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The Sierra citizen. (Downieville, Sierra County, Calif.) 185?-1???, November 19, 1859, Image 1

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VOL. 6.]
THE SIERRA CITIZEN.
PUBLISHED AT DOWNIEVILLE EVERY SATURDAY MORNING.
—BT —
Homer King & T. L. Ham.
OFFICE IN THE POSTOFFICE BUILDING. DOWNIEYILLE.
TERMS— —'
Subscription—One year, to city subscribers, in advance. ..f6 00
One year, by mall or Express, in advance... 600
|Six months 3 00
Single copies 25
RATES OF ADVERTISING—
Half Square of five lines, first insertion 2 00
do do more than one insertion, each 1 00
One Square, first insertion 3 00
do more than one insertion, each.. 1 50
Special Notices— Twenty-five per cent, advance on above rates.
BOOKS, CARDS, HAND-BILLS, LEGAL BLANKS, and other de
scriptions of Job Printing executed with despatch, and on terms ac
cording with the times.
AGENTS FOR THE CITIZEN:
THOM AS BOTCE. Cor. Washington k Montgom’ry sts. San Francisco.
A. RANDAL k CO D street. Caeax Po»tAMBc»). Mawsvh.lb.
.s. C. CIIAPMA .’ Campionville.
O. F. ACKERLET Cox’s Bab.
H. S. BF.CK Eureka Citt.
O. S. BURNHAM Craig’s Flat A Morristown.
W. E. RILEY Chips’ Flat.
BUSINESS CARDS.
H. B. Cossitt, Downieville. G. W. Shultz, La Porte.
COSSITT & SHULTZ,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW,
Wm attend to all business entrusted to them in the Seventeenth Judi
cial District.
rw* Office in Dowkiztille, at the esd of Dcroak Bridge.
29
KIRKPATRICK 4c BALDWIN,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW,
Office opposite to the Court House,
tf DOWNIETILLE.
HARRY I. THORNTON, JR.,
Attorney and Counselor at Law.
Office on Bridge Street, at the End or Durgan Bridge.
DOWNIEVILLE, CAL. 8
O. B. TYLER,
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELOR AT LAW,
OFFICE— Next Door to the Citizen Office, Opposite Court House,
DOWNIEVILLE, Sierra County, Cai. lo
WILL CAMPBELL,
Attorney at Law,
OFFICE —On Bridge Street, at the North End of Durgan Bridge,
DOWNIEVILLE. 12 tf
WM. M. STRAY ART,
ATTORNEY AT LAW
DOWNIEVILLE. 4-tf
Francis J. Duns John Caldwell.
DUNN A CALDWELL,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW,
WILL PRACTICE in all the Courts of the 14th Judicial District,
and the supreme Court of the State of California. Residence,
Nevada City.
Dec. 14th, 1358. *C-tf
SI. P. BROWN,
Attorney at Law.
CHIPS' FLAT, SIERRA COUNTY. setf
ALANSON SMITH.
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELOR AT LAW,
WILL practice is the 14th Judicial District Court, and the Supreme
Court of the State.
Office on Jereey Flat, Downieville. l-33tf
M. A. KELLY, HI. D.,
Physician and Surgeon,
BRANDY CITY.
REFERENCES:— Drs. Lefbvre and Wayman, and X. L. Godfrey,
Forest City; John C. Fall and W. T. Ellis, .Marysville; and S.
Taylor, Brandy City. 46-6 m
J. H. WATMAN,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON,
FOREST CITY.
29-tf
I. E. JAMES
O o xx ty Surveyor.
Residence —Downieville. Office in the Court House, Durgan
Fiat. l * Sm
0. S. BURNHAM,
KTotar y Public,
CRAIG’S FLAT AND MORRISON’S DIGGINGS.
OFFICE, AT LANQTON’S PIONEER EXPRESS OFFICES.
Feb. 0,1856. Ltf
GEORGE WEBBER,
CONTRACTOR, CARPENTER, BUILDER, and
LUMBER DEALER,
ON DURGAN FLAT, DOWNIETILLE.
ar The best quality of LUMBER constantly on band and for
fialeT 80-tf
Randal Sc Co.,
NEWSPAPER ADVERTISING AGENCY,
D Street, near the Post-Office, Marysville.
AGENTS for the San Francisco and Sacramento Daily, Weekly
and Steamer Newspapers. Also,
AGENTS FOR THE “SIERRA CITIZEN,”
AND OTHER CALIFORNIA NEWSPAPERS.
pT All orders promptly attended to.
A. BADLAM,
REAL ESTATE BROKER,
And Newspaper Agent,
St, George Hotel, cor. J. 4c 4tli Rts., Sacramento.
Advertising Agency,
If. E, Corner Montgomery and Washington Sts.,
SAN FRANCISCO.
ADVERTISEMENTS and subscriptions received for the following
Papers:
THE SIERRA CITIZEN, Downieville;
Republican, Shasta ; Tribune, Sail Jose; Union Democrat, Sonora;
Placer Herald, Auburn ; Butte Record, Oroville;
San Andreas Independent; Amador Sentinel. Jackson;
Mountain Messenger, La Porte; Mariposa Democrat;
Pacific Sentinel,Santa Cruz; Siskiyou Chronicle, Yreka ;
Plumas Argus, Quincy; Alameda County Gazette ;
Solano County Herald, Benicia; Oregon Sentinel,Jacksonville, 0.T.;
Democratic Standard, Portland, O.T; Oregon Argus,Oregon City,o.T.;
Occidental Messenger, Corvallis, 0. T ; Placer Press, Auburn ;
Weekly Times, Portland, 0. T.; Tuolumne Courier, Columbia.
