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The Jersey City news. (Jersey City [N.J.]) 1889-1906, April 03, 1889, 5 O'CLOCK EDITION, Image 4

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do not affect the bill itself, and are merely
precautions to secure their city from its
operation.
Two hearings were given on the bill to
day. The citizens did not show any vio
lent desire to talk. One explanation was
that they had talked themselves out try
ing to get relief from former Legislatures.
Another was that most of them went
home when they discovered thatthemeet
ing of the Committee on Municipal Cor
porations set for noon could not be held
on account of the press of business in the
House. , .
Chairman Feeney’s dinner was so good
that the citizens who did want to talk
were growing impatient in the Assembly
Chamber when his well filled overcoat was
perceived coming down the aisle. He sat
down in the Speaker’s chair, toyed with
the gavel and announced that the commit
tee would first hear those opposed to the
bill.
AN OPPONENT FROM NEWARK.
Allan L. Bassett, president of the
Newark Board of Trade, took the first tilt
at the bill He has long, iron-gray hair, a
thick beard of the same tint and impres
sive eye glasses. He thought the
proposed form of government too autro
cratic and despotic, in view of the powers
conferred on the Mayor. The people, and
not the Mayor, should have the power.
Mr. Feeney observed that the Demo
cratic members from Essox seemed to
think it extremely improbable that the
charter would ever be submitted to a vote
of the people of Newark.
Mr. Bassett resumed that the Board of
Trade would -withdraw its objections if
provision were made for having the ques
tion decided at a special election or for
special ballots to be cast. He thought
that when such a question was
on the general ballot people voted
on it without thinking. Thus at the
election on the library question, only 300
votes were cast against it out of a total of
11,000. He further considered it advisable
to make some limitation, say eighteen
months, of the time in which the question
might be submitted to the people. If these
suggestions were attended to, Mr. Bassett
concluded, the Board of Trade would not
oppose the bill, because its members knew'
that Jersey City wanted it or something
it..
A further call by Mr. Feeney for volun
teers brought down the aisle a tall figure
with a red beard and red hair pointed sky
ward. The volunteer informed Mr. Feeney
that he was John H. Hopken, of Jersey
City. Mr. Feeney welcomed Mr. Hopken
warmly as being one of the few residents
of Jersey City whose acquaintance he had
not already made.
In a low, sweet voice, Mr. Hopken
uttered the opinion that when a city was
governed by a ring, the ring would deter
mine who should be the Mayor and who
would rule through him. Was there a
ring in Jersey City? Mr. Feeney inquired,
with an appearance of surprise. Oh, yes,
Mr. Hopken replied, there was a ring in
the Board of Works, one in the Fire Com
mission and one in the Police Commission.
“I wasn’t aware of any ring,” remarked
Mr. Feeney, after he had pinned down Mr.
Hopken to a declaiation of the existence
of rings.
“You must have been away from Jersey
City for a long time,” retorted Mr. Hop
ken. He said he had come to Trenton in
opposition to ring rule, and rather than
accept the proposed charter, he would
favor electing boards or establish
ing them in some other manner. Then
he and Mr. Feeney enjoyed a debate re
garding the effect on the Board of Educa
tion of giving absolute power of appoint
ment to the Mayor. Mr. Hopken thought
the tendency was not to elevate, and de
clared that it gave too much power to the
Mayor.
Mr. Feeney replied that the Mayors of
New York and Brooklyn had the same
powers as were sought to be given to the
Mayor of Jersey City and the citizens of
both towns were perfectly satisfied.
The supply of persons opposed to the
billhaving given out, Mr. Feeney called
for advocates of it. Big Jacob Ringel
stepped forward. He said that he
did not represent any one except
■ himself, but he felt it his duty to come to
Trenton to advocate the passage of the
bill. Jersey City was governed different
from any other municipality in the
country. One of the greatest evils was
that there was no head of the city govern
ment, no one on whom the re
sponsibility for dishonest or negligent
acts coulcl be placed. Since 1871 the citi
zens had tried year after year to get relief,
but the evil had continued to the detri
ment of the city’s interests. The streets
were not properly cared for and
everything except politics was neglected.
