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The Sierra citizen. (Downieville, Sierra County, Calif.) 185?-1???, March 19, 1859, Image 1

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THE SIERRA CITIZEN.
PUBLISHED AT 00WNIEY1LLE EVERY SATURDAY MORNING,
—IT—
Homer King, T. L. Ham 4c Wash. Wright,
WASH. WEIGHT, EDITOR.
OFFICE ON THE COURT HOUSE SQUARE, DOWNIEVILLE.
TERMS—
Subscription—One year, to city subscribers, in advance.. .$6 00
One year, by mat* w Express, in advance... 500
Six months 8 00
Single copies 25
MATES OF AD VBBTIBING
Half Square of five lines, first insertion 2 00
do do more than one insertion, each 1 00
One Square, first Insertion 8 00
do more than one insertion, each 150
Special Notices—Twenty-five per cent, advance on above rates.
BOOKS, CARDS, HAND-BILLS, LEGAL BLANKS, and other de
scriptions of Job Printing executed with despatch, and on terms ac
cording with the times.
AO BETS TOR TUB CITIZEN;
THOMAS BOYCE.Cor. Washington A Montgom’ry sts .Bab Frahcisco.
A. RANDAL A C 0.... ..O street, (near Post Office). Marysville.
A. C. CHAPMAN Camptonvillb.
O. F. ACKERLEY Cox’s Bar.
H. 8. BECK Eureka Citv.
O. 8. BURNHAM Craig’s Flat ft Morristown.
W. R. RILEY Chips’ Flat.
W. U. ROYAL Brandt City.
Authorised Agents.—Mr. H. Hoffman, of Moore’s Flat, and Dr.
Alban, of Orleans Plat, Nevada county, are authorized to transact
business, in their respective localities, for the Sierra Citizen-
BUSINESS CARDS.
WOT. OT. STEWART,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
DOWNIEVILLE. 4-tf
Francis J. Dunn John Caldwell.
DUNN A CALDWELL,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW,
WILL PRACTICE In all the Courts of the 14th Judicial District,
and the Supreme Court of the State of California. Residence,
Nevada City.
Dec. 14th, 1858. 46-tf
SI. F. BROWN,
Attorney at Law.
CHIPS’ FLAT, SIERRA COUNTY. 2Gtf
j. r. McConnell will. Campbell.
McCONNEL <fe CAMPBELL,
Attorneys at Law,
HAVE formed a connection in the practice of the Law in the
District Court, Sierra County, and in cases appealed from the
County of Sierra to the Supreme Court.
Mr. McConnell will assist Mr. Campbell in all cases in the District
Court when his assistance may be required.
OFFICE —On Bridge Street, at the North End of Dcrgan Bridge,
DOWNIEVILLE. 12-tf
HARRY I. THORNTON, JR.,
Attorney and Counselor at Law.
Office on Bridge Street, at the End or Duroan Bridge.
DOWNIEVILLE, CAL. BSm
0. C. HALL,
Attorney a t Xj aw ,
l-2m DOWNIEVILLE.
M. KIRKPATRICK,
Attorney ami Counselor at Law,
Office in Downey’s New Bcilding, Dcrgan Flat,
l-4ra DOWNIEVILLE.
H. B. COSSITT,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
Will attend to all business entrusted to him in the Fourteenth Judicial
District.
Office—Main Street, Downievillk. 010-l-9m
ALANSON SMITH,
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELOR AT LAW ,
YKT ILL practice in the 14th Judicial District Court, and the Supreme
v v Court of the State.
Office of County and Probate Judge. 1-tf
J. R. PLUNKETT,
Attorney and Counselor at Law,
DOWNIEVILLE. 22tf
0. S. BURNHAM,
Notary Public,
CRAIG’S FLAT AND MORRISON’S DIGGINGS.
OFFICE, AT LANGTON’S PIONEER EXPRESS OFFICES.
Feb. 6,1858. |. t f
OT. A. KELLY, OT. D.,
Physician and Surgeon,
BRANDY CITY.
REFERENCES Drg. Lbfbvbe and Watman, and I. L. Godfrey,
Forest City; John C. Fall and W. T. Ellis, Marysville; and 8.
Taylor, Brandy City, 46-6 m
J. H. WAYOTAN,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON,
FOREST CITY. 29-tf
I. E. JAMES
County Surveyor,
Residence —Downievilie. Office in the Court House, Durgan
Flat. 1-Sm
I. G. JONES,
Laad Surveyor and Civil Engineer,
DOWNIEVILLE.
