OCR Interpretation


The Jersey City news. (Jersey City [N.J.]) 1889-1906, March 02, 1889, Image 4

Image and text provided by Rutgers University Libraries

Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87068097/1889-03-02/ed-1/seq-4/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

AROUND NORTH HUDSON.
JIO TESt EXTS IX ALL KIXDS OF
CIRCLES VP THERE.
She ILsdy Friendships Have a Fall—
Union Dodge Dance—A Stormy Meet
log In West Hoboken.
Of the many residents of Union Hill
who will go to Washington, D. C., to
participate in the inauguration of
President Harrison, which takes place
on Monday, are Councilmen Frederick
C. Hansen, John Merritt, Chief En
gineer Henry Icke, George Reisen
berger and Otto Haege. While there
Mr. Reisenberger will seize the oppor
tunity to call upon his old friend
James G. Blaine and set forth his es
pecial fitness for the office of post
master of Union Hill. The only op
ponent Mr. Reisenberger has, that he
rears, is Mr. Robert Doulanger. whose
Sersonal acquaintanceship with Presi
ent-elect Harrison makes him a for
_-i'Ll_ a_
MtiUUUlV AVVI
Union Lodge, No. 2,961, Knights of
Honor, met last night at Odd Fellows
Hall and initiated August Bode, Henry
Schmeir and Charles Hund. Six others
were balloted for and elected. They
were George Knipper, Frederick Mis
kam, George Frank, Charles A. Hund,
August Aiscli and Christian Weigele.
After the meeting the members of
the lodge repaired to the banquet hall
below, when they partook of a boun
tiful collation. After the cloth was re
moved there were addresses by Dicta
torBayer, Gustav Fouch, Charles P.
Schneuriger and others. Mr. Charles
Toeres, the versitile artist, gave an
evening “dish pan” solo. There was
music and plenty of singing by the
company. It was late when the con
vivial party broke up.
The annual meeting of Union Hill
Hook and Ladder Company No. 1 took
place last night, when the following
officers were elected: Adam Miller,
foreman; Frederick Dietz, assistant
foreman; C. P. Schnenriger, secretary,
and Otto Paul, treasurer. The trustees
elected are Charles Bogle, Gus Wett
ner and Frederick Dietz.
The Rev. Dr. Gowan will conduct
special services at the Grove Street
Church both morning and evening to
morrow.
An enjoyable affair was the recep
tion given by the Lady Friendships, a
social organization of Union Hill, at
Himion’s Military Hall last night. The
handsome hall was in a blaze of
light and the decorations were
tasteful and artistic. The company
was select, as it was an in
vitation affair. The committee
of the party were the Misses Mary
Johner, Louisa Refiners, Clara Strath
msn and Messrs. Chris. Hekel, Gus
filer and Louis Roam. Among those
■resent I observed John Ackerman
,nd wife, William Aekerson and wife,
K7ill{nm flfitlwoll nrwl wifo Tneenh
Iiier and lady, William Englebrecht
nd Miss Nettie Johner, Charles
mtz and lady, J. Herold and wife,
lenry O’Brien and lady, Frederick
ohnerand Miss Carl, Dave Barreta
nd lady, Ed. Watson and lady,
Charles Strathman and lady, Eddie
Jinscheid and lady, Dudley Gorman
kid lady and about one hundred more.
Ihe music was by Prof. Ninger and
las excellent, as was also the supper,
Biieh waspartaken of at midnight.
■The annual ball of the Pastime Base
Ell Club, of West Hoboken, will take
Lee at Ruth’s Hall on Monday night.
Vhe commissioners on the High
Hut avenue opening had a stormy
tjsion in the West Hoboken Town
f 11 last night. Many property own
!r§‘ who had been assessed for the
mprovement appeared before the
Commissioners, and objected to the
issessment on the ground that their
iroperty was situated so far from the
mprovement that they received abso
lutely no benefit at all, yet still they
were asked to put their hands in
their pockets and pay. Among those
who were most energetic in their de
nunciation of the assessment were
Messrs. Frederick Engle and Gustav
Koch. The Commissioners will hold
another meeting.