The proposed charter, he believed,
was not the very best that could
be offered; but it was an im
provement. Some citizens objected to the
power under the charter being placed in
the hands of the present Mayor; but Mr.
Ringel said he was willing to trust him.
In reply to questions by Mr. Voorhees,
Ringel said he would have preferred that
the first Mayor to exercise the absolute
power of appointment should be one
elected with that understanding; but he
was willing to trust the present Mayor.
THE NIGHT HEARING.
Not many citizens of either Jersey City
or Newark presented themselves ut the
hearing in the evening. Fagan and
Wiedenmayer were both absent. The
hearing was principally for the benefit of
Mr. Voorhees, to whom Messrs. Feeney
and Edwards explained the beauties of
the measure and its freedom from partisan
ship.
.Tftmoa M Miller fl Newark mn.miffl.et
urer of jewelry, asked that the bill be
amended so as to provide for a separate
ballot and for submission to the people
within eighteen months, if at all. The
feeling in Newark was decidedly opposed
to the bill unless such provisions were
contained in it.
Thomas Peer, of tho Jersey City Jour
nal, said he had felt very strongly for a
number of years that the government of
Jersey City needed reorganizing. At
present it was absolutely impossible to
place responsibility for anything. For
some time it had been impossible to do
anything in any Board without a “com
bine.”
“You mean there is a ring in every
board,” said Mr. Feeney.
"Yes,” he replied, and he continued that
both parties wrere represented in the rings.
The Mayors of Jersey City had been good
men and could be trusted to make suita
ble appointments if they knew they would
have to bear full responsibility. He was
in favor of single headed commissions.
Senator Edwards interrupted him to sav
that he had looked up the Citizens’
charter with a view to introducing it, but
had found it so imperfect and crude that
nothing could be done with it. He had
consulted cx-Governor Abbett about it
and found that it would have been neces
sary to re-enact ev erv section of the charter
of Jersey City, with the single-headed
commissions in view.
•PfWTTOlP AP APPIA1?
Mr. Deer usked if the member* of the
Police and Fire Department would be se
cure from removal under the new charter.
Senator Edwards and Mr. Feeney both de
clared that they were. Mr. Deer said that
some Jersey City Republicans were op
posed to the new charter because they
feared it would deprive them of their
offices.
Terence McDonald said that the citizens
of Jersey City, without regard for party,
clamored for a new charter. Citizens of
Newark need have no fear that the bill
would affect them. It would simply help
Jersey City to get out of a dilemma. He
asked that the section relating to the
police justices be stricken out. But he
urged that the bill be passed.
Mr. Feeney announced that the bill
would be amended so that the police
justices would not be legislated out of
office. The amendment will probably give
the appointment of police justices to the
Governor and provide that the incumbents
shall serve out their terms.
City Comptroller P. T. Quinn, of New
ark, opposed the bill on the ground that
political influence would govern the
appointment*.
Mr. Edwards then explained various
points of the charter to the committee.
He said that the terms of the various offi
cers were so arranged that, while the
present Mayor would nave all theappoint
ments, the next Mayor would be able to
entirely change the character of every
Board during nis term of office by making
new appointments on the expiration
of the terms of the first appointees.
He suggested that if Jersey City gave the
eighteen months limitation, Newark
should give way on the separate ballot
question. This seemed to be satisfactory.
He also suggested making a provision for
giving three days’ notice of the submis
sion of the question to a vote of
the people. Another change to be
made in the bill will provide
that, the election of Mayor and of Presi
dent of the Board of Aldermen shall take
place on alternate years. The Mayor and
the President will thus head their tickets.
It is believed that this will result in secur
ing better men for the second office than
if the holder were elected on the same
ticket as the Mayor.
SWINDLECATES WIN.
The Senators Refuse to Submit Newark’s
Water Bond Issue to the People.