10T Ditches graded. Mining Claims surveyed, Maps, Plans and
Drawings, neatly executed. l-tf
GEORGE WEBBER,
CONTRACTOR , CARPENTER, BUILDER, and
LUMBER DEALER,
ON DCRGAN FLAT, DOWNIEVILLE.
tr The best quality of LUMBER constantly on hand and for
■ale. 50-tf
W, MERRITT A. BADLAM.
MERRITT & BADLAOT,
EEAL ESTATE BROKEKS,
GENERAL AGENCY AND
NEWSPAPER OFFICE,
No* 105, J. Street, Sacramento. 4t-tf
Randal & Co.,
NEWSPAPER ADVERTISING AGENCY,
B Street, near the Past-Office, OTarysville.
AGENTS for the San Francisco and Sacramento Daily, Weekly
and Steamer Newspapers. Also,
AGENTS FOR THE “SIERRA CITIZEN,”
AND OTHER CALIFORNIA NEWSPAPERS.
*JF All orders promptly attended to.
Advertising Agency,
N* B. Corner Moiitgonierjr and Washington Sts.,
SAN FRANCISCO.
APV BBTIfIRM WTB and subscriptions received for the following
Papers:
THE SIERRA CITIZEN, Downievilie;
Republican, Shasta ; Tribune, San Jose; Union Democrat, Sonora;
Placer Herald, Auburn; Butte Record, Oroviile;
San Andreas Independent; Amador Sentinel. Jackson;
Mountain Messenger, La Porte ; Mariposa Democrat;
Pacific Sentinel, Santa Cras; Siskiyou Chronicle, Yreka ;
Plumas Argus, Quincy; Alameda County Gasette;
Solano County Herald, Benicia; Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, 0. T.;
Democratic Standard, Portland, O.T; Oregon Argus,Oregon City,o.T.;
Occidental Messenger, Corvallis, 0. T ; Placer Press, Auborn;
Weekly Times, Portland, O. T.; Tuolumne Courier, Columbia.
Having perfected arrangements for advertising in the principal pa
cers iu tne Atlantic cities, i am enabled to insert advertisement* at
yi€ lowest x&toie
2-bf THOMAS BOYCE, San Francisco.
DOWNIEVILLE, SIERRA COUNTY, CALIFORNIA, SATURDAY, MARCH 19,1859.
MARYSVILLE ADVERTISEMENTS.

C. L. LOW F. F. LOW.
LOW, BROTHERS Sc CO.,
BANKERS,
Corner of Plaza and High Streets,
MARYSVILLE.
GOLD DUST
PURCHASED AT THE HIGHEST MARKET RATES.
ADVANCES
Made on Gold Dost to assay, or forwarded to the Mint for coinage.
Checks at Par
ON PARROTT Sc CO., SAN FRANCISCO.
OUR SIGHT EXCHANGES
FOR SALE OX
HOWLAND Sc ASPINWALL, NEW YORK.
Also on all the other principal Eastern Cities.
py Purchase Gity, County, or State Securities, Certificates of
Deposit, and other Exchange, at current rates, and transact a
GENERAL BASKING BUSINESS.
Marysville, February 10,1858. 2-tf
AGENCY OF THE
Almaden Quicksilver Mines.
THE undersigned, having been appointed Agents for the sale of
the above celebrated Quicksilver, are prepared to furnish it at
the established rates of the Agents in San Francisco.
2 tf LOW, BROS. A CO., Marysville.
Eagle Hat Manufactory.
D STREET, MARYSVILLE.
THE largest assortment of HATS and CAPS in the State is to HTI
be found at the EAGLE HAT MANUFACTORY, D Street,
between First and Second, Marysville.
MOLESKIN, OTTER, BEAVER, PERUVIAN and FELT HATS, of
the FINEST QUALITY.
LADIES’ RIDING HATS and CHILDREN’S HATS and CAPS, of
ALL THE NEW STYLES.
fg* Hats and Caps, of all kinds, made to order.
All descriptions of Hats cleaned in the most approved manner.
All orders from customers abroad promptly attended to.
New Goods received by every Steamer.
