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The Jersey City news. (Jersey City [N.J.]) 1889-1906, March 28, 1889, 5 O'CLOCK EDITION, Image 3

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Persistent link: https://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn87068097/1889-03-28/ed-1/seq-3/

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HOBOKEN THESPIANS OFFENDED.
Father Corrigan'* Sermon Hit the Dram
atic A**oeatiton Very Hard.
The contemplated entertainment of the
Hoboken Dramatic Association is in
I definitely postponed. It was to have been
given in aid of St. Mary’s Church.
The principal of the many causes Is the
fact that Father Corrigan put a damper
on it in a sermon he preached Sunday be
fore last. lie then criticised plays
and playgoers In a very unfavor
able manner, and his remarks of
fended many members of the Dramatic
Association. Miss Tillie Huncke is
very indignant. She said that she was
instrumental In getting up the affair, but
had nothing to add to this statement ex
cept that she was offended. She hail a
good deal of trouble in cancelling engage
ments which had been made.
, Father Corrigan said that he was criti
cising plays and theatregoers generally,
and did not intend to preach at the Hobo
ken Dramatic Association in particu
lar. They had taken offence at his
remarks and had not asked for any ex
planation. He had preached similar ser
\ mons many times before without produc
I ing any such result. He was at a loss to
I understand the action of the association.
It One young lady, who stipulated that her
name be not mentioned, remarked
& tersely:—“When we gave the last enter- >
' tninnient at Jacobs’ Theatre and realized
$300, we offered the money to
Father Corrigan, and he accepted
it with a profusion of thanks.
Our motives are sincere. We labor in a
| good cause. We proposed to give another
entertainment for the benefit of the
L church, and we think it bad grace on the
Ilk part of Father Corrigan to criticise us as
tjf. he did.”
Dramatic exhibitions have been given
iff time after time in the old church building,
corner of Fifth street and Willow avenue,
I and Father Corrigan granted his consent
for their peformahee, and has occasionally
been present to witness them.
The Dramatic Association expects to
give an amateur theatrical entertainment
in the fall, the proceeds of which will be
devoted to the use of the hospital.
Company C’s Sociable.
Company C, Second Regiment, gave
one of the enjoyable monthly sociables
at the Armory last night. The attend
ance was large. Sale’s military band
furnished music for the dancing.
Among those who attended were Cap
tain McCulloch, Captain and Mrs.
Stone, Lieutenant Winterbotham, of
Seventh Regiment, N. Y.; Colonel
Rhynlander, Corporal Tournard, Ser
geant Schneider, Private and Mrs.
Sole, Private Saltonstall, Private
Scott, Private Angus, Pri
vate Muller, Private H. W. Mil
ler, Sergeant Van Zant, Private
Dunbacher, Private H. Miller, Jr.,
Sergeant Rabold, Lieutenant \V. \V.
Van Zant, Private John A. Bates, Cor
poral Joseph Bohnert, Quartermaster
g Sergeant Benson, Sergeant Stiles, Pri
I vate Alces, Private Keeler, Private
Kruse, Mrs. Stone, Miss Schneider,
i Mrs. Sole, Miss Kuhne, Mrs. Mueler,
H Miss Bagley, Miss Bohnert, Miss Rhyn
| lander, Miss Holstern, Miss Steinwehr,
Miss Daniels, Miss M. Daniels, Miss
I Muller, Miss Jackson, Miss Carrie
Stem, Miss Eva Stern and many
I others. _
Hoboken Briefs*
The Water Commissioners meet to
night.
The Jefferson Association met last
night at Gantzberg’s Hall. No busi
ness of importance was transacted.
The new ferryboat, Bergen, will go
Qn her trial trip on Saturday after
noon.
The Stevens Institute Glee and
Banjo Club will give a minstrel
performance at the German Clubhouse
on April 26.
A musical ana literary entertain
ment will be given by the Hoboken
Lawn Tennis Association, at Odd Fel
lows’ Hall, Monday, April 29. Miss
Dell Thompson, the elocutionist and
humorist, will recite in costume, and
| a number of other favorites have
promised their aid.
On next Sunday afternoon, concerts
| will be given at both Cronheim’s and
I Jacobs’ Theatres. They will be of a
: sacred nature.