[,Special to the Jersey City Neies.l
Trenton, April 2,1889.—That the Senate
is disposed to favor the projects of the
Water Swindlecates was shown this after
noon, when Mr. Edwards sought to have
a section added to the Newark Water
Bond bill, the effect of which would be to
let the people have a say before $6,000,000
of their money was turned over to a cor
poration.
The amendment provided that before
the proposed bond issue was made the
question should be submitted to a vote of
the people. In asking the Senate to in
corporate this proviso in the bill, Mr.
Edwards said that when the present Com
mon Council of Newark was elected
the question of issuing bonds for a
1 water supplv was not under considera
tion, and that body therefore in uo way
represented the popular desire on the
subject. For that reason it had no right
to puss on it. The people should have an
opportunity of saying whether or not they
would accept this additional burden of
taxation. Every house and every lot in
the city would De subjected to increased
taxes by the bill, and it was only right
that the question of increasing the bonded
indebtedness and taxes to the extent pro
posed should be submitted to the people.
Mr. Martin, the Senator from Newark,
said that he hoped that the amendment
would be lost, as he considered that the
present Common Council represented the
wishes of the people and was capable of
dealing with the subject ftiirly. The mat
ter had been under discussion for six years
and was thoroughly understood. It was
the only way Newark could get a pure
water supply.
1I1C tuucuuuicub mia luau vjj tv wi
to 14. Senator Smith voted with Mr. Ed
wards in the affirmative. Those wito
voted in the negative were Senators
Adrain, Baker, Carter, Cranmer, Hewitt,
Gardner, Mallon, Martin, Miller, Nevius,
Koe, Rue, Thompson and Werts.
The principle of the amendment pro
posed by Mr. Edwards is the principle of
the Feeney Anti-Swindlecate Water bill.
The Senate has apparently passed judg
ment on it and rejected it. It is true that
it has been represented that Newark was
thirsting for a water contract,
while Jersey City was not; but
the Senators could hardly be
expected to stultify themselves so far as
to reject one week the right of the people
to have a voice in so important a matter,
and to declare it the next week. Those
who wish to save Jersey City from a new
issue of water bonds, would do well to
think up some other plan than a bill from
the present Legislature requiring a vote of
the people.
A hearing was given on the Australian
Election bin. The speakers and the
speeches were those made to the Assem
bly Committee.
Mr. Baker introduced an act requiring
cable, electric and horse railroads to make
annual reports to the State Board of
Assessors, showing the amount of capital
stock issued, the amount paid in and the
amount of indebtedness.
Another bill introduced by the same
gentleman provides that a Secretary of
the Bureau of Labor Statistics and the
necessary assistants shall be appointed by
the Governor. The secretary is to hold
office for live years, and is to receive an
annual salary of $1,200. This is the office
wanted by J. P. O’Donnell. The appoint
ment is now made by the Governor and
Comptroller. The latter being a Repub
lican, it is difficult to find a candidate on
whom the two gentlemen can unite.
The Senate passed the bill whkh is
intended to enable the Jersey City Police
Board to retire Inspector Tom Edmondson
on half pay. It now goes to the Governor.
The bill protecting the Werts Excise law
from the consequences of a decision that
one of its sections is unconstitutional was
ordered to third reading.
William Y. Steel was nominated by the
Governor to be Prosecutor of Somerset.
NORTH HUDSON NEWS.
Jefferson’s Birthday Celebrated—A Sad
Story From. Union Hill.
The 146tli anniversary of the birth
of Thomas Jefferson, was appro
priately commemorated last evening
by the Jefferson Club, of West Hobo
ken, at Ruth’s Hall, Union Hill.
Though the audience was not as
large as had been expected, what it
lacked in numbers it made up in en
thusiasm.
After a baritone solo had been given
by Mr. Charles Kogge, and little Ger
tie Koch had recited, Edmund Koch
introduced Counsellor George L. Rec
ord, the speaker of the evening.