Eva Eiler is a young lady who ob
jects to being called hard and unjust
names. She resides on Union Hill and
among her acquaintances is one Julius
Hinder. Yesterday he spoke slight
ingly of her character and she resented
the indignity by going to Recorder
Schleicher and getting a warrant for
>l{er defamer’s arrest. Officer Smith
brdugw the culprit to court, where he
was held’tp $jf^0 bail.
The PJoriels«i Stove Pipe Guards
dance and make merry at Fromchen’s
Hall, Union Hill, tonight. It will be a
— jnllgfcracket. *
The annual reception and ball of
Germania Schutzen Bund Union Hill
Company No. 2, Captain Rudolph
Freon, will take place at Rullis Hall,
tonight. It promises to be a brilliant
affair.
A call has been issued for a meeting
at Loop’s Hall, Union Hill, to be held
next Wednesday, for the purpose of
organizing an Independent Citizens’
Association. The new organization
will take an active part in local politics
this spring.
Ex-Freeholder Freeh has returned
to his old quarters at Peter’s brewery.
The jolly Friendship Club will cele
brate the forty-second anniversary of
the birth of Sport Arnold Loop at
Friendship Hall tonight. Great pre
parations have been made for the
event, and if there isn’t a jolly time,
then there is no merit in Union Hill
beer or vitality left in the boys. The
affair will conclude with a banquet.
Mrs. Neckel, the respected mother
in-law of Mr. John Helstern, was
buried from her late residence on Lib
erty street, Union Hill, yesterday after
noon. _
Advertise for Servants,
Advertise for Situations,
Advertise for Rooms.
Advertise for Tenants
In the SUNDA Y MORNING NEWS.
EASTON WAS CHOSEN.
ffhe Atlantic Baseball Association Is Now
Organized.
The Atlantic Baseball Association held
a special meeting at the Fifth Avenue
Hotel yesterday afternoon and evening to
perfect its list of associate members, and
after a long discussion Hartford and
Easton were admitted.
The following delegates were present:
P. T. Powers, Jersey City; J. W. Collins
and J. W. Shoemaker, Newark; H. L.
Spence and G. W. Curtis, New Haven ; J.
8. Cosgrove, Lowell; Mr. Lang, Hartford;
Howard Muchler and H. W. Putnam,
Easton; W. W. Burnham, Worcester, and
P. T. Powers represented Wilkesbarre by
proxy.
Messrs. Hill and Wagner, of Philadel
phia, and W. 8. Arnold, of Albany, were
In attendance to press the claims of that
Blub for admission, but by a vote of 4
to 3, the delegates Anally decided Eas
ton would be the most desirable member
to complete the circuit, as it bus local
backing, while Albany is backed with
Philadelphia capital. In addition to this,
the location of that town is more favor
able in a point of distance from other
clubs, Albany being geographically out
side the line. , .
The full list of the associate members of
the Association is as follows: New Jersey,
Newark, Lowell, Worcester, New Haven,
Wilkesbarre, Hartford and Easton.
READY FOR THE FRAY.
Important Mills Are Coming Up for Dis
cussion at Trenton Next Week.
[Special to the Jersey City Neil's.]
Trenton, March 2,1889.—This wiU be a
great week for eloquence unless all signs
fail. The eloquence will be supplied on
tap by the Republicans, who, finding that
they are not able to successfully oppose
the passage of certain measures proposed
by the Democrats, have about decided to
keep up one continuous howl for all they
are worth. The gorgeous stained glass
skylights of the House and Senate
will pale before the florid flights of oratory
which are now preparing in many a town
and hamlet, and while the sky is compara
tively safe from damage, it would be an
adventurous insurance company which
would take a risk against the cracking of
those skylights by the words of indigna
tion and scorn which will be uttered.