The St. Matthew's Lutheran Sun
day school yesterday chartered the
Sirius, the largest of the Iron Steam
boat Company’s fleet for their excur
sion on June 12. *
“Rosedale,” Lester Wallack’s great
hit, was played at Jacobs’ Theatre last
night to a large house. Morgan and
Rice’s musical comedy, “My Aunt
Bridget,” will be on the boards to
night.
Some of the members of the Second
Regiment have been formed into an
Hospital Corps, and are kept contin
ually at ambulance drill, under the
command of Surgeon Kudlich.
Company C, of the Second Regi
ment, and Company A, of the Fourth,
will have another bowling competi
tion at Brown’s alleys, near the Court
House.
A battalion drill of Companies B,
| C and E will take place tonight.
Colonel Stevens will be in command.
The Seeond Regiment will have a
street parade on the evening of
April 3.
Policeman M. Walsh, who was
severely clubbed by roughs at an early
: hour yesterday morning, is still oh
| duty, although his face is badly dis
! figured.
The temperance society connected
with St. Joseph’s Roman Catholic
Church will give a dramatic enter
rnent after Lent.
g The St. Joseph’s Lyceum meet to
I night at the schoolrooms.
The Fourth Ward Young Men's
Independent Club will meet at Ren
ner’s Hall, Jackson street, tonight.
James O’Brien will make a strong
opponent against Councilman Stanton
for the Fourth ward Democratic nom
ination.
'- . I
FIRES AND FIREMExV. j
Sick Horses, House Alterations, Alarms
of tlie Month, Payroll.
All the members of the Board of
Fire Commissioners were present at
last night’s meeting, but no business
of especial importance was trans
acted.
Permission was granted A. T. Mc
Gill to raise two buildings, Nos. 415$
and 417 Monmouth street; J. 8. O’Con- ,
nor, to add another story to the build
ing No. 242 Newark avenue, and Bil- ;
lington Brothers, to alter the front of 'J
the building at the corner of First and
Coles street. i
Chief Farrier’s report showed there J
had been five fires and two bell alarms >
during the past week. }
Commissioner Henderson, of the s
Committee on Horses, reported two so
badly diseased that they had to be
. shot. The purchase of another was
’ ordered, the cost not to exceed $300.
The salaries of the members on pay
roll for the month of March will ■
amount to $5,818.16.
i -•”*
Occupations for Young Men.
At the next regular meeting of the
Young Men’s Literary Society, to be
held in the Y. M. C. A. parlor on Frl
day evening, Marshall W. VnnWinkle
will read an essay on “Victor Hugo.”
William M. Klink will also read an
essay. President William B. Baker
will introduce the subject, “Occupa
tions for Young Men,” for general dis
cussion.
NOT A BENEFIT TO THE SCHOOLS.
Tho County Superintendents’ Pay Bill
Has Been Uulned by ■•Amendments.”
The members of the State Teachers’ As
sociation are very angry at the way their
bill regulating the status of County Super
intendents of Schools hus been treated.
When it was reported to the Senate last
week by Senator Smith it was so changed
that its friends could not recognize it.
I called on a prominent member of the
association at his school this morning,
and I asked him what the general opinion
was regarding the bill.
“The State Teachers’ Association,” he
replied, “which has among Its members
many of the leading educators of the
State, being cognizant of the need of bet
ter supervision of the schools of the State,
has made several efforts during the last
two or three years to secure the desired
improvement.
EXPERIENCE NEEDED.
“At the last meeting of the association,
held in Trenton last December, a resolu
tion, among others tending to promote the
canse of education, was adopted. Here it
is,” and the gentleman showed me the
following:—
Resolved, Tnat it is tbe sense of this conven
tion that no one should be employed as City or
County Superintendent of Schools who has not
had at least three yearn' experience as a teacher,
and who is unable to pass an examination enti
tling him to secure, at least, a first grade county
certificate of qualifications.
,.1, -• .£ • a. J.1 _ till _
by the representatives of the Teachers’
Association,” the gentleman went on,
were:—To secure the services of men as
County Superintendents who have had
practical experience as teachers; to re
quire them to devote more time to the
duties of the office than the present in
cumbents can afford to give for the re
muneration received, and to pay them
salaries in proportion to tne services re
quired.