Mr. Record touched briefly on the
prominent features of Jefferson’s char
acter and drew a powerful contrast be
tween the times of the great Democrat
and the present. H is reference to the
labor question, and the growing snob
bishness of our aristocracy were loudly
applauded.
A vote of thanks rewarded Mr. Rec
ord for his speech.
A reception concluded the evening’s
entertainment.
In the audience were Collector Con
lin and Aldermen Nolan and Finne
gan, of West Hoboken, and Alderman
Merritt, of Union Hill.
The Jefferson Club will hold its
meetings every Friday evening, at
Hennig’s Hall, and strive by debat
ing the principles of Jefferson to
stimulate the Democratic spirit of
North Hudson.
A Mother's Grief.
In the early part of last February,
Mrs. Johns, of No. 23 Garden street,
Union Hill, had her seventeen-year
old-boy eoinmitted to Snake Hill as
an incorrigible character. The lad is
now dying, on the Hill, of typhoid
fever and the mother Is heartbroken
at her inability to get him taken
home.
North Hudson Notes.
The Weehawken Democrats will
nominate their local ticket next Sat
urday evening at Murray’s Hall.
Among the selections that will be
rendered by the Monastery choir at
their coming concert will be the “Hal
lelujah Chorus” from the “Messiah,”
and “Unfold, Ye Portals Everlasting,”
from Gounod’s “Redemption.”
The Democratic Nominating Com
mittees’ Sub Committee on Finance
met last evening in Dexheimer’s Hall,
West Hoboken.
The young Republicans of Union
Hill have elected William Hazzard,
Richard Sheldon, Louis Lindermann
and George Collmer to represent them
at the Conference Convention, at
WaaA Casino, next Saturday evening.
A DESPERATE JOCKEY.
The Chances McCarthy Took In Hts Ef
forts with fountain.
HORSES WORTH RACKING TOMOR
ROW-JERSEY CITY NEWS
SELECTIONS.
First Race—Bridget I Keaton,
Glenluco.
Second Race-Prodigal, Lottery.
Third Race-St. Elmo, Pat Daly.
Fourth Race-Addison, Mist.
Fifth Race—Tiburon, Now
Then. _
Those who saw Andy McCarthy’s ride
on Fountain yesterday declared they
had never before witnessed so desperate
an attempt of a jockey, and his praises
were sung loudly. In the first place he
jumped away like a flash at the post, and
although tiring badly at the finish, Me
Carthy pumped every bit oi speea out,
just securing the verdict.
A good day’s sport was enjoyed in spite
of threatening weather. The track was
lumpy and somewhat holding. There was
one little drawback to the sport, two
favorites being scratched at the last mo
ment in two of the races—Howerson for
the second and Speedwest for the third.
The first was scratched because the boy
sent to ride did not suit the judges, while
Speedwest’s owner could not secure a boy
at the proper weight.
There have been several disputes be
tween the bookmakers and betting public
of late, and the Executive Committee has
appointed John Tully, representing the
bookmakers, and Judge Burke, the racing
interest. These two gentlemen will choose
a third, and to that committee all future
betting disputes will be submitted.
The following are the results yester
day:—
f irst rtace—bix iunongs. rue larouw,
Retta, first by half a length; Addison sec
ond, three lengths in front of Hollowood.
Time, 1.23%. Mutuals paid 13.85; place,
82.70; Addison, $3.95.
Second Race—Suitor was the favorite
and won, the distance being seven fur
longs. Six lengths away was Jim Bradt,
second, and ten lengths in front of Pat
Oakley. Time, 1.37%. Mutuels paid
$4.40; place, $3.50. Jim Bradt paid $11.45.
Third race, at six and a half furlongs,
won by Artless, a 12 to 1 outsider. She
won easily by two lengths, Now Then
second, eight lengths in' front of Cap
stone. Time, 1.28%. Mutuels paid field
ticket $23.50, place $13.15, Now Then $16.65.