Senator Edwards is likely to have to bear
the brunt 0* the fighting on the Demo
cratic side in the Senate, and if he has any
consideration for the feelings of his Repub
lican colleagues he must quickly allow
himself to be withered with their scorn.
The first measure likely to provoke
UUUU1C JLO LUO M CiOO C-Avitrv will. **
full Democratic strength is present, it will
be brought out. Senator Baker will of
fer his amendments, which have hereto
fore been described in The Jersey City
News, and they will be adopted ns soon
as the Republicans kindly stop talking.
There seems to be no doubt that the bill
and the amendment will slide through as
quickly as the Democratic Senators can
push it. What its fate will be in the
House is more uncertain, although Presi
dent Werts, of the Senate, Colonel Hep
penheimer and the other leaders believe^
that it is all right, What opposi
tion there muy be will come chiefly
from Essex county, where objections
are made to the provision allowing licenses
to be revoked by the Courts, as well as by
the bodies granting them, and from coun
ties where local option has been adopted,
and which have since sent members to
Trenton with the express mission of abol
ishing local option. Although brewers
and liquor dealers in cities are willing to
accept the measures as the best that can
be accomplished this year, those in
smaller town3 and in dry counties are in
clined to feel that their interests have not
been sufficiently conserved. This is a
source of danger. From what Senator
Baker has said, it is doubtful if he would
vote again for the bill if it were sent back
to the Senate with amendments in the
House.
Senator Edwards’ bill to provide a new
charter for Jersey City, with single headed
commissions appointed absolutely by the
Mayor, is about drawn up. He took it
back to Jersey City with him to show to
the leaders there, and it may be presented
any time this week. It will first he sub
mitted to the conference of Hudson county
members for approval. As it is drawn it
will not excite the opposition of Newark, it
hpUpvprl
Another bill which Senator Edwards
has in charge, and which is expected to
come up for second reading this week, is
the redistricting bill. This will excite
louder howls on the Republican side than
even the excise bill. On the latter they
only care to make a record for themselves,
but the matter of redistricting affects
them vitally. The bill is probably as
equitable a measure as regards both sides
as could be prepared ; but it is a natural
aud inevitable result of the rearrange
ment of boundaries that some heavy Dem
ocratic majorities should fall on Republi
can corns. The Republicans have for so
long been in possession of districts to
w hich they were not entitled that being
evicted from power will come hard to
them.
The Hudson county members are ask
ing when the appointment for lay judge of
Hudson will be made. There is no indica
tion that Governor Green has decided upon
whom to bestow the prize. The running
seems to be very even between Judge
Davis and Albert Hoffman, with Judge
Beach, a dark horse, well up. Of the two
leaders there seems to be no doubt that
Judge Davis would win if the matter lay
with the individual members of the Hud
son county delegation. He is warmly
supported by Senator Edwards and As
semblymen Norton and O’Neill, and
Speaker Hudspeth among others. Hoff
mau is the present interpreter of the
Court and is backed by Assemblymen
Heppenheimer, Francois and Fagan. Be
sides these he has a very large outside
backing, who are pushing him for all they
are worth. It is admitted that both gentle
men are well qualified for the post. One
of the possibilities of the race is that Gov
ernor Green may be unable to decide be
tween the two, and that as a result Judge
Beach, who is the incumbent, may serve
another term.
There w-ill be trouble this week unless
members are more punctual in attend
ance. Speaker Hudspeth’s blood is up,
and,Sergeaut-at-Arms Corist will have a
job on hand if there are as many vacant
seats as there were last week.
MR, MILLS’} WEEK'S WORK.
Both Mr. Brett nnd Himself Express Sat
isfaction with Results.
At least 1,200 people thronged the Ber
gen Reformed Church last evening to hear
Evangelist B. Fay Mills preach his closing
sermon. His text was:
Behold 1 stand at the door and knock.—Rev.
iii„ 20.
Mr. Mills was Intensely in earnest and
exhort ed his audience In fervent accents
to lead the life of the Christian.