Having perfected arrangements for advertising in the principal pa
pers in the Atlantic cities, I am enabled to insert advertisements at
the lowest rates.
2-f THOMAS BOYCE, San Francisco.
BLANKS BLANKS! BLANKS!
LEGAL BLANKS of ail kinds for sale at the Citizen office—such as
Summon 1 , Subpoenas. Attachments, Executions, Warrants
Bonds, and afl blanks used by county officers.
Notice.
ON AND AFTER THIS DATE, we will receive Foreign Coin and
Private Gold and silver Coin at Mint value only.
LADD AGO.,
LANOTON A CO.
Downieville, May 14th, 1869. 19
DOWNIEVILLE, SIERRA COUNTY, CALIFORNIA, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 1859.
LEGAL ADVERTISEMENTS.
SHERIFF’S SALE.
NOTICE is hereby given, that under and by virtue of an Order of
gale to me' directed, issued out of the honorable District Court,
for the 17th Judicial District, County of Sierra, State of California,
on a judgment rendered therein on the 7th day of July 1858, in fa
vor of WM. 11. LADD and DAVID HOWARD and against W. M.
DOWNEY ET At., for the sum of Seven Thousand Four Hundred
and Thirteen Dollars, with four per cent, interest per month on the
same from the 7th day of July, ISSB, less a credit of eighteen hund
red and sixty-six 72-100 dollars given the 27fh day of October, 1858,
together with Eighty-seven Dollars and Sixty Cents, costs of suit, and
damages, as appears on record, with accruing costs, I have levied
upon, and seized, and will expose to sale, at public auction, in front
of the Court House Door, in the town of Downieviile, State and
County aforesaid,
On the 19th day of November, A. D. 1859,
between the hours of 9 A. M. and SP. M., all the right, title and in
terest of said defendants in anti to the following described property,
situated in Sierra County, California, to wit: —All the right, title
and interest of said defendants, W. M. Downey and C. S. Downey
in and to that certain part and parcel of Land situated in the town
of Downieviile, county of Sierra, and State of California, bounded
and described as follow s, to wit: Situated on the east side of Ne
vada street, in tow n, county and State aforesaid, and hounded on
the official map of Downieviile on the north by Yuba river, but in
fact by the lot ow ned by B. F. Sherwood, used as a tool house; on
the west by Nevada street; on the south by a lot formerly owned by
C. R. Shoemaker; and on the cast by the North Fork of the North
Yuba river ; being fifty-two feet in width and seventy-two feet more
or leas in depth, and now occupied by saidAV. M. Downey as a KbleT,
known as the “ Downie Hotel,” together with all and singular, the
appurtenances thereunto beloncing; and also all the estate, right
title and interest of said W. SI. Downey and C. S. Downey in and
to certain Mining Claims situated on the ridge near the town of
Monte Cristo, in the county and State aforesaid, known as the
Mining Claims of the “Ravine Tunnel Company; ” said interest
being one undivided twenty-fourth part of the whole of said claims:
together with all and singular the tenements, hereditaments and
appurtenances thereunto belonging or in anywise appertaining.
P. J. WHITE, Sheriff Sierra County.
By C. E. E. Ocnn, Deputy.
Wm. M. Stewart, Plaintiffs Attorney. 89ts
SHERIFF S SALE.
NOTICE is hereby given, that under and by virtue of an Execu
tion to me directed, issued out of the Honorable District Conrt
for the 17th Judicial District, County of Sierra, State of C alifornia,
on a judgment rendered therein on the 7th day of October, 1859,
in favor of SENECA McCRORY, and against DAVID KEARY, for
the sum of One Thousand and Ninety-three Dollars and Thirty
three cents, with four per cent, interest per month on the same from
the 7th day of October, 1859, together with Thirty-nine Dollars
costs of suit and damages, as appears on record, with accruing
costs, I h ive levied upon and seized and will expose to sale at
public auction, in front of the Court House Door, in the tow n of
Downieviile, State and County aforesaid.
On the 19th day of November, A. D. 1559,
between the hours of 9 o’clock A. M. and 5 o’clock P. M., all the
right, title and interest of said above-named Defendant in and to
the following described property, situated in Sierra County, Cali
fornia, to wit: —A certain lot or parcel of Mining Ground heretofore
known as Scribner & Co’s Claims; the same being situated at Mor
ristown, Sierra County, California, or so much thereof as will satis
fy execution and costs.
P. J. WHITE, Sheriff Sierra County.
89ts . By Richard Brows, Under Sheriff.