The fourth race, at seven furlongs, was
won by Fountain, second favorite, a des
perate finish iq which Andy McCarthy
showed a quick get off and a hard finish.
Mnzie was beaten a head, and Saluda
third, two lengths aTvay. Time, 1.35%.
Mutuels paid $10.45, place $4.70. Mazie
paid $6.90.
The fifth race was at six and a half fur
longs. Pendennis won handily, Velvet
second, Lomax third. Time, 1:28%. Land
seer was the favorite. Mutuels paid $12.85,
place $6.10. The field, $11.50.
The sixth race, also at seven furlongs,
was won by Parkville, a 10 to 1 outsider.
He captured it easily by three lengths,
with King B. second, two lengths in front
of Treasurer. Time, 1:37%. Mutuels paid
$29.10, place $7.10. King B. paid $3.60.
Tomorrow at Guttenberg.
(Special to the. Jersey City News.)
North Hudson Driving Park, April
3.—The following is the programme for
tomorrow’s sport:—
First Race—Five furlongs; purse $200; selling
allowances.
St.John.117 Telegraph.110
Krishna.112 Anita.110
Glenluco.110 Mamie B.110
Ida West.110 Bridget Keaton... 110
Woodstock.110 Horry Rose.110
Sarsfleld.110 Commotion..-. ...110
Second Race—Seven furlongs; purse $300.
Lbs. Lbs.
Lord Beaconsfleld... 120 Count Luna.117
Lottery.120 Killamey.117
Rebellion..120 Bassanio.117
Prodigal.120 Osceola.117
Third Race.—Six and a half furlongs; purse,
$200; selling allowances.
Lbs. | Lbs.
Carlow.119 King B.112
Velvet.112 Veto.112
Marshall A.112 St. Elmo.105
ComuB.112 Electrician.105
Alva.112 Petersberg.105
Vaulter.112 Weaver.105
Harry Brown .112 Pat Daly.105
Fourth Race.-Three-quarters of a mile; purse
$200.
Lbs. | Lbs.
Addison.117 l Laborer.106
Melwood.117 | Mist.101
Beecher.117 I Gold Vase filly.101
Hardship.114 j
Fifth Race—Seven furlongs; purse $200; sell
ing allowances:
Lbs. J Lbs.
St. Luke.1301 Mentor. 115
Johnnie E.121 j Roundsman.115
Hailstone .121 | Nita.113
Havana.118 j Tiburon. .110
Henrv B.115 Now Then.107
Tunis.115 j
Sporting notes.
Manager Powers and Manager Sharsig,
of the Athletics, have settled their dis
pute and the latter team and the Jersey
Citys will play at Oakland park June 38
and July 33.
The New Jersey Athletic Club’s base
ball team will begin operations by playing
the Stapletons, of Stapleton, S. I., on
April 13, on the club grounds at Bergen
Point.
The bowling teams of the New Jersey
Athletic Club and Newark Bay Boat
Club, of Bayonne, will roll a return game
this evening on the La Tourette House
alleys, Bergen Point.
The Jersey City Athletic Club announce
an athletic exhibition to be held at their
club house May 15.
The Greenville Lawn Tennis Club,
recently organized, have procured grounds
on Linden avenue, between Garfield and
Ocean avenues.
Clarence Murphy, of North Plainfield,
defeated R. W. Pope, of Elizabeth, in the
decisive game of the chess tournament
which began on Washington’s Birthday,
and in which many of the crack players
of the State took part, to decide the cham
pionship. The trophy has been held for
the past three years by R. B. Keys, of
Plainfield.
HThe Jersey Citys and the Princetons are
scheduled for next Saturday at Oakland
Park.
Bad Buck Steered the Horseshoe.
John Dueberry, a truck driver, stopped
to have one of his horses shod at Patrick
Liless’ blacksmith shop on Grand street
yesterday afternoon. Picking up one of
the old shoes he threw it out of the shop.
