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The Jersey City news. (Jersey City [N.J.]) 1889-1906, April 13, 1889, 5 O'CLOCK EDITION, Image 2

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— THE —
Jersey CCittj JJcins.
JAMES LUBY, - - - Editor
PUBLISHED EVERT AFTERNOON
BY THE
JERSEY CITY NEWS COMPANY,
OFFICE, - No. 80 Montgomery Street,
(WELDON BUItDJKO.)
The Jersey City News: — Single copies, twe
cents; subscription, six dollars per year ; postage
free
The Sunday Morning News:—Published every
Sunday morning ; single copies, three cents ; sub
Boription. one dollar and fifty cents per year;
postage free. . „
Entered in the post office at Jersey City ns
second class mall matter. t _ _ .
All business communications should be aa
dressed to The Jersey City News Company ; all
others to the Managing Editor._
BRANCH OFFICES:
Advertisements, Subscriptions and Newsdealers’
Orders received: —
Hoboken—No. 2i Newark Street; C. H. Jackson.
Union Hill —H. Fischer, No. C2 Palisade A venuo.
Bergen Point—T. W. Dobson, opposite Railway
Depot. _
Bayonne — J. H. Brower. No. 481 Avenue D.
Five Corners—G. W. Fheiffer, No. 663 Newark
Avenue. _
SATURDAY, APRIL 18, 1889.
This paper is Democratic in, principles
and is independent in its views on all
local Questions.
THE
CIRCULATION
-OF THE —
THE JERSEY CITY NEWS
YESTERDAY
- WAS —
10,000 Copies.
THIS MEANS AT LEAST
50,000
REAPERS.
The Newspaper Trust.
It is no wonder that the news
dealers complain of the treatment
they receive at the hands of the
New York publishers. “ Maximum
labor, minimum profit” is the return
they receive from those papers whose
greatness they have largely con
tributed to make.
They carry hundreds of pounds of
paper which the publishers have
crowded into their Sunday editions,
not to develop circulation, not to in
struct or amuse the public, but simply
to make room for the columns and
columns of advertisements out of
which the enormous profits of the
papers spring.
—_<iA.nd now these papers increase their
, price to five cents—on account of the
vast cost of the paper they use, for
sooth. But what do they allow the
dealer for the labor of carrying that
paper? Heretofore he paid three cents
and sold his paper for four. Now he
has to pay four cents for the paper he
is to sell at five. ,
The New York dealers, of course,
are at the mercy of the trust to a great
extent. They must handle the paperg.
They have a monopoly to contend
with, and there is no escape for
them. But in Jersey City
there is a loophole of retreat
both for the dealers and the public.
For some three months past a paper
has been published in this commun
ity whose metropolitan tone and
whose enterprising presentation of
newB have commended it to
the public favor. The Sunday
Morning News, the regular
Sunday edition of the Jersey
City News lias made this region
wholly independent of the New
York papers. It has everything
in the way of news —cable, tele
graphic, and local—that they can
offer, and its special features are
equally attractive. It has besides
a large and attractive display of ad
vertising matter both from New York
and Jersey City business houses.
In fact, it combines all the ele
ments of a first-class modern journal.
We have nothing to complain of in
respect to the way in which the public
have responded to the efforts made by
the management of this paper; but in
the present crisis we recognize that we
assume new relations towards the
great body of newspaper readers. We
believe that thousands of persons will
resist on principle the new aggression
on their purses and patience and
■will give fresh support to the paper
that makes their interest its first
concern.
Tomorrow’s Sunday Morning
News will be the best paper we
have ever published.
The Palma Club can now settle
down to Its usual happy existence
again, for the election which has made
things hum is over. Two of the
“Splits” won the offices they wanted,
but the third—the candidate for cliair
J man of the Art Committee—was de
feated. ■ ■ .
The Jersey City News’ racing
selections in Thursday s issue sur
passed all contemporaries, sporting j
' . •
and otherwise. Singlestone, Golden
Reel, Chancellor and Juggler were
selected as winders and they got there
handsomely. Fodr out of five is a
good showing, and with a non-starter
in the first race the place selection ran
second. Three choices did not face
the starter, but the placing of Golden
Reel and Bill Bond exactly as they
finished in the third event shows judg
ment in horse matters.
Lawtek Fleming was quoted in
the Board of Finance yesterday as
having declared that “The new char
ter won’t hold water.” Is Mr. Fleming
quite sure on that point?
The Charter Contest.
Since a contest in the courts re
specting the validity of the new
Charter seems inevitable, careful pro
vision should be made for the conduct
of the public busines meanwhile. The
interests of the city must not suffer
because its servants cannot agree.
This is a very important season of the
year. Public improvements of all
kinds are to be initiated; the streets
are to be kept in order; some substi
tute for the refunding scheme which
Mayor Cleveland vetoed ought to be
devised.
To do all these things some one set
of officials should be placed in such
control of the public offices as will en
able them to act on urgent business
with security and despatch. Whether
the ad interim administration should
be the old or the new will, of course,
be a matter of dispute. The officials of
the old regime will plead possession;
those of the new will fall back upon
the popular vote. But surely there is
some legal expedient in the nature of
a temporary injunction which could
be speedily obtained, and which would
afford the city a modus vivendi until
the main questions are adjudicated.