SHERIFF'S SALE.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that under and by virtue of an
execution to me directed, issued out of the honorable District
Conrt for the Seventeenth Judicial District, County of Sierra, State
of California, on a judgment rendered therein on the 2Cth day of
October 1559, in favor of EVAN JONES and against JNO. LEWIS
and THOS. EVAN.B, for the sum of Sixteen Hundred and Five Dol
lars, with three per cent, interest per month on the same from the
4th day of Oct. 1559, together w ith Twenty-four Dollars costs of suit,
and damages, us appears on record, with accruing costs, I have
levied upon and seized, and will expose to sale at public auction, in
front of the Court House Door, in the town of Downieviile, State
and County aforesaid,
On the the 19th day of November, A. D. 1859,
between the hours of 9 a. m. andsp. m., all the right, title and in
terest of said Defendants in and to the following described property,
situated in Sierra County. California, to wit: —The Ravine Tunnel
and Grounds at Monte Cristo, together with all the appurtenances ;
also, the California Tunnel and grounds, at Chapparal Hill, together
with all the appurtenances; also, the Vulcan Tunnel and Grounds
at the latter named place, together with all the appurtenances; or so
much thereof as w ill satisfy said execution and costs.
P. J. WHITE, Sheriff Sierra County.
40 By Richard Browx, Under Sheriff.
SHERIFF'S SALE.
"VTOTICE is hereby given, that under and by virtue of an Execu-
Fx (ior. ■ r... , c.d, ou; of .f. h.ii&raliu 111-., tv,, I
for the 17th Judicial District, County of Sierra, State of California,
on a Judgment rendered therein on the 2Cth day of October, 1859,
in favor of EVAN JONES and against D. A. WILLIAMS and BEN
JAMIN JONES, for tbe sum of Eight Hundred and Thirty eight
Dollars and Seventy-eight Cents, with three per cent, interest per
month on the same from the 4th day of October, 1859, together with
Twenty-four Dollars costs of suit, and damages, as appears on
record, with accruing costs, I have levied upon and seized, and will
expose to sale at public auction, in front of the Court House Door,
in the town of Downieviile, State and County aforesaid,
On the 19th day of November, A. D. 1559,
between the hours of 9 A. M. and 5 P. M., ail the right, title, and in
terest of said Defendants in and to the following described proper
ty, situated in Sierra county, California, to wit:—The Vulcan
Tunnel, Grounds, and all the appurtenances thereunto belonging,
situated at Chapparal Hill, in County and State aforesaid, or so much
thereof us will satisfy said execution and costs.
P. J. WHITE, Sheriff Sierra County.
40ta By Richard Brows. Under Sheriff.
SHERIFF'S SALE.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that under and by virtue of an Ex
ecution to me directed, issued out of the Honorable District
Court for the 17th Judicial District, County of Sierra, State of Cali
fornia, Hon. P. Vanclief, Judge, presiding, on a judgment rendered
therein on the 26th day of October, A. D. 1859, in favor of E.
JONES and against WM. JONES, for the Bum of Fourteen Hundred
and Nineteen Dollars and Eleven Cents, with three per cent, interest
per month on the same from the 4th day of October, A. D. 1859,
together with Twenty-one Dollars, costs of suit, and damages, as
appears on record, with accruing costs, I have levied upon and
seized, and will expose to sale at public auction, in front of the
Court House Door, in the town of Downieviile, State and County
aforesaid,
On the 19th Day of November, A. D. 1859,
between the hours of 9 a. m. and 5 p. m., all the right, title and inter
est of said William Jones in and to the following described proper
ty, to wit:—A certain Tunnel and set of Mining Claims, situated at
Monte Cristo, Sierra County, California, and known as the Ravine
Tunnel Co’s Tunnel and Grounds, together with all the appurten
ances thereunto belonging; or so much thereof as will satisfy said
execution and costs. P. .1. WHITE, Sheriff Sierra County.
40 By Richard Brows, Under Sheriff.
SHERIFF’S SALE.
■VTOTICE is HEREBY GIVEN, that under and by virtue of an
Txi Order of Sale, to ire directed, issued out of the honorable Dis
trict Court for the 17th Judicial District, County of Sierra, State
of California, on a judgment rendered therein, on the 7th day of
November, 1869, in favor of JOHN A. MONSELL and against J. A.
RETICKER and WIFE, for the sum of Seven Hundred and Thirty
six Dollars and Twenty-six Cents, with two per cent, interest per
month on the same from the 22d day of October, 1859, together with
Twenty-six Dollars and Fifty Cents, costs of suit, and damages, as
appears on record, with accruing costs, I have levied upon and
seized, and will expose to sale at public auction, in front of the
Court House Door, in the town of Downieviile, State and County
aforesaid,
On the 3d day of December, 1859,
between the hours of 9 A. M. and SP. M., all the right, title, and
interest of said Defendants in and to the following described proper
ty, situated in Sierra County, California, to wit:—All of that certain
Lot now occupied by J. A. Reticker and wife as their residence, and
lying in the town of Downieviile, County of Sierra, bounded and
described as follows: Commencing at the upper end of Jersey
Flat, on the road leading up the South Fork of the North Ynba river
at a mark on the flume on a boulder at the north-east corner of a
lot owned and occupied by D. O. Forman, for a store-house, and
running up along the road 40 feet to a mark on the flume, then at
right angles with the front line back to the river, and formerly
known as the Clement and Myres’ lot; also, all that certain Lot sit
uated on Jersey Flat aforesaid, adjoining the above-mentioned lot
on the west side, and being 18 feet front, and extending back to the
river; together with all and singular, the tenements, hereditaments
and appurtenances thereunto belonging or in anywise appertain
ing. 41 P. J. WHITE, Sheriff Sierra County.