“In order that County Superintendents
should be capable of performing their
duties intelligently, they should have had,
at least, two or three years’ practical ex
perience as teachers. As it is part of their
duty to examine those who wish to teach,
they should possess the scholarship neces
sary to perform that duty. They should
be able to pass such an examination as
would entitle them to secure, at least, a
first grade county .certificate. It is rea
sonable to suppose that they should have
the necessary scholarship to pass an ex
amination in the subjects in which the
State law requires them to examine others.
PAY THEM WELL.
“Properly qualified County Superinten
dents should receive such compensation
for their sendees that they could give
their whole time to the duties of the office;
they should visit the schools under their
jurisdiction at least four times a year;
they should examine the schools not less
than once a year to determine their classi
fication and to note the progress made by
the pupils; and they should be capable of
offering such suggestions on improved
methods of instruction as would aid the
teachers and thereby benefit the pupils.
“The bill, as reported by Senator Smith,
shorn of its most important provisions, if
passed, will be of little benefit to the edu
cational interests of the State. It slightly
increases the compensation of the Super
intendents, but not sufficiently to enable
them to give the necessary time to the
work which the office entails; and it does
not require them to possess that profes
sional experience without which the
duties of the office can not be intelli
gently performed.
'‘The bill presented by the representa
tives of the Teachers' Association, before
It was deprived of its vital elements, had
real merits, and if passed would enable
the different counties to secure the
services of men of experience who could
devote more time to the duty of super
vising the schools of the State, thereby
contributing to the advancement of pub
lic education and rendering New Jersey’s
School law one of the most complete, if
not the most complete, in the United
States,
“It appears the bill as reported by Sen
ator Smith has passed its third reading in
the Senate. It is to be hoped that the
House will so amend it that it will em
brace tlie important provisions which
were left out Dy the Educational Com
mittee of the Senate.”
MOXICE.
City Clerk’s Office, )
City Hall, Bayonne, N. J„>
March 26th, 1889. )
Sealed Proposals
fVill be received by the Council of the City of
Bayonne until
TUESDAY, APRIL I6TH, 1889,
at S o’clock p. m.
•’or the sale to the City for its SINKING FUNDS
the following Bonds, viz.:—
$20,000.00 Tax Bonds and
$10,000.00 City of Bay
onne 20-Year Bonds.
The City reserves the right to reject any or all
iroposals.
By order of the Council,
W. C. HAMILTON,
__City Clerk.
BEECHES PILLS
A.CTV MAGrIO
ON A WEAR STOMACH.
2Scts. sx Box
OF ALL DRUCCISTS.
MRS. J. HABERT,
436 Grove Street, J. C.
New and Second Hand
FTJ^TSriXTJRE
SILVERWARE, STOVES AND RANGES
SOLD AND REPAIRED.
BRICKS AND GRATES FURNISHED AT
SHORTEST NOTICE.
4 N ORDINANCE FOR THE RELIEF OF WILLIAM
^ C. Newell iu const ruction of bay windows in
uikllug No. 215 Thirteenth street,
he Mayor and Aldermen of Jersey City do ordain as
follows:
Section 1. That William C. Newell shall be, and he
\ hereby granted permission to construct and main
ilu bay windows upon each floor of building owned
y him at No. 215 Thirteenth street, which windows
lay extend three (3) feet beyond the building line
f Thirteenth street, any ordinance to the contrary
otwlthstaudlnc; the wTork to be done under the
li per vision of the Inspector of Buildings.
Passed March 22,1883.
JOHN E. ECOTT.
City Clerk. R. S. JORDAN.
President,
pro tempore.
Approved March 27,1888.
ORESTES CLEVELAND,
Mayor.
JOSEPH DANA MILLER
Will speak on
THURSDAY EVENING, 23th Inst., at 8 P. M., at
COOPER’S HALL,
On the JUSTICE of the SINGLE TAX.
Admission Free.
CONCEDED!
While my neighbors
around me are announc
ing
THEIR PRICES,
I AM CONTINUALLY
“CUTTING”
my meat at the old stand
and at
“PRICES"
None Can Get Under.
THINK OF IT!
PORTERHOUSE STEAK
IQg. a Lb.
HUNT
C0TTA6E BUTCHER,
Railroad Crossing.
IOO Baby Carriages,
$2.00 TJ3PWA3RIX
A LARGE STOCK
-OF
Rugs, Lace Curtains,
Clocks,
Rogers’ .Silverware,
AND OTHER USEFUL
HOUSEHOLD ARTICLES,
FOR
CASH OR ON TIME.