The bill to place the whole matter
in the hands of the Supreme Court for
speedy adjudication, which ex-Gov
ernor Abbett and Mr. Allan L. Mc
Dermott have drafted, seems to meet
the needs of the situation. It provides
for a reasonable provisional settlement
and a speedy conclusion of the whole
matter. The Legislature should pass
it at once.
The Grabs and Their Misty Back
ground.
It is to be presumed that the latest
Gardner Railroad bill is intended to
accomplish the same purpose as it was
intended to effect by the original
Grab. This is the natural inference to
be drawn from the fact tjiat it comes
from the same source as its two prede
cessors, and was introduced after then
collapse.
If this view is correct, it throws
some light on the design sought to be
accomplished. Some railroad or rail
roads unknown want to condemn
lands to abolish grade crossings. All
right; that is a worthy project, but
what crossings? Senator Gardner
says that the word “hisrhway,” which
is alone used in the bill, would not
cover a street. Is it proposed to gobble
a street? In what city?
In the course of time, if Senator
Gardner will keep on introducing
these railroad bills, some light may
be thrown on these questions.
Mystery begets suspicion. It would
be much more expeditious for the rail
road companies to let some responsible
person—not a railroad senator—ex
plain exactly what is wanted. Then
the re quest could be considered, and, if
proper, granted.
But such vague and far reaching
powers as loom up in the shadowy re
cesses of these bills should not be
granted by the State. ,
AMUSEMENTS.
Ainberg’s Gesellschaft in Hoboken.
The people of Hoboken will have a
treat tomorrow (Sunday) night. Am
berg's Gesellschaft will appear at
Jacobs’ Theatre in Carl Laub's
schwank in four acts, entitled “Ein
toller Einfall.” It is the first appear
ance of the Gesellschaft in this place
for four years, and it is expected that
a huge audience will turn out to wel
come them.
Iloward Seely’s thrilling story, “ The
Wraith of the Chesapeake.” will be begun
in tomorrow’s SUNDAY MORNING
NEWS. Read, it,_
PERSONALS.
The friends of Levi A. Farr are soiTy that he
has to vacate the office of Town Clerk for West
Hoboken. He had filled it faithfully for five
years.
One of the men who take good care of them*
selves is ex-Sheriff Reinhardt, of West Hoboken.
He is getting fatter than ever.
The Rev. W. R. Jenvey, of St. Paul’s Church,
Hoboken, is an ex-army chaplain.
The Rev. G. C. Houghton, of Hoboken, is an ac
complished horseman.
Mr. Philip Hexamer has just recovered from a
severe cold contracted while giving an exhibition
of horsemanship at his Academy.
Alderman Salinger has challenged Prosecutor
Winfield to play a game of pinochle.
The handsomest lawyer in court yesterday was
Colonel Fuller.
judge Knapp wears a plain DiacK necxtie.
On Inaugural Day President Harrison will not
stop in this city long enough to view its beauti
ful streets, parks and public buildings.
Father Gillen, of St. Lucy’s, has been suffering
from an abscess in the left ear.
In a letter to a friend in this city, Mgr. Setone
of St. Joseph’s, wrote that he would not return to
this country until the latter part of September.
The Rev. Father Hanly is a good story teller.
Ex-Alderman Michael Reardon says that his
brother Dennis, who is also an ex-Alderman,
would have been elected had he worked a little
harder.
The Rev. D. R. Lowrie is considered one of the
best Presiding Elders in the Newark Conference.
The Rev. Father Boylan, of St. Michaels, is
fast recovering from his recent illness, and ex
pects to be out soon.
Otto Meyer says:—‘T vos done mit dat Bolice
Poard now.”
Eddie O'Donnell says:—*Tve knocked Meyer
out twice, and I guess he’s tired.”
The most familiar face at the Court House Is
that of “Pop” Cook, the septuagenarian.
Assistant prosecutor Noonan is the most sar
castic cross examiner who attends court.
Clerk Wiseman, of the Court of Sessions, is
always fashionably dressed.
IIow Some Jersey City
Women Spend. Their
Time Outdoors.
PANSIES ARE ALL TIIE GO.
Father Embarrassing to the Girl
Spring Blossoms -■ Interesting
to Women-Personals.
The Editor of the JERSEY CITY
HEWS presents his compliments to the
ladies of Jersey City, and respectfully
incites their co-operation in making
this column a feature of general inter
est and utility. Information and sug
gestions are earnestly solicited, and
assurance is given that all communi
cations will receive immediate and
careful attention, and will be regarded
as strictly confidential if the writers so
desire. _
Pansies ave in bloom and in different
parts of the eity 1 see many flower
beds filled with the pretty blossom.
These are the first flowers hardy
enough to bear the chilly spring
nights, and those who make a custom
of adorning their grounds with flowers
are now busy arranging the pansy
beds. Near the pansies I very often
find larger and more pretentious look
ing beds of tulips and hyacinths,
which are planted in the fall, and
whose tiny green shoots are the first
heralds of spring. These are tenderly
cared for and eagerly watched until
they bloom.