While Mr. Mills was speaking about 300
of the regular congregation assembled In
the lecture room and were led in prayer
by Rev. I. W. Hathaway of the Westmin
ster Presbyterian Church. A pathetic
story was told by the evangelist of his old
family doctor, who deferred joining the
church from day to day until Anally in
temperance led to despondency and de
spondency to suicide. His voice quivered
as he spoke and tears streamed down
many a cheek.
When Mr. Mills completed his sermon
nearly 300 people asked for prayer.
The evangelist then distributed cards
to be inscribed with the name and ad
dresses of those who have attended the
several services, under the words: “I de
sire henceforth to lead a Christian life.”
Not a little has the expressive singing
of Mr. Lawrence Greenwood increased the
effectiveness of the discourses. Like Mr.
Mills, Mr. Greenwood is heart and soul en
gaged in the work, and regards it as a
labor of love.
©Mr. R. Mott, their organist, was taken ill
after the services on Thursday evening,
and was obliged to retire to his home m
Philadelphia.
When interviewed last evening Evan
gelist Mills expressed himself as much
pleased with the result of the week’s work.
“We have made hundreds of converts,”
he said. “Enemies of years have become
reconciled, and I could instance numbers
of interesting cases did not the nature of
my work forbid it.”
“The services have been wondrously
successful,” said Rev. Mr. Brett, the pas
tor; “the number of converts will run into
the hundreds. Tomorrow morning Mr.
Mills will preach to the young people in
the Westminster Presbyterian Church.
He will repeat his sermon at the Bergen
Baptist Church in the afternoon. The
evening services at the same church will
be for young men only, commencing with
a sendee of song at 7:15.
While Mr. Mills is preaching to the
young men, Mrs. Isabella C. Davis, whose
work in organizing the society of the
King’s Daughters is so well known, will
conduct services for women at the Bergen
Presbyterian Church.
Revs. D. J. Ellison, T. W. Hathaway,
Charles Herr, William Moore, C, Brett,
G. W. Nicholson and A. A. Bedell were
among the clergymen present on the plat
form Gist evening.
AMUSEMENTS.
LUDWIG’S IRISH CONCERT,
TABERNACLE, MONDAY, MARCH 4ft.
ARTISTS^ADFXAIMMUI^N.M^sANN^.
Mr. C. KENDAL IRWIN, aud
WM. IiUDWIG,
In a choice programme of
IRISH SONGS, IRISH BALLADS,
IRISH LYRICS.
POPULAR PRICES—S5c., 50c., 75c. Concert at 8.
Doors open at 7. Scats in advance at Harrison's Sta
tloneryStore, 16 Exchange Place.
^IBLO'S. _ 50c.
MR. E. G. GILMORE, Reserved Seat*.
Lessee and Manager. Orchestra Circle.
LAST 7 TIM ES, „ _ ^ ®alcony*
LAST 5 NIGHTS, BOLOSSY
LAST TWO MATINEES. KIRALFY S
WATER QUEEN.
A GRAND SPECTACLE.
Lost Wednesday Matinee tomorrow at 2.
NEXT WEEK—Maud Granger—“Two Lives.”
Academy. 25o„ coc.
CADEMY. . „ „ S1
Gilmore & Tompkins.proprietors and Managers.
DENMAN <S>-& DBHMASr
THOMPSON. T THE old THOMPSON.
[ H—O-M-E-S-T-E-A-D. ?
Wednesday aud Saturday Matinees. Seats ready
to April 3U.
Grand opera house.
Take the Erie Ferry, foot of Pavonia avenue.
Reserved Seats, Orchestra Circle and Balcony, 50c.
ESN PAUL KAUYAR |ES:
Next week, ROBERT MANTELL._
Next Sunday, SAN FRANCISCO and the PAR
WEST, by PROP. CRoJIWELL.
MINER’S PEOPLE’S THEATRE.
Only thirty minutes from Cortlandt street Ferry.