Mrs. Kips, of No. 134 Union street, was
pussing by and the shoe struck her vio
lently on the forehead. She went immedi
ately to the Third Precinct Police Station,
where her head was bandaged. Mrs. Kips
refused to make a charge against
Dueberry, who hud followed her, saying
that it was merely an accident. Dueberry,
who seemed very sorry about it, was dis
charged. __
The Boy Was Out Bate.
Michael Turner, a bright boy of twelve
years, was in Justice Stilsing’s court
this morning on a charge of va
grancy. Chanceman O’Brien picked the
boy up on Henderson street at four
o’clock this morning and took him to the
Grove street police station. Turner told
Justice Stilsing that he lived ulone with
his father in Hoboken.
His father ploys an accordeon on the
streets and he goes with him to collect
the money. He was out all last night
and was on his way home when
the policeman arrested him. He was
held in order that his case may be in
quired int-v
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REISLING WHITE WINE - $4.00 Doz.
GUTEDEL “ " * ■ ■ « $4.75 Doz.
TUMER & BEIMEL,
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23 & 25 NEWARK AVENUE, J. C.
AMUSEMENTS. ^
H .RJACOB^HOBOK E N THEATRE
Popular Prices. Sterling Attractions.
TONIGHT, LAST PERFORMANCE OF
“The Main Line.”,
THURSDAY, FRIDAY, SATURDAY AND SATUR
DAY MATINEE, BARTLEY CAMPBELL'S
“FATE”
Introducing the Celebrated Southern Beauty and
Emotional Actress,
MISS LEE LAMAR,
And & Company of Excellent Ability.
Sunday April 7, “KELLAR.” with his company,
in a Grand SACRED CONCERT and EXPOSE OF
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Academy. 25c„ soc.
CADEMY. 75c., $1.
Gilmore & Tompkins..Proprietors and Managers.
DENMAN <$>--4> DENMAN
THOMPSON. T THE QLp | THOMPSON.
T h—O—M—E—S—T—E—A—D. J
Wednesday' and Saturday Matinees. Seats ready
to April SO..
NIBLOU — 50c.
MR. E. G. GILMORE, I Reserved Seats.
Lessee and Manager. I Orchestra Circle.
Balcony.
Rudolph Aronson’s Company in
ERMINIE.
Wednesday Matinee at 2.
Grand opera house.
Take the Erie Ferry toot of Pavonia avenue.
Reserved Seats, Orchestra Circle and Balcony, 50c.
Wednesday Matinee. Saturday Matinee.
AXrs. Langtry
ARRIGAN’S PARK THEATRE.
EDWARD HARRIGAN.Proprietor
M. W. HANLEY.Manager
Mr. Edward Harrlgan’s McNooney’a Visit, revised
and rechristened,
4-1 1-44.
Dave Braham and his Popular Orchestra.
WEDNESDAY-MATINEE-SATURDAY.
TILE TURF.
HUDSON COUNTY RACING ASSOCIATION,
GUTTENBERG, N. J.
\ Every Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday. Take car
to Union Hill from Hoboken Ferry, direct to track
without change. First race at 1.30 o'clock. Admission
50 cents. Rain or Shine.
S. WHITEHEAD, Secretary.
LAWYERS.
rpHOMAS F. NOONAN, LAWYER. OPPOSITE
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Dairy Milk,
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MAPLE RIDGE DAIRY.
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BUSINESS CARDS.
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TABLE BOARD, $3.30 PER WEEK.
356 Grove Street, Jersey City.
Tables Reserved for Ladles.
MOSER, PUSTER SON,
Scavengers.
OFFICES:
58 MONTGOMERY ST., 21? R/.llflOAO AVE
Privy Vaults, Sinks and Cesspools Emptied and
Disinfected, In all parts of Hudson County, prompt
and cheap.
Daft Electric Light Co.,
115 BROADWAY, N. Y.
STATIONERY, ELECTRIC MOTORS, ELECTRIC RAILWAYS
AND POWER STATIONS, STORAGE BATTERIES.
GO TO
Killen’s Restaurant
64 Montgomery Street,
WHERE YOU CAN GET
The Best Meal at the Lowest Price.