In Jersey City I think the prettiest
display of these small attempts at gar
dening is in the Bergen section of the
town, where the pretty cottages have
considerable ground about them.
I was walking through that vicinity
a few days ago, and noticed with
pleasure that in almost every door
yard were some attempts at gardening
in a small way.
PLATING AT GARDENING.
Indeed, I discovered that it had be
come quite a fancy of the ladies to
have a neat little patch of ground in
which they can dig, rake, hoe and
play at being gardener in a pretty
way. Sometimes the result is far
better than the friends of the fair
gardener anticipate, and a harvest of
blossoms will repay the anxious care
of many days. Even where a florist or
gardener is given the planting to do,
the ladies often superintend the ar
rangement of the beds and the selec
tion of the plants that are put in them.
Just now only pansies are to be
seen, and a pleasant rivalry is carried
on among the ladies who cultivate
them, in the way of producing the
prettiest shaped beds and greatest
variety of blossoms.
NO MORE PANSIES THEN.
In a few weeks there will be no more
modest pansies to brighten the gar
dens. They will be ruthlessly up
rooted and more conspicuous flowers
will replace them.
The English marigold, stock,
lobelia, heliotrope, and fuchsia are
among the most popular flowers this
season, and the bright blossoms make
a great variety of color when well
grouped.
MRS. YOUNG’S BEDS.
Some of the very prettiest flower
beds that I have yet seen are about
the handsome cottage of Mrs. E. F. C.
Young, on Glen wood avenue, and are
arranged entirely in accordance with
that lady’s idea and taste.
jjarge unis ux paxi^ics situiu xxi mmv
of the verandah, and other urns of
colas, carnations and heliotrope are
scattered about the grounds. At
present the tulips and hyacinths in
star shaped and oblong beds are in
full bloom, and the air about theplace
is filled with their fragrance.
Later in the season the plants are
changed many times, and only those
that bear flowers are kept. The cen
tres of the beds are always a mass of
gay colored blossoms, but the edges
are bordered with the deeper and
richer shades of colors and the sweet
and quiet mignonette.
It requires an artist’s eye to arrange
the many colors harmoniously, and
Mrs. Young exercises much skill and
exquisite taste in this respect.
IN OTHER PLACES.
There is generally a great similarity
in the arrangement of the flowers, and
the different shapes of the beds. Al
ways some few particular flowers will
be in fashion, and these will be seen
about nearly every house.
Mrs. English, of Sip avenue, is very
fond of beautifying her home in this
manner and has quantities of lovely
flowers in bloom all summer long.
The Misses Apgar and Misses Under
wood are among the few young ladies
who interest themselves in this
pleasant occupation %nd they meet
with flattering results.
Taken altogetner the gardening fad
is not very popular and but few are
really fond of it. Most women prefer
to leave that part of home decorations
to the taste of a gardener or to go
without it rather than to expose their
faces to the sun and wind in caring
for plants.
Bather Embarrassing to the Girl.
A young woman brought a ring to a
jeweller the other clay and requested
him to reset the stone, which she said
was loose. The jeweller took the ring
and said he would attend to it. As the
customer was leaving the store the
jeweller called her biick and said:—
“This stone is glass, ma’am—I want
you to understand that.”
The young woman colored up and
! exclaimed with wrath in her voice:—
“It’s no such thing—it’s a real dia
mond. Glass, indeed!”
“Excuse me, ma’am,” politely re
joined the jeweller. “It is nothing
more than a piece of common crystal
or glass. There is no doubt whatever
j about it.”
“But it was a present given to me
j last Christmas by a very deal- friend
| who wouldn’t think of giving me a
i sham diamond,” the young woman
I persisted.
| “I’m sorry, ma’ni,” replied the
jeweller, “somebody's been deceived
very likely, but this stone is absolutely
Worthless; a chip of glass.”
Well, the young woman argued still
further about the ring and insisted
that it was valuable, and at. last took
jt away with her, saying that she
j w-ould take it somewhere else to be re
paired. She was nearly in tears when
she left the store.
After she had gone the jeweller sa id
tome:—“I did not want to hurt that
girl’s feelings, but when a ring of that
kind is given to me to be repaired I
always make it a practice of having
it clearly understood that the stone is
valueless. If I did not I Should run
the risk of having the young woman
come back after she had discovered
that fhe stone was not a diamond, and
accuse me of changing it in the reset
ting. Such a charge was once made
against me under circumstances Of
tills kind, and since then I have fol
lowed a cautions policy for my own
protection. That girl was honest, I’ve
no doubt, but I cannot afford to take
any chances,”—Pittsburg Dispatch.
Spring Blossoms.
[M. S. B., in Judge.)
Now Is the time
Whnn poets rhyme
And editors go mad.
When bills are <Jue,
And Hats are new,
And vegetables bad.
’Tis now we note
« How vest and coat
Look strange and out of style.
Yet bravely say
They’ll last through May,
But know they can't the while.
Each youth and boy
Now whoops for joy
In idiotic mirth
While baseball nine
Their schiiines combine
To want, and get, the earth.