MINNIE PALMER
IN MY SWEETHEART.
ONLY MATINEE SATURDAY.
HARRIDAN'S PARK THEATRE.
EDWARD HARRIGAN.Proprietor
M. W. HANLEY.Manager
MR. EDWARD I PETE.
HARRIGAN'S PETE.
TRULY NATURAL I PETE.
CHARACTER ACTING OF | PETE.
Dave Bratanm and Ills Popular Orchestra.
WEDNESDAY-MATINEE-SATURDAY.
THE TURF. _
HUDSON COUNfr RACING ASSOCIATION,
GUTTENBERG, N. J.
Every Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday. Take car
to Union Hill from Hoboken Ferry, direct to track
without change. First race at 2 o’clock. Admission
50 cents. Rain or Shine.
S. WHITEHEAD, Secretary.
PL UMBERS.
' " M. A. SHANAHAN,
Practical Plumber,
PLUMBING AND GAS FITTING.
Sanitary Work a Specialty.
515 Grove Street, Jersey City.
All orders promptly attended to.
ML 3P. M03RiS.1T,
Plumber and 4was Fitter,
553 Grove Street, J. C.
Estimates for all work cheerfully given and orders
promptly attended to. , .
Repairs lor stoves and ranges furnished. Also
roofs, leaders, etc., made and repaired.
PETER T. DONNELLY,
PRACTICAL PLUMBER AND GAS FITTER,
Sanitary Plumbiny a Specialty.
2B3 Washington Street, J. C.
Estimates Furnished, All Work Guaranteed
3P. 33. MAJRTTiNr,
Practical Sanitary Plumber
AND STEAM FITTER.
HEATERS AND RANGES A SPECIALTY.
189 Montgomery St., Jersey City.
_ FOB SALE.
ICE BOX AND COUNTERS FOR SALE CHEAP.
X Suitable for Milk, Grocery or Florist Store. Call
at once, No. 134 Newark Avenue.
C. M. CLERIHEW,
ERIE GOAL YARD
Cor. Twelfth, and Henderson Sts.
Telephone 248.
GFOBGF W. LAB AW,
ARCHITECT!
ROOMS 92 AND 93 WELDON BUILDING,
76 Montgomery Street.
rj>0 WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
Be it known that I, John O’Reilly, am engaged in
the manufacture of and sale of mineral waters and
other beverages, in the city of Jersey City, County
of Hudson aud State of New Jersey, and having to
use and using bottles and syphons in my said busi
ness, in which my said mineral waters and other
beverages arc put up for sale, and in accordance
with the statute in such case made aud provided, I
do hereby certify that my bottles and syphons are
made of glass, having impressed upon the surface
of such bottles the name, letters, figures and words,
to wit: Excelsior Bottling Works, 829 & 331 Newark
ave., Jersey City (monogram), E. B. W., and this
bottle hot to be sold; syphons, with the words John
O’Reilly, Jersey City, trade mark registered, and the
form or a harp etched on the glass.
Witness my hand this 20th <lay of February, in the
year of our Lord one thousand eight huudred and
eighty-nine. JOHN O’REILLY.
1’iiA wjl'uj\s, js uwijuh,
Surreys, Carts, Etc.
SHAFFER’S,
390 Palisade Ave., J. C. Heights.
Also, some Second-Hand ones on h«nd.
RAILROADS.
INaUeUR&TiONTRaSMS
TO
WASHINGTON
VIA
Pennsylvania Railroad.
For the accommodation of visitors to the Inaugura
tiou, the following trains will be run from
NEW YORK to WASHINGTON on
Saturday and Sunday, March 2d and 3d.
Leave New York, Stations foot of Cortlamlt
and Desbrosses Streets,
On SATURDAY, 6,20, 8.00. 8.30, 10.00
(Limited Express), 10.10 A. At, 1,00, 2.00,
3.40 (Congressional Limited Express), 4.30,
9.00 P. M., and 12.15 night.
On SUNDAY, 6.15, 8.30, 10.00 (Limited
Express), 10.10 A. M., 1.30, 3.40 (Congressional
Limited Express), 4.30, 9.00 P. M., and 13.15
midnight.