SHERIFF’S SALE.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that under and by virtue of an
Order of Sale, to me directed, issued out of the honorable Dis
trict Court for the 17th Judicial District, County of Sierra, State of
California, on a judgment rendered therein on the 7th day of No
vember. 1859, in favor of SETH CHANDLER, M. C. Thurston, C.
P. Sheffield, B. J. Simons and against GEO. ATKINSON, O. C. Be
mls, C. H. Robins, J. Veeder, E. Chadwick, 11. S. Whiton, M. Thomp
son, V. Thompson, H. Varney, S. Winbern—known as the Engine
Co., for the sum of Four Hundred and Eighty-seven Dollars, with
ten per cent interest per annum on the same from the 7th day of
November 1859,together with Fifty-five Dollars and Sixty Cents costs
of suit, and damages, as appears on record, with accruing costs, I
have levied upon and seized, and will expose to sale at public auc
tion, in front of the Conrt House Door, in the town of Downieviile,
State and County aforesaid.
On the 3d Day of December, 1559,
between the hours of 9 a. m. and 5 p. m., all the right, title and inter
est of said Defendants in and to the following described property,
situated in Sierra County, California,to wit:—House, Dump Shed,
Stable, Blacksmith Shop, Pump, and all other wooden fixtures, im
provements and appurtences belonging to the mining claims of
said Engine Company, at Howland Flat, in said County and State;
together with seven hundred feet of Flume, extending north-east
erly from said claims ; said property-'being bounded on the west by
Snodgrass’ Stable and lot, on the east by Bachelor’s House and lot,
on the south by High street, and on the north by claims of St.
Louis Mining Co.; together with all and singular, the tenements,
hereditaments and appurtenances thereunto belonging or in any
wise appertaining.
41 P. J. WHITE, Sheriff Sierra County.
Notice.
TO all whom It may concern, take notice, that I, T. 11. FLETCHER,
have this day emancipated and released my son, JOSEPH H.
FLETCHER, of and from all obligations and liabilities growing out
of the relation between Father and Son, and that I do not and will
not claim the earnings and services of said Joseph H. Fletcher, and
that I will not be responsible for any debts by him incurred and
contracted.
Down! srlUe, November Ist, 1859. 49 41*
A Mixing and Engineering Coll^jk.— The S. F. Herald
learns from the London Times tbrUferrangements are now
being made for the establishment qf a college of mining,
engineering and manufacturing Science, in connection
with the University of Durham, and with preparatory
schools to be set on foot in the different colliery districts
in the kingdom, at which instruction will be given
adapted to the training of boys intended as managers of
mines or for engineering pursuits. We notice the pro
ject asjone worthy to be imitated inCalifomia. la these
days of railways and steam power, purveying and level
ing, it becomes a very important desideratum that we
should have good engineers and plenty of them. The
vast extent of our country, and the number and richness
of our mines, indicate that mining and engineering must
be important features for the development of our resour
ces for at least the next half century. But we proceed
to describe the intended college at Durham, so far as we
can obtain particulars. The ins'itation, though propos
ed to be locally situated within the limits of the univer
sity, is to be conducted on independent principles, and
managed by a governing body of its own. There are to
be five professors—one of KalheYn^ r '»^ > 3ae of natural
pwßte,puy and applied of ininarology,
geology and working mines ; one ol chemistry, and a
fifth of plan-drawing, leveling, survey ing and practical
engineering. The first professors will be provided by the
university, and the three last by the proposed college.
Lecture rooms will also be furnished by the university
for all the professors, and chemical laboratories, and
workshops, if necessary, by the college :
It seems, says the Fhiladelphia Inquirer , that the
general object sought to be attained, is the education, at
the cheapest rate, of all classes of mining and engi
neering students, to result eventually, it is to be hoped,
in practical and economical improvements in mining
operations from time to time, and in lessening the enor
mous waste of human life incident to that department of
industry. The students are to be of two classes—ma
triculated, and nou-matriculated, the former to reside in
some college, hall, or house licensed for that purpose by
the university, P.nd to be subject to its discipline : the
latter, if not resident with their parents, to live in lodg
ing houses licensed by the principal of the proposed col
lege, and, in special cases, in other houses not so li
censed. The matriculated students are to be admissible
to the academical rank of mining engineer and civil en
gineer, according to certain regulations passed in Jan
uary, 1855 ; and non-nnatriculated students are to be
admissible to a title of distinction to be hereafter agreed
upon. One especial object in view is to increase the
usefulness, by means of suitable instruction, of school
masters in the colliery district; and arrangements are in
contemplation for enabling the students to inspect
collieries from time to time, and acquire a knowledge of
their practical working. We may add that a committee
was recently appointed, consisting of Mr. Nicholas Wood,
the eminent colliery reviewer, whose whole life has been
identified with the practical management and supervi
sion of coal mines in Northumberland and Durham, Mr.