The painter man
With brush and can
Jostles us on the street;
We step in line
While hammers chime
And planks trip up our feet.
Oh, season drear,
We know you're here,
But don’t prolong your lease.
Don’t lounge about—
Get out, get out.
And let us have some peace I
Personals About Women.
Miss Emma Woodruff, who has been
ill for a long time, is much improved.
Mrs. Willis Jones, of Jersey avenue,
has taken a pleasant cottage in
Bergen.
At the fair held at Mrs. Sherwood’s
the flag decorations were artistically
done by Miss Margaret McKnight.
Miss Ada Somers is one of the most
popular vocalists in Lafayette.
Miss Mamie Kennedy, of Summit
avenue, is visiting friends in Haver
straw.
Miss Jessie Dickinson, of Bramhall
avenue, is entertaining friends from
Boston.
It is said there are more American
women studying art in Vienna and
Paris than ever before. A leading art
club in the former city has twenty-five
American lady students.
The New Orleans Woman's club is
said be the best governed ladies’ club
in the United States. It can at any
time bring half of the available wealth
of the town to assist in supporting
any project which it undertakes.
The finest single sapphire in this
country is owned by Mrs. William
Astor, and her necklace of emeralds
and diamonds is among the costliest
jewels in America.
At a Kansas wedding the other day
the bride’s father gave the happy
couple a check for $150. The urbane
bridegroom raised the check to $1,500,
and started off on a solitary wedding
tour. Another case of “where is my
wandering boy tonight.”
TRead “ 'the Wraith of the Chesapeake ”
in the SUN DA Y MORNING NE WS.
Mr. Lewis Lays Down the Law.
To the Editor of The Jersey City News:—
Permit me through the medium of your
paper to correct the impression that I am
in sympathy with the efforts of those per
sons who seem anxious to have the city
make a contract with private parties for
its water supply. Though my name has
been published in the list of those present
at times, I have not attended any of the
meetings and conferences ofjcitizens with
Mr. Bartlett.
These conferences do not commend
themselves to me. I am opposed to the
making of a contract with any syndicate
for a supply of water for the city. Jersey
City should possess and ever control its
own supply of water. With a view to the
needs of the cities of the State, the public
supply of water should, in my judgment,
be under State regulation, managed by a
State Board. Such regulation would
work equal justice to all cities. By it
there would be economy and safety to the
cities interested.
The “Committee of One Hundred” are
urging the passage of a hill now before
the Legislature to accomplish this object,
of placing the potable waters of the State
under the control of State authority, for
the use of the cities of the State. With
this proposed legislation I am in accord,
and while holding the views herein ex
pressed, X see nothing to be gained by the
conferences referred to. and no excuse for
running off after “strange gods.” Re
spectfully, etc., William A. Lewis.
JOSEPH WARREN’S BIG SALES.
Thousands of Hollars Worth of Real
Estate Transactions In Two Weeks.
The largest and most successful sales of
real estate ever effected in Jersey City
were the public sales made by Joseph
Warren, auctioneer, within the last two
weeks. They were as follows:~
House and lot, northeast corner of New
ark avenue and Erie street, property of
Alexander Hamilton, to Mr. Fischer, of
No. 109 Newark avenue, for $23,500; house
and two lots southeast corner of Jersey
avenue and Third street, property of M.
Lienau to Alderman Hoos, of the Ann of
Hoos & Schulz, furniture dealers, for
£13,000; chancery sale of estate of Patrick
Hayden, deceased, house and lot northeast
corner of Grove and Eleventh street,sold to
Mr. Klaus for $10,0d0; house and lot, No.
348 Eighth street, property of Joseph Sul
livan, to Mr. McManus, No. 299 Seventh
street, for $6,000; house and lot, No. All
Third street, property of M. Lienau, to
Ur. Loomis, for $5,500; house and lot, No.
297' Grove street, property of E. A. Mad
den, to Mollle Rnffel, of No. 835 Grove
street, for $5,000; executors’ sale of two
two-story and basement frame houses,
Nos. 369 and 371 Webster avenue, property
of Gilbert Combs, as executor, sold to
George Taylor, of No. 867 Webster ave
nue, for $4,900; house and lot, No. 321
Fifth street, property of Joseph
Mayer, to S. Goldberg, of No, 215
Newark avenue, for $4,825; house
^,.,1 1 .-»$• twt« ofrooi nmnflrt.v
of Bridget Egert to S. G. Warren, No. BV%
Bright street, for $4,000; lot and liouso, No.
61 Morris street, property of George B.
English, to Dr. Craven, for $4,000: two
lots, corner of Grove and Fifteenth streets,
property of Hayden Estate, to Mr. Con
nolly, of Grove street, for 43,800; house
and lot, No. 318 Fourth street, property of
Harriet L. Hill, to Mr. Schueler, of No.
3U4K Fifth street, for $8,675; No. 878 W eb
ster avenue, property of Gilbert Comps,
as executor, to Mrs. C. A. Brown, of Mt.
Vermont, N. Y., for *8,000; house and lot
No. 875 Webster avenue, gold to
A. Id. Haase, of No. 355 Sherman
avenue, for *3,550; house and lot,
No. 331 Fifth street, property of Mr.