Try SI.50 and §2.00 Ladies* and Gents
Shoes, in all styles, as good as sold
elsewhere for $2*00 and $3.00.
ALL GOODS WARRANTED.
ID. S villi vran,
MONTGOMERY STREET, near cor. Washington,
20 NEWARK AVENUE, and
228 NEWARK AVENUE, cor. Coles Street.
JOHN DUST,
—Dealer in—
Beef, Veal, Mutton,
f—-<$>
T LAMB AND PORK, POULTRY,
VEGETABLES, ETC.
0-0
263 Grand St., near Grove.
PETER T. DONNELLY,
PRACTICAL PLUMBER AND GAS FITTER,
Sanitary Plumbing a Specialty.
285 Washington Street, J, C.
Estimates Furnished. all Work Guaranteed
LIFE-LIKE PHOTOGRAPHS
BY
COSTELLO,
§88 Newark Avenue,
Opposite Court House, Jersey City.
GEORGE W. LAB AW,
ARCHITECT!
R00M3 98 AND 93 WELDON BUILDING,
76 Montgomery Street.
HIGHEST PRICE PAID I
OLD BOOKS MAGAZINES AND LIBRARIES
BOUGHTI
B. ScarTboro,
04 Montgomery St., J. C.
New books supplied at a liberal discount from pur
chasers’ prices. Call or send for bargain catalogue
of 76 pages; free to all on application.
PHAETONS, BUGGIES,
Surreys, Carts, Etc.
SHAFFER’S,
ayu ir'ansaae Ave., •». o. rreiyxita*.
j Also, some Second-Hand ones on hand.
DO YOU WANT TO KNOW WHERE YOU CAN
get
Fine Custom Shoes
made to order from choicest Brands of French Calf
cheaper than any other place i» this city? If you
do. call on
ikITTOXT SK&NTZE,
131 Montgomery St., Jersey City,
and he will convince you that having all the latest
Improved machinery, and making his own uppers,
he Is the man you are looking for. Machine or
hand-znado Shoos promptly repaired at Low Prices.
CASH OR CREDIT.
SPRING OPENING
OF j
Furniture, Carpets, Ac.
AT
MULLINS & CO.
1211423 Ntiuit lie., Jersc, Cit,. .
Owning the Property we Occupy,
AND HAVING
UNLIMITED CAPITAL,
We are determined to
Lead the Market, Sell Cheaper,
And Give Better Terms of Credit
THAN ANY OTHER HOUSE IN AMERICA.
All parties are respectfully invited to make us a visit of inspection, price
our goods in the various departments of our establishment, and they may rest
assured of being politely waited on, whether they purchase or not.
OUR STOCK CONSISTS OP
Furniture, Carpets, Oil Cloths, Matting, Bedding,
Stoves, Ranges, Baby Carriages, Refriger
ators, Lamps, Crockery, China,
Glassware, Clocks, etc.
The stock has been specially prepared for the Spring Trade. Every taste
can be gratified and every style found in profusion.
The Carpet Department/
contains an elegant assortment of Axminsters, Moquettes, Wiltons, Velvets,
Body Brussels, Tapestries of the latest styles and Choicest Patterns, with
Superb Borders to match.
Also a full line of Ingrain Carpets, Smyrna and Turkish Rugs, Linoleum,
etc.
CREDIT GIVEN at CASH PRICES.
1ULLIIS & CO,
Wm. Peter’s
Lager
Beer.
Palisade Brewery,
1 ONION HILL, N. J.
MRS. J. HABERT,
436 Grove Street, J. C.
New and Second Hand
FTJRisrrruRE
SILVERWARE, STOVES AND RANGES
SOLD AND REPAIRED.
BRICKS AND GRATES FURNISHED AT
L: Uf 1UT' L' VTT1 '■ L’
PLUMBERS.
' M. A: SHANAHAN,
Practical Plumber,
Sanitary Work a Specialty.