Call and Exnwine Them*
GEORGE E. WATSON,
51 Montgomery St.
HIGHEST PRICE PAID!
OLD BOOKS MAGAZINES AND LIBRARIES
BOUGHT!
J3. Scarboro,
94 Montgomery St., J. C.
New books supplied at a liberal discount from pur
chasers’ prices. Call or send for bargain catalogue
of 'll! pages; free to all ou application.
GEORGE W. LAB AW,
ARCHITECT!
ROOMS tt AND WELDON BUILDING,
76 Montgomery Street.
PHAETONS, BUGGIES,
Surreys, Carts, Etc.
SHAFFER’S,
390 Palisade Ave, J. C. Heights.
Also, some Second-Hand ones on hand.
People’s Restaurant,
134 Montgomery Street.
CHAS. BUNGARD, PROP.
Meals ot all Hours.
The Cheapest in the City.
Table Board $3 per week. Regular Dinner, 20c.
WILFRED G. LAWRENCE,
UANUFACTURINO AND WHOLESALE
Confectioner,
No. 291 First Street,
JUNCTION NEWARK AVENUE.
Dealer In New and Second Hand Show Cases, Glass
Jars, Scales, etc.
BEST IX THE WOULD.
Its wearing qualities are unsurpassed, actually
outlasting two boxes ot any other brand. Hot
effected by heat. Sir GET THE CiEX L INE.
FOB SALE BY DEALERS GENERALLY.
For Sale
One Upright
Boiler and
Smokestack,
ONE VERTICAL FIVE
HORSE POWER
INGINE,
Belting, Shafting
►—and Piping.
Seven Compositors’ Stands
and Frames;
Fifty-Six Cases, a News
paper Dress of Brevier
and Nonpareil Type..
ALL IN GOOD ORDER.
Also, a good assortment of
Job Fonts
This is a rare oppor
tunity for a Weekly or
Country Newspaper to
secure a good outfit at
moderate cost.
Address,
f
The Jersey City Hews Co.,
HO, 80 MONTGOMERY ST„ JERSEY CITY.
C. M. CLERIHEW,
ERIE COAL YARD
Cor. Twelfth and Henderson Sts.
Telephone 248.
~~ DWYER’S ORCHESTRA.
Music Furnished for Picnics
Balls, Sociables, Etc.
BRASS BANDS A SPECIALTY
JVC,. 7 MUROM ST., J. C.
TTQS- K. nwyrii. header.
Try 91.00 ami 93.00 Ladles’ and Gents
Shoes, in all styles, as good as sold
elsewhere for 93.00 and 93.00.
ALL GOODS WARRANTED.
ID. Svi.lliira.xi,
MONTGOMERY STREET, near cor. Washington,
20 NEWARK AVENUE, and
228 NEWARK AVENUE, cor. Coles Street.
GO TO
Killen’s Restaurant
64 Montgomery Street,
WHERE YOU CAN GET
The Best Meal at the Lowest Price.
MOSER, PUSTER SON,
SCAVE NGE3RS.
OFFICES:
58 MONTGOMERY ST., 217 RALflOAD AVE
Privy Vaults, Kinks and Cesspools Emptied and
Disinfected, in all parts of Hudson County, prompt
and cheap.
DETECTIVES
Wanted in every county. Shrowd men to act under
instructions in our secret service. Experience not
nece»flnry,. The International Detective, the official
paper of theHurouu.eontaf neoxact likenesses of crim
inals wanted, and for whose capture large rewards
are offered. Bend £c. stamp for particulars. Address,
Qranntn Defective B ‘jreauCo.44 Arcade, Cincinnati, 0.
PEERLE8S DYES SutZmEmaMum I
HAIR i>RE88IKG.
' ' '&TJH33 CXJ3R3S f
Hammel’s Hair Balsam,
THE EXTRACT OF SAGE.
Is a sure cure for Dandruff and Scurf— a sure pre
ventative against the Falling and
Turning of the Hair.