Gray to Mi-. Kigge, grocer, corner of Mon
mouth and Fifth streets, for *3,325; house
and lot, No. 339 Fifteenth street, property
of Mr. Schmitt to James Breslin, of No.
335 Fourteenth street, for *3,015; .vacant
lots No. 313, 314 and 316 Sherman avenue,
sold to A. L. Haase, of No. 355 Sherman
avenue, for $1,875; vacant lot No. 188 Coles
street, property of Mr. Gletsteln to P.
Hayes, of No. 241 Twelfth street, for
$1,350; vacant lot, No. 353 Webster .avenue,
sold to M, K. Purvis, of No. 1637 Ninth
avenue, New York, for SSI 5; vacant lot,
No. 431 Netv York avenne, sold to Charles
Sutton, of No. 552 Ea3t 143d street. New
Ydrk, for $700, making a total of $101,730.
READ
HOWARD SEELY’S
THRILLING STORY
- OF THE -
--i '
“Tie Wraith
- OF THE -
— IN THE —
“SUNDAY MORNING NEWS,"
IT BEGINS
TOMORROW
William Delaney, Furnishing Undertaker, car
riages and camp chairs to let, 345 Grova street, Jer
sey City, N. J. Telephone call, No. 188.%*
DIED.
KEARNS-On Friday, April 12, 1889 Mrs, Ellen
Kearns, aged seventy-five years.
Funeral from the residence of her son-in-law
William McCarren, No. 280 Barrow street, on Monday,
April 15, 1889, at 9 o’clock a. m., thence to St. Mary’s
Church, where a solemn high mass of requiem will
be offered for the happy repose of her soul.
MORRISSEY-On Friday, April 12, 1889, Patrick Mor
rissey, beloved husband of Catharine Morrissey,
aged fifty three years.
Relatives and friends of the family are respect
fully requested to attend the funeral from his late
residence. No. Jersey avenue, on Sunday, April
14, 1889, at two o’clock p. m.
MCDONALD—Suddenly, on Saturday, April 18,
Michael J. McDonald, at his late residence, No.
63 Baldwin avenue.
Funeral will take place from the, above address,
on Monday April 15, at nine a. m., thence to St.
Joseph’s Church Baldwin avenue, where a solemn
mass of requiem will be offered for the happy re
pose of his soul. Court Jersey City, A. O. F., f*nd
employees of the Jersey City and Bergen Railroad
Company are respectfully invited to attend the
funeral.
WHEL AN—Margaret Whelan, Thursday, April 11, at
the residence of her uncle, John O'Brien, No. 691
Grand street, Jersey City.
Relatives and friends of the family are respect
fully invited to attend the funeral on Saturday, at
nine a. m„ thence to St. Patrick’s Church, where a
mass will be offered for the happy repose of her
soul. _
M. J. BOYLAN,
Funeral Director,
198 Pavonia Ave., Jersey City.
REAL ESTATET
¥. H. Lembeck & Co.,
£28 OCEAN AVENUE,
Near Danforth,
Beal Estate ill Insurance.
— OF —
EVERY DESCRIPTION
Sold, Leased or Rented.
Insurance placed in the most reliable company at
the lowest rates.
Money to Loan on Bond and Mortgage at 5 and 6
per cent.
We ask an Inspection of our For Sale List, having
some very desirable bargains to offer in improved
and vacant property.
XX)R HOUSES AND LOTS IN JERSEY CITY
X BERGEN, GREENVILLE, BAYONNE AND BER
GEN POINT, CALL OR WRITE TO
JOHN N. BRUNS,
Ho. 137 Ocean Avenne, Jersey City.
Ho. 77 DanfortJi Avenne, Greenville.
SEND FOR LIST OF CITY AND COUNTRY PROP
EBTV.
Houses to I*et.
Houses to let on the heights.
House, 0 Rooms, $13; impts. Near Marion street.
House, 8 rooms, $!•; impts.
Hovsf, 9 rooms, all impts.; $2n.
House, 10 rooms, all impts,; $25.
Part, 5 robnis, all impts.; $15.
Part, 5 rooms, all impts., $10, $12.
J. J. GAFFNEY, Tonnele aye.,
Marlon Station.
Flats to Let.
TO LET-A FLAT OF SEVEN BOOMS, ALL 1M
provements, by May 1; 818.00. 150 Ocean avenue,
Jersey City Heights.
Lease for Sale.
TOR SALE-IEASE AND FIXTURES OF AN OLD
F established corner liquor store. For particulars
apply to P. Rodgers. No, We Newark avenue, corner
Gertiiaula avenue, Jersey City,_
Stores To Lot.
A BARE BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY—TO LET,
the old established paper hanging, oil cloth and
carpet store. Apply at No. 383 Hudson street, New
YPrk.___
Floors To Let.
IX) LET.—SECOND FLOOR, NO. 28» MONTGOMERY
1 street. Private house, hot and cold water.
BOARD WANTED.