515 Grove Street, Jersey City.
All orders promptly attended to.
~m7 3P. MC03RAIT
Plumber and Gas Fitter,
553 Grove Street, J. C.
Estimates for all work cheerfully given and orders
promptly attended to.
Repairs for stoves and ranges furnished. Also
roofs, leaders, etc. made and repaired.
3?. 33. MARTIN,
Practical Sanitary Plumber
AND STEAM FITTER
HEATERS AND RANEES A SPECIALTY.
189 Montgomery St., Jersey City.
NOTICE TO CJREEITOM8.
Estate of albert w. cowan, deceased.
William H. Hallowell, administrator of Albert
W. Cowan, deceased, by order of the Surrogate of
Hudson County, dated March 7, 1889, hereby gives
notice to the creditors of said decedent to bring In
their debts, demands and claims against the estate
of said decedent, under oath or affirmation within
nine months from the date of said order, or they will
be forever barred of any action therefor against said
administrator. WILLIAM H. HALLOWELL.
ESTATE OF RICHARD DRISCOLL,Deceased.-Annie
Driscoll and Andrew Branuagan, executors of
Richard Driscoll, deceased, tty order of the Surro
gate of Hudson county, dated March 14,1889, hereby
gives notice to the creditors of said decedent to
bring in their debts, demands and claims against
the estate of said decedent, under oath or affirm
ation, within nine months from the date of said
order, or they will be forever barred of any action
therefor against said executor.
ANNIE DRISCOLL.
_ANDREW BKANNAQAN.
Notice of settlement.—notice is hereby
given that the account of the subscribers,
executors of James Reid, deceased, will be audited
and .stated by the Surrogate of the County of Hud
son, and reported for settlement on Saturday, the
18th day of May next.
Dated March 14, A. D. 1889.
ALFRED HENDERSON.
CHARLES HENDERSON.
Notice of settlement.—notice is hereby
given that the final account of the subscribers.
Administrators of Albert E. Edwards, deceased, will
be audited and stated by the Surrogate of the
County of Hudson, and reported for settlement on
Saturday, the 1st day of June next.
Dated March 27, A. D. 1889.
GRACE V. EDWARDS,
FRANK E. STULTS.
Notice of settlement.—notice is hereby
given that the flnaljaccount of the subscriber.
Administratrix of Mary McDermott, deceased, will
be audited and stated by the Surrogate of the
County of Hudson, and reported for settlement on
Saturday, the 1st day of J\me next.
Dated March 27. A. D. 1889.
CATHERINE HENRETTY.
City Clerk’s Office, 1
City Hall, Bayonne, N. J., >
March 26th, 1889. )
Sealed Proposals
Will be received by the Council of the Oily of
Bayonne until
TUESDAY, APRIL I6TH, 1889,
at 8 o'clock p. m.,
For the sale to the City for Its SINKING FUNDS
the following Bonds, vi*.:—
$20,000.00 Tax Bonds and
$10,000.00 Cify of Bay
onne 20-Year Bonds.
The City reserves the right to reject any or all
proposals.
By order of the Council,
W. C. HAMILTON,
City Clerk.
SEE THE ARTISTIC EFFECTS
WE PRODUCE WITH OUR
LOW PRICED GOODS.
H- C. FISK,
WALL PAPERS,
138 YORK STREET.
A LARGE STOCK
-OF
Rugs, Lace Curtains,
Clocks,
Rogers’ Silverware,
AND OTHER USUEFUE
HOUSEHOLD ARTICLES,
FOB
CASH OR ON TIME.
Call and Examine Them.
GEORGE E. WATSON,
'_51 Montgomery St.
People’s Restaurant,
134 Montgomery Street.
GHAS. BUNGARD, PROP.
Meal* ot all Hour*.
The Cheapest In the City.
Table Board $3 per week. Regular Pinner, 3uc.
C. M. CLERIHEW,
ERIE GOAL YARD
Cor. Twelfth and Henderson Sts.
Ieucs-bosk 343.

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