Mississippi an additional half mil-1
lion dollars a year revenue. i
“The income tax is the other
that might be amended so as to
bring in revenue to help out Mis
sissippi.
“I do not lay claim to enough
ability to draw the bill that I
have in mind, but this is an idea
to which I have given consider
able thought.
“Our taxes at present lie
heaviest on those who own the
land and till the soil. My opinion
is that the farmer pays the
heaviest tax burden and reaps the
smaller proportion of reward
from the things upon which he
pays the tax than any other
individual or class in our state.
“For example, a farmer who
OAvns 80 acres of poor land and
gets from that land an income of
possibly $800 a year pays a heavy
advalorem tax on that land frojn
Avhieh he gets his income. Yet
••here hie utold thousands of in
dividuals in our state Avho draAV
salaries and Avages from different
; corporations and industries and
; Avho—if their in 'ome is less than
$2,500 a year—pay not a nickel
| toAvards the support of the state
! save a poll tax
“If we could so draAV a bill
that would take $10 or $15 a year
as an income tax from each indi
vidual in Mississippi who makes
as much as $800 a year and Avho
pays no advalorem tax upon that
thing fropi Avhieh he draAVS his
livelihood, just think Avhat an
enormous amount of revenue we
could collect and yet collect from
a source, and from those folks
who are not uoav helping to bear
except indirectly any of the
burdens of the state.
“I knoAV personally a number
of folks in our state A\dio oAvn no
property AvhateATer except an
automobile and yet Avho draAV
fairly good salaries or Avages,
drive up a'nd dovm the graveled
roads that the lands are taxed to
build and support, vote for all
bond issues for public improve
ments an pay no taxes at all ex
cept poll taxes and one cent a
gallon on gasoline.
“This idea boiled doAATn is
simply that Ave seek to tax those
folks Avith an incopie tax Avho are
paying no tax on the things from
Avhieh theyderive their income
and to credit those folks Avith
Avhatever tax they may pay on
real estate or other property sub
ject to advalorem taxes.
ir
“I do noh^Aiow whether or not
it is feasible, workable or even
constitutional, but it appeals to
me, in our present dilemma, as at
least worthy of consideration. If
it can be applied it will bring in
a wonderful amount of additional
revenue.
“Practically every candidate
for office in Mississippi last sum
mer made economy in state’s af
fairs, opposition to the issuance
of bondsof the state for current
expenses and appropriations
within the bonds of the revenues
of the state and to carefully,
scrutinize all appropriation leaks. |
Personally it is my sincere desire,
to see these pledges carried out. j
I believe this desire is shared
by tohse others who have been
honored by the suffrage of the
voters of the state. By the
elimination of factional bicker
ings, steady application to the
task and co-operative team work,
the load can and must be lighten
ed.”
NEWSPAPER POSTAGE
Much pleasure is expressed in
administrative circles ever the
fact that the postoffice depart
ment has readier the point of j
beoing self-supporting. This \
achievement is not due so much
to the management of the depart |
.mont as textile fact that ihe petal
raes on newspapers am* ^eriodi- j
cals stand as fixed under the war
revenue laws of 1917, while prac
tically withput exception war
taxes have been removed from all
other industries. It is highly j
discriminatory to require news-'
papers to pay the present exor-j
bitant postal rates fixed as a war
measure, and especially since1
practieaily every other enterprise
lias been relieved of the exor
bitant inerases.
- I
H 9 H
H ■
i ^ 3
I Fancy Groceries I
When Yen Shop For Eats I
l j Bear fa Mind—S anitary 9
Conditions, Quality, Ser- I
vice, Price. ... 9
h
'i Yen Get It Ail At 9
H
JL • L I
Wiggins, Miss. 9
f
I IGGINS DRY GO " ’ ..I 'AN I
I FROM THE BIG CHRISTMAS STORE A I
I GIFT FOR EVERY NE I
WHEN YOU GO SHOPPING FOR HIM OR HER—YOU TRY TO SELECT SOMETHING THAT WILL GIVE THE GREATEST PLEASURE NO MATTER WTTO tttrv 8
SN MAY BE—MOTHER—WIFE—DAUGHTER—SWEETHEART—OR FRIED—YOU WILL FIND THE PLEASING GIFT HERE MAYBE THE SUGGPSTTrVM? rrt nw ll
^ - WILL HELP YOU—MERCHANDISE HIGH IN QUALI TY AND REASONABLE IN PRICE xix, ueeuw m
I
GIFTS FOR CHILDREN
Dolls
Drums
Doll Buggies
Rubber Balls
Mechanical Toys
Express AYagons
Toy Trains
Tricycles
Rattlers
Watches
Bracelets
Christmas Stocking's
Handkerchief Box
Tea-Sets
Story Books
Stationery
Baby Crib Blankets
Shoes
Silk Socks
Wool Sacqnes
Wool and Silk Bootees
Baby Wraps
GIFTS FOR GIRLS
Wool Choppie Coats
House Slippers
Silk Hosery
Purses
Blouses
Gloves
Silk Ujnbrellas
Manm Dolls
Wool Sweatex’s
GIFTS FOR MEN
Silk Ties
Silk Socks
Sweater Coats
Handkerchiefs with initials
Shoes
Silk Shirts
J
Wool Shirts
Hats
Caps
Leather Leggins
Wool Pants
Underwear
Leather Belts
Men’s Suits
Rain Coats
Over Coats
Supporters
Collars
Gloves
Men’s House Shoes
Men’s Dress Shoes
Men’s Boots
GIFTS FOR LADIES
Kid Gloves
Silk Hose
Wool Choppie Coats
Felt House Slippers
Beads
Shoes
Silk Sun and Rain Umbrellas i
Hand Painted Vases
Statues
Water Sets
Lemonade Sets
Blankets
Fur Collar Coats
Waists
Wool Sweaters
Ladies’ Hats
Towel Sets

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