TENANTED—BOARD IN A QUIET, PRIVATE PAM
XX jsi Bfi ftfidiai*
“Doiesiic” king Micle
Company’s
Free High Art Exhibition,
NOW OPEN AX
133 Newark Ave., Jersey City.
and Will Continue
Wednesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday,
April 9, IO, I I, 12and 13,
ALL ABE WELCOME.
OLD GOLD11 SIL
VER BOUGHT.
HIGHEST CASH PRICES PAID.
Gold and S Iver Refinery,
77 and 79 Varick. near Canal street.
I" BE£CHAM’S PILLS
ACT LIKE MAGIC
OH A WEAK STOMACH.
SSOts. a Box
Ofr ALL PRUOCI8TS. __
HENRY F. EARNING,
Carriage, Wagon and Pictorial Sign Painter.
155 Pavonia Avenne, J. C.
New Carriages; also, Second, hand Wagons and
Carriages bought, sold or exchanged.
Express Wagons Painted at the lowest rates.
HEMt Y HAASJ2,
Practical Boot and Shoe Maker.
A $6 SHOE, made to order, my specialty.
93 Montgomery St., J. C.
My own make constantly on hand.
Repairing promptly attended to.
■ 1 " * t .na». iwi'u—mmmrn—a
HAIR DRESSING.
A STJ3R3E CTJKlET
Hammel’s Hair Balsam,
THE EXTRACT OF SAGE.
Is & sure cure for Dandruff and Scurf — a sure pre
ventative against the Falling and
Turning of the Hair.
Sure Cure for Baldness!
and the Finest Hair Dressing In the market.
SOLD AT
J. HAMMEL'S,
15 Exchange Place (Taylor’s Hotel).
JOHN DUST, *
-Dealer In
Beef, Veal, Mutton,
<$,-:---<S>
T LAMB AND PORK, POULTRY,
VEGETABLES, ETC.
G--O
263 Grand St., near Grove.
WM. H. MILLER,
KlorisTT,
LATE OF THE JERSEY CITY FLORAL DEPOT,
335 Barrow street, near Newark Arane,
ARTISTIC FLORAL DESIGNS.
Handsome Funeral Work a specialty. All kinds-of
seeds and plants. The choicest of Flowers at mod
er^^^rices^Fresl^loivvej^^aiij^>|>B^B(BBBii>|iB|(|iB|BB(B>
Try 81.50 and 83.00 Ladles* and Gents
Shoes, in all styles, as good as sold
elsewhere for 83.00 and 83.00.
ALL GOODS WARRANTED.
T>. Smlli^raxi,
MONTGOMERY STREET, near cor, Washington,
JO NEWARK AVENOE, and
2J8 NEWARK AVENUE, cor. Coles Street.
J. E. W/ABEIt,
RESTAURANT AND DINING-ROOM.
TABLE BOARD, SS.'iU PER WEEK.
356 Grove Street, Jersey City.
Tables Reserved for Ladies.
FOR SALE.
SMALLGitOfSRlClHhK AND'cANDy' STORE
jTl In a good neighborhood; price, SJJO; rent low;
(not an every day cliance). Address Wilfred Law
rence, Wholesale Confectioner, 201 1st st„ J. C. _
FOR SALE-UPRIGHT BOILER AND ENGINE.
. Shafting and Belting. Condition, hrst-elaas
Address. W. M. F., Jkrsey City News office, No. 8)
.—
FURNISHED ROOMS.
rpO LET—A FRONT ROOM, FURNISHED; FOR
X one or two; terms moderate. No. 151 Pavonia
ave., second floor. _ ._
l?URNISHED ROOMS TO LET, WITH OR WITH
JF out Board. No. 214 Railroad Avenue. _
SITUATION WANTEdT
A BOY, FIFTEEN YEARS OLD, WANTS A SITU
ation to help lii a greenhouse or on a farm.
Wages uo object. Address FRANCIS, No. S4? varlck
street, Jersey City.
BY A YOUNU MAN, TWENTY-NINE, MARRIED,
situation. Capable of doing anything. Regular
business clothing salesman. Address,
Jersey City News Office.
Female.
Respectable woman wants situation, as
dishwasher in hotel or restaurant. Address No.
159 Steuben street, in rear._
X>espectable woman Wants situation to
I\ go out by the day to wash or house cleau. No.
Steuben street, in rear.______
anted-a situation as good plain coqk,
' ▼ washer and ironer; no objection to the
country. Apply 138 Montgomery street, top floor.
WOMAN WISHES A SITUATION AS A GOOD
Washer and Ironer, will work by the day or
week. No. 248 Railroad avenue.
“ ANTED-WORK BY THE DAY. PLEASE
call or write to No. 22 Railroad ave., Jersey
HELP WANTED.
Female.
WANTED-TWO GIRLS FOR GENERAL HOUSE
work; must be good cooks and laundresses;
references required. Call No. 16 Hudson street,
Hoboken._
ave., Jersey City. _
Wf ANTED—TWO INTELLIGENT YOUNG LADIES
I* of good address to go to Providence. R. I.; em
ployment light, respectable and profitable; all ex
penses advanced; references required. Address
E. O. M., Jersey City Newp office.__
W~ ANTED—OPERATOR ON AWNINGS; ONE AC
cuatomed to the Domestic machine. 26 and 28
Gregory st., Jersey City. _ _
JbA W XMK8.