T. J. Taylor and Mr. J. L. Bell, to confer with the au
thorities of the university at Durham, to bring the pro
ject under the notice of the Government, and to take
other preliminary steps for the successful establishment
of the proposed College. Mr. Tremenhecre, the Com
missioner for inquiring into the state of the mining pop
ulation, in his report to the Horae Secretary, just pub
lished, refers to the advantages resulting from the en
gaging of a mining department on the Bristol Diocesan
School ; and also states that a very promising com
mencement has been made in the establishment of a
similar school at Wigan, in connection with the Meehan
ics’ Institution there. It commenced in March last, and
there has been an average attendance of about thirty
students. The students are mostly adults, er young men
between seventeen and of them
recently been made on the part of many of the leading
employers of mining labor in Lanarkshire and Ayrshire,
and other gentlemen, to set on foot a mining school.
Towards that object, a subscription of £4OO for three
years has been guaranteed, and tide managing committee
offer a salary of £250 per annum for a competent master.
Reliable Statement Concerning Washoe. —We were
shown, on Saturday, says the Saaaraonto Standard, by
a partner in a heavy mercantile house of this city, a let
ter from Carson Valley, written him by another member
of the firm, from which we are permitted to make the
following extract:
Genoa, Carson Valley, Nor. 2d.—The excitement
about the mines is still increasing, but is without good
reason. The mines are rich—immensely so—as far as
discovered, but the extent is limited, and people are not
justified in rushing here now, nor until further discover
ies shall have been made. By spring, something new
will be known. Returns will have been received, the di
rection, extent, etc., of the lead known, and the people
can act At present it is all excitement,
with no money and few facts. Carson City, sixteen
miles this side of the diggings, is fast building up, and
rents are as high as in Sacramento. Desirable lots are
held as high as SI,OOO to $1,500, and I saw fifteen feet
front sold at $350, and a frame house, twenty by twenty
five feet, rent for SBO per month. All this will be modi
fied by spring. They have the "50 times of Sacramento ;
gambling, from faro down to the “ little joker,” music in
the saloons, racing, etc. I send by stage, to Capt. Sim
mons, a sample of the ore.
Mocxt Vernon.— We learn from the Mount Vernon
Record that the work of putting Mount Vernon in good
condition, has been fairly Legun. Since the Ist of July,
workmen, under the superintendence of a competent gen
tleman, have been busily engaged in repairing out
houses, tracing and cleaning up the almost forgotten
paths, and fortifying, in some measure, the sacred spot
against the ravages of decay. The Record also states
that $15,000 of the fourth and last instalment for the
purchase of Mount Vernon has been already paid to Mr.
Washington, leaving only about $30,000 to be paid to
complete the purchase.
SHERIFFS SALE.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that under and by virtue of an
Order of Sale, to me directed, issued out of the honorable Dis
trict Court for the 17th Judicial District, County of Sierra, State of
California, on a judgment rendered therein on theSth day of No
vember, 1369, in favor of DAVID rg.ELPS, .ppd, against THOS. S.
CLARK, for the mm of Three Hundred and Eight Dollars and
Eighteen Cents, with ten per cent, interest per annum on the same
from the 4th day of January, 1859, together with Twenty-six Dol
lars and Sixty Cents, costs’of suit, and damages, as appears on
record, with accruing costs, I have levied upon and seized, and will
expose to sale at Public auction. In front of the Court House Door,
in the town of Downleville, State and County aforesaid,
On the 3d day of December, 1859,
between the hours of 9a. m. and 6 p. m., all the right, title and in
terest of said Defendant in and to the following described property,
situated in Sierra County, California, to wit: —That certain Build
ing or Dwelling House, built, owned and occupied by the said T. S.
Clark, situated on the south side of the North Fork of the North
Yuba river, near or adjoining the ranch known as Bailey’s Ranch,
near the town of Downieville, Sierra County, Cal.; the said house
and premises being the same now occupied by the said T. S. Clark;
together with all and singular, the tenements, hereditaments and
appurtenances thereunto Delonging <t in anywise appertaining.
P . J. WHITE, Sheriff Sierra County.
41 , By Richard Brown, Under Sheriff.
SHERIFF’S SALE.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, That under and by virtue of an
Execution, to me directed, issued out of the Honorable
District Court for the 17th Judicial District, County of Sierra, State
of California, on ajudgment rendered therein on the Bth day of No
vember, 1859, in favor,of WM. CUNNINGHAM andaginst ELISHA
BAKNES, Wm. Skelton, Wm. Glenn, J. P. -McLain, Jno. Bradbury,
Sampson Hicks, Tucker Vivan, Jno. James, Geo. Howard, Pasco M.
I 'arbis, A. Dibble, Vine E. Williams, and H. Copenharn, Jno. Doe
and Richard Roe, composing the American Company, for the sum
of $2,310 97 with ten per cent per annum on the same from the Bth
day of November, 1869, together with $49 costa of suit, and dama
ges as appears on record, with accruing costs, I have levied upon
and seized, and will expose to sale at public auction, in front of
the Court House Door, in the town of Downieville, State and County
aforesaid,
On the 3d day of December, A. D. 1859,
between the hours of 9 A. M. and 5 P. M-, all the right, title and In
terest of said Defendants in and to the follow mg described property,
situated in Sierra County, California, to wit;— All and singular, a
certain Quart* Ledge or Lode, situated on Chips’ Flat, Sierra coun
ty, and know n as the American Quartz Ledge, together with all the
privileges an appurtenances belonging or appertaining to said
Ledge or Lode; also, the steam Engine and Machinery used by the
said American Quartz Company, for the purpose of working said
Ledge or Lode, together with all and singular the hereditaments and
appurtenances thereunto belonging or appertaining; also, a Water
Ditch conveying water to the above described Quart* Mill • or so
much thereof as will satisfy COB
P. J. WHITE, Sheriff Sierra County.
41 By Biohaw Brows, Under Sheriff.
The Circassian Prophet. —Schatnyl, the celebrated
chief, priest and prophet of the Circassians—he who for
more than a quarter of a century defied, from the fast
nesses of the Caucasus, the whole force of Russia—has
been captured. He was betrayed for the largest amount
ever offered for the head of an offender—six millions of
roubles. The voice of the prophet chief will be heard
no more from his native cliffs, and his people must now
bow to the rule of the oppressor. lu a Russian dungeon
or the mines of Siberia, his days will end.