Sure Cure for Baldness l
and tile Finest Ilair Dressing In the market
SOLD AT
J. HAMMEL’S,
15 Exchange Place (Taylor’s Hotel).
Mmb. IvIbairb
Importer, Designer and Manufacturer of all
kinds of
Human Hair Goods, j
LADIES' HAIR DRESSING,
SHAMPOOING AND HAIR CUTTING,
HAIR JEWELRY MADE TO ORDER. I
399 GROVE ST. AND 195 THIRD ST., J. C.
i
Wigs for Masquerades.
BUSINESS CARDS.
j. e. Wilber,
RESTAURANT AND DINING-ROOM.
TABLE BOARD. $8.30 PER WEEK.
356 Grove Street, Jersey City.
_Tables Reserved for Ladies.
H. & J. STELLING,
31 MONTGOMERY STREET.
(STELLING BUILDING.)
FINE WINE8 AND OLD WHI8KIE8,
Fine Ales, Best Brands of Imported and
Domestic Cigars.
Rochester Beer ou Draught and in Bottles
HENRY HAASE,
Practical Boot and Shoe Maker.
A $G SHOE, made to order, my specialty.
93 Montgomery St., J. C.
My own make constantly on hand.
Repairing promptly attended to.___
AUCTIONEER,
Justice of the Peace, Notary Public,
Commissioner of Deeds and
Heat Estate Agent,
Offiee, 237 Newark Av., J. C.
3P. 33. MitR.TITT,
Practical Sanitary Plumber
AND STEAM FITTER.
HEATERS AND RANGES A SPECIALTY.
189 Montgomery St., Jersey City.
CORPORATION NOTICES
^CORPORATION NOTICE.
Notice Is hereby given that the Commissioners of
Assessment will meet at their office, In the building
occupied by the* Board of Public Works, at the corner
of Mercer street aud Jersey avenue, Jersey City,
N. J., on Tuesday, the second day of April. 1889, at
ten o’clock a. nr., to appraise the value of the land
and real estate to be acquired for the construction
of a
MAIN SEWER.
beginning at a point on the easterly side of Garfield
avenue, at the intersection of the westerly side of
Richard street, thence running southerly along the
centre line of Richard street and the centre
line of Richard street produced to a point
about 330 feet south of the centre line of the Central
Railroad of New Jersey, thence southerly In a
straight line or course to lands under water In New
York Bay owned by the State of New Jersey, at a
point distant 25 feet east of the division line between
property owned by the heirs of Richard Vreeland
and the Morris & Cummings Dredging Company.
The lands to be taken for the construction or said
sewer King a strip of land 60 feet wide and about
1.900 feet long, of which the line above described is
the centre line. Said Commissioners will also ap
praise the damage which any owner of such real es
tate,or of any interest therein,may sustain by reason
of such improvement, and will then aud there hear
all i>artles interested in said improvement who de
sire to be heard before them on tnc value of the land
to be taken and the damage which any of the owners
of such lunds or of any Interest therein may sustain
by reason of such improvement.
W. W. RUGOLES, Chief Engineer.
Jersey City, N. J., March 22, 1889.
HERBERT STOUT.
CONRAD REICHENBECHER,
JAMES HUNT,
Commissioners of Assessment.
Jyj'OTICE TO CONTRACTORS.
Sealed proposals will be received by the Board of
Public works ou Monday morning, April 8,1889, at
ten o’clock, for the Improvement or
BEACON AVENUE,
from
OAKLAND AVENUE
PALISADE AVENUE,
in accordance with plans and specifications on Ale
in the office of the Chief Engineer, corner Jersey av
enue and Mercer street, where blank forms of bid
and agreement of sureties must be obtained.
Estimate of quantities:—
About 2.500 cubic yards earth excavation.
About 150 cubic yards rock excavation.
About 100 cubic yards earth Ailing.
About 1,000 cubic yards saud or gravel Alllug.
About 4,900 square yards stone puving.
About 500 lineal feet new curb stone.
About 800 square feet new bridge stone.
About 25 square yards repaving.
About 1.700 liueal feet reset euro stone.
About 50 square feet relald bridge stone.
About 1U0 square feet relaid flagging.
About 60 lineal feet cribbing.
Time for completion of contract, seventy (70) work
ing days.
No city official will be accepted as surety.
The making of the above Improvement and award
of the contract therefor will be subject to the remon
strance of the owners of the property liable to
more than one-half of the assessment therefor.