May 2S,ISST. JAMES L. DALEY,
1 D Street, Marysville.
ITlerchaiit’s Hotel,
MARYSVILLE.
fI'tlHS OLD ESTABLISHED HOUSE, in order to meet the demand
A. upon its increasing business, lias been enlarged by the addition
of a number of
New and Elegant Family Rooms,
A new Promenade Gallery of two hundred feet in length, and has
been otherwise renovated and improved, making it one of the larg
est and most commodious, as it has always been the most quiet and
orderly Hotel in the country.
The Proprietor, in returning thanks to the Merchants, Business
Men and Citizens of Marysville, and to a large portion of the Trav
eling Public, for their eenerous patronage, assures them that no
pains nor expense will be spared to make this permanently, and all
that constitutes a FIRST-CLASS HOUSE, the best in the city.
THE MERCHANTS’ HOTEL employs no runners. It is located on
First Street, Near the New Bridge,
On the Yuba river, where the Proprietor, always on band, will at
tend personally to the wants of his customers, and hopes and ex
pects the same liberal patronage the House has always received from
a discriminating public.
Office and Dining Room up stairs. Bar and Billiard Saloon be
low. House open at all hours, day and night.
22-3 m SOLON PECK. Proprietor. '
LEGAL ADVERTISEMENTS.
DISTRICT COURT SUMMONS^
DISTRICT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT, IN
AND FOR SIERRA COUNTY.
STATE OF CALIFORNIA, (
County of Sierra, pS
THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA, Plaintiff vs. BENJ. GREEN kt.al.,
Defendants.
Action brought in the District Court of the 14th Judicial District,
and the Complaint filed In the County of Sierra, in the Office of
the Clerk of the said District Court.
The people of the state of California to benj.
GREEN, B. M. FETTER, CHRIS. REIS, E. J. SMITH, G. B.
WRIGHT, T. R. KIBBE, 11. 11. PURDY, JNO. EAGER, R. AN
DREWS, R. P. MOORE SAM’LD. HILL, Q. A. CLEMENTS, B. M.
ANDERSON, S. M. PARSONS, V. WEAVER, and T. H. FLETCHER,
Send Greeting. —You are hereby required to appear in an action
brought against you by the above named Plaintiff in the District
Court of the 14th Judicial District, in and for the County of Siena,
and to answer the Complaint filed therein, (a copy of which accom
panies this Summons,) within ten days, (exclusive of the day of ser
vice,) after the service on you of this Summons—if served within
this County ; if served out of this County, but within this Jndicial
District, within twenty days; or if served out of said District, then
within forty days—or judgment by defau't will be taken against you.
The said action is brought to recover the sum of $3,75u 24 upon an
official Bond, with damages, and legal interest thereon from the sth
day of May, A. D. ISSB, and costs —more fully set out in Plaintiff’s
Complaint; and if you fail to appear and answer the said Com
plaint as above required, the Plaintiff will take judgment for said
sum of $3,75024 and interest and cost.
Given under my hand and the Seal of the District Court
I, o lof the 14th Judicial District, this 27th day of December,
) ) A. ». 1853. RALPH ELLIS, Clerk.
—r— By Geo. E. Tallmadge, Deputy Clerk.
STATE OF CALIFORNIA,!
County of Sierra. ) kS ‘
It appearing to my satisfaction, by the affidavit of Harry I. Thorn
ton Jr., District Attorney In and for Sierra County, that a cause of
action exists against the above named Defendants, arising on the
official bond of the said Benj. Green, and that the said Defendants,
E.J. SMITH, G. B. WRIGHT, B. M. ANDERSON and S. M. PAR
SONS have departed from this State of California, and reside with
out this said State, and somewhere unknown in the British Posses
sions of North America, and that they are proper parties to this
action, 1 do order that the Summons in this action, of which a copy
accompanies this Order, be served on such Defendants by the publi
cation thereof, once in each week for three months, In the newspa
per printed in the County of Sierra, called the Sierra Citizen , the
same being most likely to give notice to the persons to be served.
ALANSON SMITH, County Judge of Sierra County.
Dated, Downieville, Dec. 27th, 1858, at Chambers.
STATE OF CALIFORNIA, 1
County of Sierra. ( bs ‘
I, RALPH ELUS, Clerk of the 14th District Court for Sierra
County,hereby certify that the above and foregoing is a full, true
and correct copy of an Order of the Hon. Alanson Smith, County
Judge of Sierra County, as the same appears on file in my Office.