Schatnyl was born in 1797. Regarding his parents,
but little or nothing is known. He was educated in the
athletic sports of the Circassians, in which, including
the use of arms, he soon excelled his companions. As
he grew up, he was passionately fond of hunting, and in
ftilmbing the rugged mountains of his country, and in
being night after night upon them, he soon became inured
to the privations of the hunter, and prepared himself for
the difficult duties of a warrior chief. He exhibited a
marked sensibility to the beauty and sublimity of na
ture, and it is said he would often ascend a mountain at
the setting of the sun and remain there long after the
shades of night had fallen. While, however, he was
thus educating his physical powers, his mind was not
tJ3gleeted. When quite youmr.he was instructed in Ara
bic, and made familiar with the contents of the Koran.
Afterwards, he was instructed in Mahometan literature
and philosophy. His instructor was Dschebal Eddin.one
of the most learned of the Daghestan teachers of theolo
gy. By him, he was led through all the subtleties of the
Mahometan doctrines. The result of his teaching ap
pears to have been that he instilled into his pupil habits
of temperance, frugality and a perfect self-control.
On reaching manhood, Schamyl became a member of
the Government which was in fact a free Democracy.
He belonged to the Lesghian tribe, and by their system
of government he was chief, who, by general consent,
led their warriors to battle. In time of peace, however,
all were equal, though, in fact, he who possessed the
most ability, and was foremost in valor and the exercise
of all manly virtues, was chieftain. The public affairs of
the tribe were regulated in general assembly. The old
est and most experienced were heard first, but no one
could claim precedence as a right. The assembly rarely
made new laws, the tribe being governed by ancient cus
toms and usage. When these proved insufficient, an ap
peal was made to the Koran. Offenders were tried in a
council ring, and punishments consisted chiefly of fines.
Schamyl's name is first heard of in the wars for Cir
cassian independence in connection with the siege of
Himri, where he first served as a disciple of the chieftain
Khasi-Mollah. This leader commenced his career in
1830, having aroused his countrymen to arms against the
Russians by preaching a crusade in behalf of freedom
and the true faith. He asserted that the first great law
of Mahomet was the law of freedom, and the second was
that a Moslem should be a soldier of Allah, and an ene
my in arras to all infidels. At first, his career was suc
cessful, but at Himri it ended. During his retreat, one
chieftain after another deserted him, until only a faithful
few wore left with him. Among these were Schamyl.
Ensconced behind the walls of Himri, they awaited their
fate. The Russian artillery soon made sad havoc with
these walls, but those behind them met their fates gaily
singing verses of the Koran. Khasi-Mollab was killed,
and Schamyl, pierced by two balls, was left as dead. His
re-appearance among bis tribe was regarded as miracu
lous. Khasi-Mollah was succeeded by Hamsad Bey, and
the latter by Schamyl. In 1834, the Russians again ad
vanced upon Himri, but Schamyl attacked them and de
feated them, though their forces were far superior to his.
In consequence of this and other successes, he was re
garded as the greatest chieftain since Khasi-Mollah, and
many tribes that had favored the Russians now rallied
around the new leader. On all sides was heard the cry
“ Schmyl is Iman, and the second prophet of Allah.”
He issued proclamations tailing upon his countrymen to
join him in the war upon the Russians. His head-quar
ictU fc'.K at Akißgo, which is «<poTi ill' 'Op oi
an isolated rock, rising on one side perpendicularly six
hundred feet above the river Koissn, which nearly sur
rounds it. A narrow path winds up the rock in which
only two persons can walk abreast. Assisted by Polish
deserters, he complexly revolutionized the Circassian
method of defence. The Russians soon attacked this
place, and took it, by losing three thousand men.—
Schamyl, however, escaped. Thrice delivered out of
the hands of the infidels, his countrymen regarded him
with greater veneration than before. He now took up
his position at Dargo, where he was subsequently at
tacked by the Russian*, who lost in the engagement some
2,000 men. Since then, 1842, he has fought the enemies
of his country with varied success until the present time.
Schamyl, at the age of thirty-seven, is described as
distinguished in personal appearance as he was in char
acter and intellectual culture. He was of middle stat
ure, had fair hair, gray eyes, a small mouth, a Grecian
nose, and a complexion fair and delicate. His hands
and feet were small. He carried himself and had
naturally a noble air and bearing. He regarded himself
as an instrument of a higher power, and held that all
his thoughts and inspirations came immediately from
Allah. While his ordinary manner was calm, his elo
quence was fiery and persuasive. His usual dress was
the same as that of his countrymen, hut on special oc
casions he wore a white mantle as indicative of his
priestly character—the second prophet of Allah. He
had three wives, and his handmaidens were captive Rus
sians. As a ruler, he evinced much ability. He found
most of the different tribes of his country separated, not
only by customs and traditions, but often by blood feuds.