Proposals must be Inclosed In sealed envelopes,
endorsed:—“Proposals for improvement of Beacon
avenue, Oakland avenue and Palisade avenue,”
directed to the Board of Public Works, and handed
to the Clerk of the Board In open meeting when
called for in the order of business relating to sealed
proposals.
The Board reserves the right to reject any or all
bids If deemed for the best interest of the city so to
do.
By order of the Board of Public Works.
MARTIN F1NCK, Clerk.
J^otlCE TO CONTRACTORS.
Sealed proposals will be received by the Board of
Public Works on Monday morning, April
8th, 1889, at 10 o’clock, for the Construction of a
24 inch oval brick sewer lti Summit ave.
from Newark ave. to St. Paul's ave.. in ac
cortiance wilh plans and specifications on Ale in the
office of the Chief Engineer, corner of Jersey avenue
and Mercer street, where blauk forms of bid and
agreement of surety must be obtained.
Estimate of quantities :—
Ab#ut 860 liueal feet 21 inch oval brick sewer.
About 6 new receiving basins.
About 25 cubic yards concrete.
About 500 cubic yards of rock excavation.
Time for completion of contract, one hundred (100)
wnrlrlncr d:\iw
No city official will be accepted as surety.
The makiug or the above improvement and award
of the contract therefor will be subject to the remon
strance of the owners of the property liable to more
than one-half of the assessment therefor.
Proposals must be enclosed iu sealed envelopes,
endorsed " Proposals for building sewer in
Summit ave., St. Paul’s to Newark aves.,”
directed to the Board of Public Works, ana nauaed
to the Clerk of the Board iu open meeting, when
called for In the order of business relating to sealed
^lieltoard reserves the right to reject any aud all
bids if deemed for the best interest of the city so to
do.
By order of the Board or Public Works.
MARTIN FINCK, Clerk.
Dated Jersey City, March 20,1839.
■J^OTICE TO CONTRACTORS.
Sealed proposals will be received by the Board of
Works on Monday morning, April 1, 1839, at 10
o’clock, for the Improvement of
BALDWIN AVENUE,
from
NEWARK AVENUE
to
HIGH STREET,
in accordance w ith plans and specifications on file
in the office of the Chief Engineer, corner Jersey
avenue and Mercer street, where blank forms of bid
and agreement of sureties must he obtained.
Estimate of quantities:—
About 2,000 cubic yards of earth exoavatlon.
About 800 cubic yards of rock excavation.
About 500 cubic yards of earth filling.
About 1,600 cubic yards of sand or gravel filling.
About 5,000 square yards stone paving.
About 2,300 llucul feet of new curb stone.
About ?U0 square feet of new bridge stone.
About 25 square yards of repaving.
About 500 lineal feet of reset curb stone.
About 200 square feet of relaid bridge stone.
About 150 lineal feet of cribbing.
About 2 receiving basins.
About 100 lineal feet of 12-tuch vitrified pipe.
Time for completion of contract, one huudred and
fifty (150) w orking days.
The making of the above improvement and award
of the contract therefor will be subject to the re
monstrance of the owners of the property liable to
more than one half of the assessment therefor.
Proposals must be enclosed iu sealed envelopes,
endorsed "Proposals for Improvement of Baldwin
avenue,” directed to the Board of Public Works, aud
handed to the Clerk of the Board in opeu meeting,
w hen called for in the order of business relating to
seuled proposals.
No city official will be received as surety.
The Board reserves the right to reject a all
bids if deemed to the best interest of th so
to do.
By order of the Board of Public Works.
MARTIN FINCK, Clark.
Dated Jersey City, March 15,1S89.
A Rare Treat.
3333333 "THE £333333!
Sunday Morning News,
THE REGULAR
SUNDAY EDITION
OF THE
Jersey Coy News
N ow Appears in a N ew Shape.
EIGHT PAGES
Full of Spicy and Interesting Articles
by Special Writers from all
over the World
Price, Three Cents.
IT CONTAINS; |' |
All the Social Events of the City*. r
National, State and City Politica
Cable and Telegraph Dispatches,
State News by Special Correa
pondenta
Trenton Legislation Magnified
for the People.
Bill Nye’s Latest Agonies.
Good Stories by Well-Known
Authors.
Short Special Stories, Witty Par*
agraphs.
Religious News of Interest.
ORDER FROM YODR DEALlH
TO-DAY. I i
.v.sii'i'-i . IStsS-A'. i

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