In testimony whereof, 1 hereunto set my hand as Clerk,
I , o (and the Seal of the 14th District Court, this 29th day of De
( - ( cember, A. D. 1358. RALPH ELLIS, Clerk D. C.
—4S-Sm By Geo. E. Tallmadge, Deputy Clerk.
DISTRICT COURT SUMMONS.
DISTRICT COURT, FOURTEENTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT, IN AND
FOR THE COUNTY OP SIERRA.
STATE OP CALIFORNIA, I
County of Sierra, j 5
A. C. CORBETT, Plaintiff, vs. A. CURRY and Q. A. CLEMENTS,
Defendants.
Action brought in the District Court, 14th Judicial District, and the
Complaint filed in the County of Sierra, in the Office of the Clerk
of the said District Court.
THE People of the State of California to A. CURRY and Q. A.
CLEMENTS, Send Greeting : —You are hereby required to
appear in an action brought against you by the above named Plain
tiff, in the District Court of the 14th Judicial District, in and for the
County of Sierra, and to answer the Complaint filed therein, (a copy
of which accompanies this Summons) within ten days, (exclusive of
the day of service) after the service on you o f this Summons—if served
within this County ; if served out of th is County, but within this Judi
cial District, within twenty days; or if served out of said District.then
within forty days—or judgment by default will be taken against you.
The said action is brought to obtain a decree of this Conn for the
Foreclosure of a certain Mortgage described in the Complaint, and
executed by the said A. Curry, on property known as the Buckeye
Stable, in Downieville, County and State aforsaid, on the Sth day of
June, A. D. 1868, to secure the payment of a certain Promissory
Note, for the sum of six hundred dollars with interest at four per cent,
per month fromdate, and dated June Sth,lBsB, that the premises con
veyed thereby may be sold, and the proceeds applied to the payment
of said Promissory Note and interest and cost, and in case such pro
ceeds are not sufficient to pay the same, then to obtain an execution
against said A. Curry, for the balance remaining due; and also
that said Defendant and said Q. A. Clements, who has some lien on
said property, and all persons claiming by, through or under them,
may be barred and foreclosed of all right title and interest in and to
said mortgaged premises, and for other and further relief; and if
yon fail to appear and answer the Complaint as above required, the
Plaintiff will apply to the Court for the relief therein demanded.
Given under my hand and Seal of the said District Court
St a ( of the 14th Judicial District, this 13th day of December,
1 *• fA. D. 1858. RALPH ELLIS, Clerk of District Court.
—. — By Geo. K. Tallmadge, Deputy Clerk.
By Order of the County Judge.
H. I. Thornton Jr., Attorney for Plaintiff. 46-3m*
Dissolution of Copartnership.
THE COPARTNERSHIP heretofore existing between P. VAN
CLIEF and WM. M, STEWART, under the firm name of
VANCLIEF t STEWART, has been dissolved. The reason of the
dissolution was the appointment of Mr. Vanclikf to the office of
District Judge.
Wm. M. Stewart will continue in the practice, and settle the un
finished business of the late firm. P. VANCLIEF.
WM, M.STEWAEX.
Downieville, Feb. 24 th, 1359.
1b Justification of the National Administration.
We have frequently said that the magistracy of James
Buchanan would rise too high in the opinion of national
citizens for the small arrows of calumny and the great
rockets of faction to reach. We have not said this on
account of admiration for the President as an individual
or a statesman, not because his career or abilities are
brilliant and profound, not for any reason except that
events have naturally developed the snccessfulness of
the Administration. However superficial this view may
appear, it is, nevertheless, one combining reason and
fact, which, though never so simple, are the best parts
of argument and fact. We could not, perhaps, define
the cause of our belief in the certainty which would
bring to the Administration a national vindication of all
its acts; but we were convinced of the fact, as well from
the recklessness of opposition as confidence in the men
composing the head of the Government, and their fore
shadowed policy. No general system of denunciation
like that which sectional, factional and personal animos
ity instituted after the election of Buchanan, could, with
all its prolonged intensity, and astonishing diversity of
shape, injure an Administration sustained by the pre
determined purpose of acting for the national good.—
Opposition, to have been effective in its purpose, was too
eager and boisterous, embracing at first all the elements
of agitation and exhausting the whole before the Presi
dential term had half expired. A re-organization of the
disturbing qualities and a repetition of the abuse, cannot
fall with weight or precision upon the object assailed,
but will be annihilated by the feebleness of the assailant-
We do not ask the people to be enthusiastic in praise
of the President or bis official associates ; we never par
take of that feeling toward public men ; and it is our
theory that man-idols in a republic symbolize the prom
ise of monarchy, and that wild favoritism guarantees
early danger to the liberties of the people. We would
reduce our political party system to a level of severe
tests and unexcitable observance, never allowing detrac
tion to center upon tendencies which, in their nature and
adaptation, seem favorable to the collective welfare.—
Those who conduct public affairs honorably, and con
formably to constitutional principles, should receive
none of the over-praise of sycophancy but all of the
candid approval of well-balanced and patriotic manli
ness. This is why we say that the present National Ad
ministration is capable of out ruling the mad heresies
which have beset it, and is sufficient to awaken the bet
ter sense of unprejudiced and Union-loving citizens in
all the liberal communities of the nation.