He managed to bring them into harmony, so that now
there is in Circassia a State. In place of many leaders,
there is now one supreme ruler, and law and order have
taken the place of usage and tradition. He also fused
the two opposing religious sects of Omar and AH, and
of the church thus formed he was the head. He was be
lieved to have held direct communication with Heaven
twice a year, retreating for that purpose to one of his
apartments, or to some cave. There he fasted and prayed
until he received the Divine commands. He had always
a body-guard with him, selected from his Murids. His
revenues were raised by the levy of a poll-tax of a silver
rouble upon every family. By economy, he had laid aside
a considerable amount for maintaining his government.
The number of his troops never exceeded twenty thou
sand, while the Russian army in Circassia, during the
past twelve or fourteen years, has numbered from one
hundred and fifty to two hundred thousand men.
The Twin Roses. —Far down a lone secluded valley,
seldom trod by the foot of man, by the murmuring brook,
whose pure waters wander through bright green fields
and shady lanes, grew, side by side, two rose bushes.—
Long had they grown together, nourished by the passing
stream, and hiding themselves from the rude gaze of the
world, happy and content in the solitude in which nature
had planted them. One bright summer's morning, two
green buds appeared upon the rose trees ; very small
they were at first, it is true, but day by day they grew
in size and beauty, each day growing lovelier, till one
morning there appeared upon the stems two beautiful
white roses. With strange delight they raised their
heads and looked tremblingly around, bat naught in the
green valley resembled themselves ; and with wonder at
their new-found existence, step by step they neared each
other, and twined themselves into one. No longer were
they unnoticed by all, save the pearly brook. The other
flowers of the field acknowledged their superiority and
bowed their heads before them ; but the twin roses heed
ed them not. All day long their perfume floated through
the valley, casting sweet incense on the summer air ;
and as night drew nigh, silently they crept together,
closed their pale leaves, and hung their modest heads
toward the stream. Then the bright stars came forth ;
the pale moon silently performed her journey on high ; the
tall trees bowed their green branches as the breeze swept
through them ; and the night birds sweetly sang till
morning dawned. # Once a pebble rolled down the moun
tain into the brook, causing its pure waters to dance on
all sides. Then the dew-drops kissed the pale roses;
and again the brook flowed on as before. Oh ! then how
beautiful was the valley! But the white roses were not
always to deck the stream. One day a rude hand culled
one of the flowers and bore it from its companion. Days
passed, but the now solitary rose held not up its head as
formerly ; silently it drooped, and finally withered—and |
the roses were soon forgotten by all save the brook in
the valley. Thus it sometimes is with man. When ■
those whom we long have loved and cherished are torn
from our side, we pine for them till we meet them again
in another world. Still the birds sing, the trees bend,
and the brook murmurs; but the twin roses will never
bloom again.
The Winans’ Steamer.— A correspondent of the Bos
ton Journal from Baltimore, gives the following account
of this novel boat, and eccentric owners:
I rode down to see the famous Winans’ steamer. It
lies otf a couple of miles from the main part of the city.
The steamer does not impress one very favorably. It
resenffbles a wine tierce, lengthened out 235 feet, and
coming to a point. The diameter, at the widest is but
sixteen feet, and the space fenced off on the top as a
deck is but five feet wide. A single rope runs down to
the point on either side to enable the sailor to reach the
extremity in case of need. The vessel is broken up into
compartments, and the sides of the chambers are used for
berths. The cosines are in the centre of the boat. But
so crowded are all the small apartments, that the steer
age, the cabins and engine rooms all seem to run into
the other, with the kitchen thrown in. It seemed as if
one was inside of a great boiler—which is the fact, ex
cept that the ends are sharp instead of being blunt. I
was exceedingly plea-od with the constructor and owner,
Mr. Winans. He seems to be anything but a visionary
man. His father, Ross Winans, and himself, Thomas
Winans, are the joint investors and owners of this new
craft. They made =• h*r-A--V.o«“ (Win.'-; the Russian
trade, and the father, I believe, is now in Russia. The
younger Mr. Winans is not far from forty years of age.
He is a man of vast wealth. He lives in princely style,
in the upper part of the city, and has a palace of walks,
statuary, works of art and taste, such as are seldom seen
in a city. Ills residence and grounds occupy a full
square. Some time since, complaint was made by some
of the fastidious that some of his statuary was not so
fully clothed as it should be. Mr. Winans said not a
word ; but he proceeded to build a close brick wall ten
feet high all around the grounds, and it looks like a
penitentiary yard without, and resembles Paradise with
in. He has a lodge at his high iron pate. No man can
enter the locked door till ho rings the bell and gets
permission ; and this can be gained by a stranger only
at certain hours of the day.