T^HOM^^Ti^^A^^]^LAWYER. opposite
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN.-PURSUANT TO
A the provisions of an art of ihe Legislature of
the State of New Jersey, entitled, “Anact to author
i/.e persons to change their names,” approved Feb
ruary twenty-fourth, in the year eighteen hundred
and seventy-six, notiee is hereby given that I Shall
apply to tne Circuit Court of the county of Hudson,
at the Court House, in Jersey Otty, in the State of
New Jersey, on Saturday, the eighteenth day of May
next, at ten o’clock Jiu the forenoon, or as spou
thereafter os I cr.n be, heard. Tor an order to apthor
ge me to assume another name, to Wit, the name of
leaner B. Gifford. ^
NELLIE B. GIFFORD,
Geo& Gifford,
No. *7 Bergen aven»l J?r«ey ofty, N. 1.
Dated April Dtp, W.
SHERIFF’S SALE. ._
(SHERIFF'S SALE-IN CHANCERY OF NEW
1 Between TheFnlrmontMutualBuilding^ndLun”
Association, complainant, and Marks Myersod, et
ux., et als., defendants.
Fi. fa., for sale of mortgaged premises.
Returnable May TerimA.!)., IhW.
Randolph, Conflict A felack, Solicitors. .
By virtue of the above stated writ tp TOP directed
ami delivered, I shall sell by public vendue atP.
Wolbert’s llenl Estate and Auction Rooms, No. 47
Montgomery Street, Jersey Citv. on
THURSDAY, the Twenty-tilth day of April,
n.t two o'clock in the afternoon, all the following
described0 land and Pr<‘»>fewith the appurtem
ances, being the same described in said writ, that is
'°Ainhat certain lot. piece or parcel of land and
premises, situate, lying and being In the City of
Tersev City, in the County of Hudson and State of
New Jersey, and which on a map, entitled **niap
property at MonticeUo and Coldeu. Town of Bergen.
Hudson County, N. J., made by G. R. Van Horn, civil
SSr'k Known and designated » part dt
tot® nin^v seven (97). and the whole of lot (99) In
bllmk lettered K, fronting on Gardner avenue, and
mnv hr* described as follows, vl*:—
Beginning at a point on the northerly Une of Gard
ut-ra venue, distant seyeflty-flve feet easterly from
the easterly line of Mouticello avenue; theuce run
nlng northerly, parallel with MonticeUo avenue one
hundred and thirteen feet and one and a quarter
Inches <113. l«l to a point seventy-five <7S) feet east
erly from the easterly line of flont cello avenue;
thlvnpp easterly, at right angles to MonticeUo avenue,
twenty-nine feet and one and one-half inches (29.1^);
thence southerly, parallel with Mouticello avenue
six (6) feet; thence easterly, parallel with Gardner
avenue eleven feet and six Inches (11. 6); thence
Suitherlv at right angles to Gardner avenue one
hundred^and nine feet and seven inches (109. i), to
the northerly line of Gardner avenue; thence west
erly1^ a long said last mentioned line thirty feet
(W to the point or place of beginning.
1 It being imderstood said dimensions and measure
ments are to be for more or less, as the q&se may be.
Dated March 16, 1839. R0BEBT DAVIS. Sheriff.
SHERIFF’S SALE —IN CHANCERY OF NEVF
1FRSEY
Between Garret E. Wfnants, complainant, and
William C. Traphagen and Caroline R., his wife,
et als., defendants.
FI, fa., for sale of mortgaged premises.
Returnable May Term, 18®.
Luther S. Elmer, Solicitor. , ,
Bv virtue of the above stated writ to me directed
anti delivered, I shall sell by public vendue at F. O.
Wolbert’s Real Estate and Auction Rooms, No. 47
SSX?;THE ELEV ENTI-P AYOV APRIL, A.D.
1899, at twb o’clofek in the afternoon,
all the following described land and premises with
the appurtenances, being the same described in said
V’\u that certadn 'lot, piece or parcel of land and
nremlses together with the four-stor.v brick house
thereon erected, situate, lying and being In Jersey
City Hudson County, State of New jersey, and
which, on a map of Jersey City made by R. C. Bacon
Civil Engineer and Surveyor, A.It. 18S1, Is known and
designated as parts of lots twenty-eight (28) and
twenty-nine (29), block two hundred, and seventeen
(217) and more particularly described as follows:
Beginning at a point on the southerly side of Tenth
street, distant one hundred and seventy-eight,(178)
feet seven and one-half Inches (7«) easterly from,
the southeasterly corner of -drove and Tenth streets,
and from thence "running southerly parallel with
drove street to, through and beyoml a party walk
standing partly on the promises hereby conveyed
, Yi.fnovt w m n no uuetsHv
thereto one hundred ; id)) feet, thence easterly aha
uarallel with Tenth street Uventy-slx (26) feet four
and a quarter (4«j Inches; thence northerly and
uarallel with the line first run to, through and beyond
a narty wall standing partly on the premises hereby
conveyed, and partly on the premises next adjolm
jjjtj easterly thereto one hundred (100) feet to the
southerly side of Tenth street; thence westerly and
along the southerly side of Tenth street twenty-Six
(26) feet four and oue-unarter (4J4) inches to the
point or place of beginning.