It has been one main endeavor of falsifying parties,
to represent the Democratic party of Pennsylvania as
utterly wanting in approval of the Buchanan Presidency.
We append an article from the Pennsylvanian, one of
the oldest and most reliable journals :
“The opposition papers of this State are endeavoring
to produce an impression that the Democracy of Penn
sylvania are divided with reference to the measures of
the National Administration. This is an old trick of the
enemy, intended to injure the national character of the
Democracy of the Keystone State, by placing them upon
a platform different from that occupied by the party in
other sections of the Union. But the action of the party
in all portions of the Commonwealth, contradicts in the
most marked and emphatic manner, this allegation of
the opposition journals. Not a county meeting has yet
been held which has not spoken plainly and favorably
upon the question of indorsing the administration of
James Buchanan. Indeed, there seems to be a singular
unanimity in the party in this State with reference to
the great measures which illustrate the Presidential term
of the present Chief Magistrate. The foreign policy of
Mr. Buchanan has extorted commendation even from his
political enemies, while his management of the difficult
and irritating questions of domestic policy upon which
he has been called to act, has shown a deep and sincere
regard for the constitution and laws of the land, and a
patriotic determination to preserve the guarantied rights
of the several States from the attacks of that party
which is determined to reach the gor.l of their ambition,
even if their path lies over th%ruins of a mutilated con
stitution and a dissevered Union, Upon this record, the
administration of James Buchanan rests, and hence the
party in Pennsylvania are rallying to its support with a
sure conviction that, by so doing, they are placing them
selves upon a sound, national basis, which will command
the respect and receive the support of their brethren of
all parts of the nation.”
The Question Unwohtht of Discussion. —The sale of
the mineral lands of this State, has become a question
upon which parties who have schemes hidden, are desi
rous of creating discussion. Considerable expression has
been given to the question, principally in the shape of
communications to a Sacramento newspaper, and though
the affirmative and negative are presented, and though
one side pretends to be “ a voice from the mines,” we are
convinced that the subject was introduced by the parties
who have caused remarks for and against to appear. The
articles which seem to have emanated in the mining dis
tricts, are composed in the cities by speculators or their
agents; the effect sought is a general inquiry that it
may be seen whether an endeavor to legislate will have
the practicability of a political move. If it should be
apparent that the people would take the question as one
deserving of great attention, then those trafficking
knaves who flourish on matters which concern the public,
may urge agitation and contrive to make it one of their
numerous sources of profit in private money and public
office.
Not believing that the miner can feel more interest in
any question relative to the mineral lands than so far as
his immediate and temporary possession extends, we can
see no actual cause for controversy on what might or
should be done with the mineral portion of the public
domain. Of that domain, the miner wants and expects
nothing except the privilege of owning the gold which
be digs out of it. As these lands are at present situa
ted, they are, to all the purposes be thinks of, his ; his
right is undisputed, and though upon first principles,
proprietorship is in the government, the soil and its con
tents are deeded to him ; his first privilege and best bus
iness direct him to steady employment for his own bene
fit. The argument that the miner would become more
prosperous and contented, were mining claims made real
property, represents a disguised means of rendering the
claims taxable property. If this were not the fact, there
would be nothing in the notion of increased permanence
and prosperity. If the miner in an undisturbed condi
tion on the mineral lands, possessing all the necessary
protection from law and custom, is unsettled and discon
tented, no mere act of government to make him a real
proprietor will establish and enrich him.