Mr. Winans contends that his vessel contains a princi
ple that will revolutionize the mode of constructing
steam vessels, and while his plan is not yet perfect, so
far all things have answered his expectations. The
steamer bas’made thirty three trips, and in all of them
has done all that he desired. She is wholly of iron ; she
has no keel, no sails, no mast, no rigging ; she Las a
rudder at either end, which answers for a keel. Her ma
chinery and her ballast are to keep her from rolling
over. When fitted for sea, she has on board 800 tons of
coal, carries 20 passengers, specie and the U. S. mails
She has made in her (rial trips the speed of eighteen
miles an hour. She has four engine-, with tbrcc-fold
more power than the most powerful steam packet now
built. As she lies in the water, she looks like a huge
cigar. One would as soon think of going to sea on a
Down-East log ; and as I traveled from stem to stern, I
could not avoid the conclusion that, from her build, her
construction, her tonnage, and all about her, she seemed
better calculated to land her passengers at Davy Jones’
locker than any other destination.
Somnambulism — Thrilling Incident. —An incident of
thrilling and almost terrible interest, combining in itself
all the palpitating chances of hair breadth escapes and
the strange romantic ventures of that weird semblance
of life, somnambulism, occurred night before last. The
scene was on Catherine street, at the residence of Mr.
Israel Morcton. At about half-past two A. M. he was
awakened by a knocking at the front door, and found a
man on the steps, who in a very incoherent and excited
manner, requested him to walk across the street and
look at the top of his house. He declined, and was
about retiring suspicious of foul play, when his eye
caught a moving shadow on the front of the opposite
house.
It indicated that rome moving, living thing was walk
ing iiO:sle; : siy along iho narrow ridge ol Lis roof. An
indefinable chill crept over him. The shadow stole across
the front of the opposite building, and was lost for a
moment in the darkness, and then crept into view again,
returning in an opposite direction, with the same slow
gliding motion. His companion had regained the op
posite sidewalk, and stood gazing up in silence, seeming
ly struck speechless with horror, and with trembling
steps, Mr. Moreton gained his side, when his gaze fell
upon a form shrouded from head to foot in a long white
night dress, about which a mass of long hair fell in wild
confusion.
This spectral form paced slowly to and fro on the nar
row ridge-board which covered the apex of the roof, ap
proaching in frightful proximity of the abrupt termina
tion at the ends, and calmly turning about to retrace
the distance. The house was a high one, and a misstep
or a stop too far would have plunged the nightwalker
down to certain destruction, 'the walker occasionally
raised her hand to her head, as though engaged in
thought or troubled with pain. The head always main
tained the same position. A chimney stood directly in
the middle of the roof, around which she passed with
ease, placing one hand upon its top, and walking down
the sloping roof to got around. Once In this spectral
walk she paused at the edge of the roof, and looked
straight ahead.
A waving movement of the right hand accompanied
the act, when the walk was again renewed. The same
spot was reached again a few moments after, when the
figure again paused, and again gazed out into the dark
ness, and then, with a slow motion, stretched out a hand,
and with outspread fingers clutched at something which
had no existence except in the fevered mind of the
sleeper. The other hand was extended in like manner,
and the body bent forward in such a way that the up
per portion hung over the abyss, while the fingers reach
ed oat, until there was no further reaching, and then
clutched again with a quick, convulsive snatch, and were
withdrawn. The form was motionless a moment; and
then commenced its walk again, continuing as far as the
middle of the roof, when it turned toward the rear of
the house, and moving down the slope of the roof was
lost to sight.
Mr. Moreton recognized the features and form of h's
servant girl, about 18, named Jane Mooney. She de
scended through a skylight to her own room. Hasten
ing in, he aroused his wife, and went with her to the
girl's room, and found her sitting on the side of the bed,
wide awake, and in a state of mind bordering on distrac
tion. She had no knowledge of the occurrence, but had
been awakened by the noise of her employer entering
the house, and found herself standing ia the middle of
her own room in the condition described. The girl ba<l
been suffering from a brain fever, from which she was
gradually recovering.— Detroit Free Press, 27 th Sept.
Hope. —There is no temper so generally indulged as
hope ; other passions operate by starts on particular oc
casions, or in certain parts of life ; but hope begins with
the first power of comparing our actual with our possi
ble state, and attends us through every stage and peri
od, always urging us forward to new acquisitions, and
holding out some distant blessing to our view, promising
us either relief from pain or increase of happiness.—
Hope is necessary in every condition. The miseries of
poverty, of sickness, of captivity would, without this
comfort, be insupportable ; nor does it appear that the
happiest lot of terrestrial existence can set us above the
want of general blessings ; or that life, when the gift of
nature and of fortune are accumulated upon if, would
not still be wretched, wmre it not elevated and delighted
by the expectation of some new possession, of some en
joyment yet behind, by which the wish shall be at last
satisfied, and the heart filled up to its utmost extent.—
Hope is, indeed, very fallacious, and promises what it
seldom gives ; but its promises are more valuable than
the gifts of fortune, and it seldom frustrates us without
assuring us of recompensing the delay by a greater
bounty.
Ditches. —It is estimated that there are not less than
7000 miles of water ditches in this State used for mining
purposes, which have been constructed at a cost not less
than $15,000,000.
The Cashmere Goat is now raised in Tennessee—
its weight ia silver was offered and declined a few days
since for the “ old goaf’ himself. The blood, with oua
quarter mix, produces wool worth SS a pound.
An Irishman went to live in Scotland for a short
time, and didn't like the country. “ I was sick all the
time I was there,” says he, “and if I had lived there till
tfcis time, Ed been dead a year ago,”
[NO. 42.

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