The above trains will be run in as many
sections as the demand of travel requires.
PARLOR CARS ON DAY TRAINS.
PULLMAN SLEEPING CARS ON NIGHT
TRAINS.
Returning, trains will leave Washington every
half hour after the conclusion of the Inaugural
Ceremonies, and for the benefit of those who de
sire to leave immediately after the ball, a Special
Train will leave at 2.00 A. M.. March 5th, arriv
ing in New York, 8.30 A. M., stopping at princi
pal stations.
For tickets, parlor and sleeping-car accommo
dations, apply at the following ticket offices: Nos.
1, 435, 849 and 944 Broadway, No. 1 Astor House,
and foot of Desbrosses and Cortlandt streets; No.
4 Court street, and Brooklyn Annex Station, foo«
of Fulton street, Brooklyn; 75 Hudson street, Ho
boken; Station, Jersey City.
CHAS. E. PUGH, J. R, WOOD,
General Manager, General Passenger Agent.
\ / i
T. C. BROWN &VAN ANGLEN,
21 Newark Ave. and 128 Montgomery St., J. C.
SPECIAL SALE
Linen Handkerchiefs,
FOR O.VJE WEEK,
COMMENCING MONDAY, MARCH 4th.
1 Lot Ladies’ Colored Borders, Hemstitched, 4c.
each; real value, 6c.
1 Lot Ladies’ Colored Borders, Hemstitched, 5c.
each; real value, 7c.
1 Lot Ladies’ Colored Borders, Hemstitched, 6c.
each; real value, 9c.
1 Lot Ladies’ Colored Borders and Plain White,
Hemstitched, 9c. each; real value, l2^c.
1 Lot Ladies’ Colored Borders and Plain White,
Hemstitched, 12^c. each; real value, 17c.
1 Lot Ladies’ Colored Borders, Hemstitched, good
quality, 15c. each; real value, 20c.
1 Lot Ladies’ Handkerchiefs, Embroidered in
colors, choice patterns, 21c. each; real value,
35c.
1 Lot Ladies’ White, Embroidered, New Designs,
25c. each; real value, 35c.
1 Lot Men’s woven, uoioren nvrueia, ucuuuo,
All Linen, lt’MSc. each; real value, 16c.
1 Lot Men’s Hemstitched, Colored Borders, 12Hc.
each; real value, 18c.
1 Lot Men’s White, Hemstitched, All Linen, 12^c.
each; real value, 18c.
1 Lot Men’s Hemstitched, Colored Borders and
Plain White, 28c. each; real value, 85c.
1 Lot Men’s Hemmed, Tape Borders, Large Size,
All Liuen, 12Hc. each, real value, 18c.
1 Lot Men’s Hemmed, Tape Borders, Full Size,
All Linen, 15c. each; real value, 20c.
1 Lot Men’s Hemmed, Tape Borders, Large Size
and Fine Quality, 18e. each; real value, 25c.
1 Lot Men’s Hemmed, Tape Borders, Extra
Quality, Large Size, 25c. each; real value, 85c.
Finer Grades at Equally Low Prices.
STORE CLOSES AT 7 P. HI., EXCEPT SATURDAY.
FRANK STEVENS, Auctioneer,
Office, 55 Montgomery Street, Jersey City,
NEXT AUCTION SALE
-OF
Real Estate, Stocks, and Bonds,
ON THURSDAY, MARCH 2I,’89, AT 2 O’CLOCK, P.M.
Particulars at the Office of Telephone Call S3.
/'K.I.VA' SYJSFEJVS, 55 Montgomery Street.
- -V . .-L-M-! -
For Sale
One Upright
Boiler and
Smokestack,
ONE VERTICAL FIVE
f
Belting, Shafting
• *
*—and Piping.