We believe it to be the right and duty of the miner to
uphold non-interference with the gold lands, by disap
proving every effort to discuss the question of their dis
posal or the application of new systems of regulation.
TBAVELBBs’GunME.—Oar friend H. J- Bidleman, book
seller and news agent, 56 Fourth street Sacramento, has
placed in our possession “ Taylor's new map and trav
eler’s guide.” This work is cheap and convenient, con
tains much information and may be obtained, at whole
sale or retail, of Bidleman, to whom we recommend
country purchasers of books and stationery.
j Hittell and Natural Appearances. —John S. Bittell
appears in the March number of the California Maga- m
zinc with an article on the topography of California, and
in answer to questions raised by the Sierra Citizen, rel
ative to statements made by him in a former article on
the same subject We have been pleased with Mr. Hit
tell’s peculiarly California productions, and hope to
derive additional gratification from the perusal of his
future contributions. In replying to our inquiries, he
evidently experienced less difficulty than would meet us
in satisfying the demands made in the following para
graphs, which are his:
“ Now, Mr. Editor of the Sierra Citizen, having re
plied as well as I could to the questions propounded to
me, permit me to propound some to you. What are the
elevations, positions and names of the chief mountain
peaks and ridges in your county ? Are any of them
covered with snow throughout the year ? If so, which
are they? What are the respective elevations of the
snow lines on the sunny and shady slopes? What por
tion of the county is covered with snow from Novem
ber to July? How deep does the snow fall, and how
long does it lie, and how thick is the ice at Downieville
in ordinary and extraordinary winters? How much of
the surface of the county is covered with brush, how
much with timber, and how much is barren rock?
Of course, reasonable men will not expect precise and
perfectly accurate information on these points, but an
interesting and valuable approximate estimate can be
made on all of them by any intelligent man who has
been long in the county, and seen or heard mnch of the
character of the country. Perhaps such information as
I have sought for, ought to be given by the county sur
veyors in their annual reports, but as they are not, I
apply to you as the next best authority. There are per
sons who carefully collect and preserve articles on the
resources and conformation of our State, and if you
should give any or all the information for which I bare
asked, it will not be thrown away or forgotten.”
Mr. Hittell will recollect that we have not stipulated
to supply his “ Topography of California ” with basis or
assistant facts, though if we were .possessed of such in
that reliable shape which could render them unquestion
ably valuable, it would be our pleasure to impart. If
we interrogate in reference to the conformation of Cali
fornia, it should not follow that we are familiar with the
conformation of Sierra county, or that there is an indi
vidual, no matter how long he may have inhabited this
portion of the State, who can say he definitely under
stands the peculiarities of the natural conformation about
him. We presumed that Mr. Hittell had begun the
study of natural appearances in California, and was pre
pared with data on hand to elaborate and instruct.
The people here are singularly self-confident in form
ing estimates, and if we should ask any three of them
what the bight of Galloway hill is, the first would an
swer, “nine thousand feet, Fm told ; ” the second, “they
say it’s about four thousand feet, I believe; ” and the
third, “ don’t know—may be it’s four miles high—it’s a
mighty long hill, I can tell that.” At the base of Gal
loway hill reposes the important village of Downieville.
We have named it “ the hole in the hills ; ” in the sum
mer season, it is as cool as a potato hole, and in the
rainy aijd winter seasons, the temperature is like that of
a basin of lukewarm water. Severe winter approaches
to within a few hundred yards, but never reaches us;
snow falls to the depth of ten, fifteen and perhaps twen
ty feet, on the bights just above us, but not much over
two feet is ever measured out to the town at one time,
and that will not withstand the warmth of one pleasant
day.
We had intended to interfere with some of Mr. Hittell’s
remarks on “ the region of perpetual snow,” and the
snow-line formed by the Sierra Nevada range, and which
we are of the opinion, is perceptible throughout the
year ; but the noted mountaineer of the Trinity Journal
has dissolved all of our argumentative snow with the
statement that, while ranging over the highest summits in
the month of October, he found the mountains in a blaze,
became red-hot himself, and would have been burned to
death had be not melted and run down!
“ I Ain’t Sick ; I’m Getting Converted.” —An Ameri
canized Italian attended church in the time of a “ revi
val,” and was surprised at the exhibitions of sudden
repentance. He was ignorant of the meaning of the
demonstrations made by stricken sinners, and when the
person who sat next to him fell groaning to the floor, the
astonished man tenderly endeavored to raise the pros
trate one, inquiring as he did so, “Mi freen, bees you
seek 9 .” “Oh! no,” murmured the mourner, “ 1 ain’t
sick, I’m getting converted-ah-oo! ”
We have seen an announcement of the illness of a
respected cotemporary. If he be ill, we sincerely hope
for his early recovery, but if situated as we suspect it is
possible for him to be, we can feel but slightly sorry.—
He is the most enthusiastic of popular sovereigntyites,
and bates the concomitant and inseparable isms; but
many of his aids are Brodericks and Republicans who
hold the balance of power over him, insisting that his
paper shall furnish expression and hope to each of the
isms whose business in election times, is to form a combi
nation against the Democratic party. A municipal
election came on and the popular sovereigntyite was
suffered to steer the paper craft half through the storm,
wheu his illness was announced and a Republican took
the helm. The sick man should get well of bis averse
political proclivities by getting into the healthful atmos
phere of National Democracy. We trust that his case
may not be one of wrestling with conscience preparatory
to conversion ia the ultra Republican faith.
No Reason Why, and No Prospect. —A paragraph in
Hatching’s California Magazine, states that “ there is
no reason why the California Magazine should not occu
py such a position in literature as does the State, in her
resources and commerce, among her proud sisters,” If
this were accompanied by the proprietor’s promise to
make bis publication correspond in mechanical feature
with the merit which could be given to its contents, we
should indorse his remarks. The magazine will not gain
the desirable position until he destroys bis cheap wood
cats and ceases to illustrate present California life with
descriptions which were ridiculous enough in style and
statement, seven or eight years since. His Magazine is
an injury to literature and good taste, and we wonder
that contributors, of considerable merit, will seek noto
riety where their efforts are placed ia company with old
and new nonsense. The last number, in the most litera
ry part of the work, tells us that,
“ The reason why cats are so musical at night, is be
cause they are so full of fiddle strings.”
Final Dismissal.— The Legislature has again refused
to admit Duncombe to a seat in the Assembly. The
foolish conduct of the antl-Democratic element in Sac
ramento deprived that county of a proper representation
and reflected no credit upon the managers. His ineligi
bility was no doubt understood at his first nomination,
and bis rejection by the Legislature as folly apprehen
ded. The intention was to create indignation toward
the dominant party, which would result in a general
outcry. But the means fell short ef the object, and old
loan Duncombe is a victim.
Su>vr Stats Progress—Three Brief Arguments
Thereon. —The Legislative introducer or a bill to regu
late the rates of interest on money in California, argues
that exorbitant interest has supplied ns with temporary
business relations and failed to combine confidence and
capital except in floating transactions. The Dernocratic
Standard argues that bad legislation is the cause of
every want of permanence and universal prosperity.—
We argue that importation of necessaries is the only
real disadvantage under which California progresses
slowly. Communication between the ports of Boston,
New York and San Francisco, has absorbed our gold
product and discouraged all our manufacturing facilities
and interests. Suppose we were joined in the State
chain next to Missouri, instead of Utah with its desert
and mountainous isolation. Would the mere rates of
interest on money, or the fact that unwise legislation was
a feature in our affairs, then materially affect the gener
al growth? The advancement of the joined States has
not been diversified in its character ; they have grown
with and out of each other and established mutual de
pendence. When California shall be connected with
them, in her will be the consummation of a continental
excellence, and for having been the isolated terminus of
State progress she will become the encircled starting
point of the returning and perfecting triumphs of civil
ization.
The Californians’ Register. —We have the prospec •
tus of “ The Californians' Register and Guide to the Pa
cific Coast," a publication projected by J. H. Still & Co.,
the very enterprising newsman of San Francisco. The
paper will be published in New York, and a head quarters
opened for Californians and those who are seeking
information respecting the country. We commend this
undertaking and hope the proprietors will meet with en
couragement from every quarter.
Another Suliivan Operation,— Sullivan, stationed al
San Francisco, hut whose newspaper operations extend
everywhere, has wade an arrangement for a special issue
of the Missouri Republican to be brought regularly by
the overland mail. A copy of the first issue has been
received by us ; the paper is small and contains a well
prepared summary of news. In this, as in all his enter
prises, Sullivan will gain the point aimed at.