Seven Compositors’ Stands
anti Frames;
Fifty-Six Cases, a News
paper Bress of Brevier
and Nonpareil Type.
ALL IN GOOD ORDER.
Also, a good assortment of
Job Fonts
This is a rare oppor
tunity for a Weekly or
Country Newspaper to
secure a good outfit at
moderate cost. ,
Address,
The Jersey City News Co.,
NO. 80 MONTGOMERY ST., JERSEY CITY.
. __
COSTUMES, MASKS AND WIGS TO HIRE
AT Mine. GX.KNDINN1NGS,
83 Montgomery Streot, Opposite this Office
tEEKlESS DYES
203 Newark Ave.,
Three Doors above Jersey Avenue, J. C.
J Ansa O. MW1J. UVUii u.
ERWIN & KELLER,
Attorneys and Counsellors at Law
COB. MONTGOMERY AND WASHINGTON STS.,
JERSEY CITY.
Weldon- Building, Rooms 69, TO and Tl.
HIGHEST PRICE PAID!
OLD BOOKS MAGAZINES UNO LIBRARIES
BOUGHTI
B. Scarbora,
94 Montgomery St., J. C.
New books supplied at a liberal discount from pur
chasers’ prices. Call or send .for bargain catalogue
of 76 pages; free to all on application.
Try #1.50 and #2.00 Ladies’ and Gents
Shoes, in all styles, as good as sold
elsewhere for #2.00 and #3.00.
ALL GOODS WARRANTED.
ID. vrain,
MONTGOMERY STREET, near cor. Washington,
20 NEWARK AVENUE, and
223 NEWARK AVENUE, cor. Coles Street.
WM. H. MILLER,
Klorxs'T,
LATE OF THE JERSEY CITY FLORAL DEPOT,
335 Barrow Street, near Newark Avenffe.
ARTISTIC FLORAL DESIGNS.
Handsome Funeral Work a specialty. All kinds of
seeds and plants. The choicest of Flowers at mod
erate prices. Fresh Flowers dally.
DWYER’TOpHESTRflr
M usic Funished fo Picnics,
Balls, Sociables, Etc.
BRASS BANDS A SPECIALTY
SO. 7 MERCER ST., J. C.
mnst v mVYF.R.. . Leadpr
FRAZERgrease
BEST IN THE WORXD.
Its wearing qualities are unsurpassed, actually
outlasting two boxes of any other brand. Not
effected By heat. ESfGETTHK GENUINE.
FOR SALE BY DEALERS GENERALLY.
DETECTIVES
Wanted in every county. Bhrewd men to act tinder
instructions in our eecret service. Experience not
necessary.. The International Detective, the official
paper of theMureati.oontainsaract likenesses of crim
inals wanted. and for whose/capture largo rewards
are offered. Send 2c. stamp for particulars. Address,
Grannan Detective BureauCo.44Arcade, Cincinnati, 0.
■. ■
A Rare Treat, j
Sunday Morning News.!
i
THE REGULAR
SUNDAY EDITION
OF THE
Jersey City mews
Now Appears in a New Shape.
EIGHT PAGES
Full of Spicy and Interesting Articles
by Special Waiters from all
over the "World.
Price, Three Cents.
IT CONTAINS:
All the Social Events of the City.
♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
National, State and City Politics.
Cable and Telegraph Dispatches.
State News by Special .Corres
pondents.
Trenton Legislation Magnified
for the People.
• . . • • ,•. .1 «aSB
Bill Nye’s Latest Agonies.
Gcood Stories by Well-Known
Authors.
Short Special Stories, Witty Par
agraphs.
❖<»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦
Religious News of Interest.
-. .- .-V v ^ ^ r A * A A JTA’a'aTa a'Xaa"
<♦><*><•> <&<$><$><$ <$<& Vyytys/
ORDER FROM YODR DEALER
ITODAY.
V- (T . : ■ , . ^ M

xml | txt