The Weapons op Inferiority. —A Marysville cotem
porary, who has neither courage cor capacity to resist
statements which we had made upon the authority of his
own mean conduct, adopts the only means available to
the braggart—“ can have no controversy with a person
whose pusillanimity of nature gives immunity to his
scurrilous mendacity.” This and “ silent contempt ”
have been the weapons of established inferiority since
tho. introduction of newspapers. The .second is a key
te driveling weakness; the first distinguishes the cow
ardly bully,
!3verwhelshno Conviction. —Walker, the invader of
caragna, was recently admitted to membership in the
tholic church. The Mobile Mercury says: “He was
[to the fold by overwhelming conviction.” Perhaps
but the filibuster will ascertaiff'tbat the Catholic
arch does not encourage the" enterprise of country
aling, and will not protect him should be be led by
erwhelming conviction to the gallows, or oat to be
at.
ft '
; “We Want Wives.” —The JSTorthern Californian,
#hicb is published in Humbolt county, most beseeching
ly says i “We want wives I ” We suspect that it is cold •
and gloomy up there ; bat don’t let us mitigate the cry
|r“ We want wives! ” Keep up the yell until the country
is full of wives—wives! wives! w-i-ves! Let us take
■ e motto from the State device and insert, “ wives—we
want wives,” and when we get ’em, then and not till
||hea—“ Eureka I”
| Eight Mistresses of Fortune. —The New Orleans
Ijelta says that a steamboat recently arrived from Red
river In Texas, with a cargo of rich widows. Tbe aggre
gate wealth of eight was $6,000,000. Five millions of
dollars among eight widows—greatness gracious! and
all that money unhusbanded! What a misfortune that
eight poor but honest young men don’t combine with,
those mistresses of fortune 1
Properly Finished.— The Legislature refused to ap-*
propriate $50,000 to the Placerville and Sacramento -
wagon road. That measure was properly finished ; the
State should give no money to assist companies and
counties in road making. Where private capital doe*
not seek opportunities for investment, State funds should
not be entrusted.
Law and Sunday. —As we perceive no shedding of
tears in consequence of the legislative refusal to pass a
“ Sunday Law,” we conclude that the moral reformers
have not been informed in regard to the rejection erf
their bill.
The Pope and Popess.— On the arrival of the New
Year, 1859, the French general commanding in Rome to
protect His Holiness from liberty in Italy, was receiv
ed by the Pope in his audience chamber. The servile
Frenchman expressed what he termed the sentiments en
graven on the heart of his august Emperor, and, “ in
conclusion,” said :
“ When I contemplate the majesty of your throne, and
I see in yon a King, and what is more, a Sovereign Pon
tiff—the first exercising, like other monarchs, his tempor
al power within the limits of his States, an authority to
the support of which is devoted our entire foroe j the
second, still greater, exercising its spiritual authority
throughout the universe without any boundaries than
those of the globe itself: we ealnte, therefore, in year
sacred person, the monarch and the noble and worthy
successor of St. Peter.”
The Pope replied:
“On that brilliant day—less from'the son which was
shining on the Vatican than by the recoilbction of the
name given to the Son of Sanctity and Justice, Jesus
Christ the Savior of the world—be invoked) with all his
heart the benediction of Heaven on the Emperor and Em
press of the French, the Imperial Prince, the brave army,
and the entire nation ; and be prayed to God to support
his feeble arm for the good of all, in order that peace
should reign throughout the world.”
The General and his officers were then permitted to
kiss the Pope’s hand.
The Popess, or head of the Episcopal church, who is
Qneen Victoria of England, lately issued a proclama
tion, forbidding the use in future of special services in
the book of common prayer, for the three State holidays
known as “ The Gunpowder Plot,” “ Martyrdom of
Charles I,” and “ Restoration of Charles II.”
The Fate op Colbt.— Phil. T. Colby, formerly of
Moore’s Flat, in ibis county, has been appointed and
commissioned Marshal of Kansas. Colby once resided
in Sacramento, in the employ of Krainer, Quivy * Co.,
afterwards he was the confidential clerk of Hall Sc Rapp,
in this city. Removing afterwards to Moore’s Flat, he
entered into the grocery business on bis own acconnt,
and practiced law in opposition to Henry A. Moore, one
of the candidates for County Judge at the last election.
Colby is a rising genius.— Nevada Journal.
[NO. 7.

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