.Secondly.—Also, all that other certain lot, piece or
parcel of land and premises, with the four-story brlek
dwelling house thereon erected, situate, lying and
being in Jersey City aforesaid, and which, on the
aforesaid map of Jersey City, made by R. C. Bacot,
A. D., 1364, is known and designated a» part of lot
fifteen (45), in block one hundred and eighty-two
(182), and more particularly described aa follows :
Beginning at a point on the northerly side of Ninth
street, distant one hundred and forty (140) feet east
erly from the northeasterly corner of said Ninth and
Henderson streets, and from thence running north
erly and parallel with Henderson street to, tlirough
and bevoud a party wall, standing partly on the
premises hereby conveyed, and partly on the prem
ises next adjoining, westerly thereto one hundred
(100) feet; thence easterly and parallel with Ninth
street twenty (20) feet ; thence southerly and par
allel with the line first run to, through and beyond
a party wall, standing partly on the premises hereby
conveyed, and partly on the premises next adjoin
ing, easterly thereto one hundred (100) feet to the
northerly side of Ninth street, thence westerly and
along the northerly side of Ninth street twenty (20)
feet to the point or place of beginning.
Dated March 2d, im
__ROBERT DAVIS. Sheriff.
SHERIFF’S SALE. IN CHANCERY OF NEW
JERSEY.
Between Garret E. Winants, complainant, and
Henry Traphagen and Annie M., his wife, defend
ants.
FI. fa., for sale of mortgaged premises.
Returnable May Term. 1889.
Luther S. Elmer, solicitor.
By virtue of the above stated writ, tome directed
ana delivered, I shall sell by public vendue at F. G.
Wolbert’s Real Estate and Auction Rooms, No. 47
Montgomery street, Jersey City, on
Thursday, the Second Day of May, A. D,, 1889,
at two o’clock in the afternoon, all the following
described land and premises, with the appurte
nances, being the same described In said writ, that
is to say:—
All mvJIWJ IICI wuu lUiia, UWW) I'J I/UIUCI? ui utuu auu
premises, together with the three brick buildings
thereon erected, situate, lying and being In. Jersey
City, in the County of Hudson and State of New
jersey, and more particularly described as fol
lows:— V
Beginning at a point on the southerly side of
Tenth street, distant one hundred (IpU) feet easterly
from the southeasterly corner of said Tenth and
Grove streets, and from thence running southerly
and parallel with Grove street to, through and
beyond a party wall, standing partly on the. prem
ises hereby conveyed, and partly on the premises
next adjoining, easterly thereto one hundred (MW)
feet to the southerly side of Tenth street; thence
westerly along the southerly side of Tenth street
seventy-eight (78) feet, seven and one-half i7&)
inches; thence northerly and parallel with Grove
street to, through and beyond a party wall, standing
partly on the premises hereby conveyed, and partly
on the premises next adjoining, easterly thereto one
hundred (lOp) feet to the southerly side of Tenth
street; thence westerly and along the southerly sid®
of Tenth street seventy-eight(i8) feet, seven and one
half (7}4) inches to the point or place or beglnuiug.
Bclnga part of the premises conveyed to the said
Henry Traphagen by Phebe A. Watson and husband,
ana William C. Traphagen and wife, by deed dated
December l6fh, A. D. 1884, and recorded In Liber 898
of Deeds, page 429. etc.
Dated March 28d, 1889.
ROBERT DAVIS,
_Sheriff.
SHEKli* *»AUE>-1JN UnAft Can x Ur MEW
jersey.
Between Garret E. Win ants, complainant, and
William C. Traphagen and Caroline R„ his Wife, and
Harry Traphagen, administrator. See., of H. M. Trap
hagen, dec., defendants.
Fi. fa., for sale of mortgaged premises.
Returnable May Term, A. !>., 1889.
Luther S. Elmer, solicitor.
By virtue of the above stated writ to me directed
and. delivered, I shall sell by public vendue at P. G.
Wolbert’s Reiil Estate and Auction Rooms, No. 47
Montgomery street. Jersey City, on
THURSDAY, the eleventh day of April, A. D„ 1889.
at two o clock In the afternoon, all the following
described land and premises with the appurte
nances, being the same described in said writ, that
is to say :
All those two certaiu lots, pieces or 'parcel*
of land and premises, situate, lying and being
in Jersey City, In the County of Hudson, and
State of New Jersey, and which upon the
official map of Jersey City, made by R. C.
Raeot, City surveyor, A. D., 1861, are known and de
signated as lots oue (1) and two (2) on block two
hundred and thirteen (213), and may be described as
follows:
Beginning at the southwesterly corner of Hender
son and Seventh streets, from thende running west
erly along the southerly line of Seventh,street oiie
hundred and one feet, eleven and 6he-elghth inches
(101 ft, 111-8 In.); thence southerly and parallel With
Hendersou street (or nearly so) fifty feet three and
five-eighth inches (50 ft. 35-8 In.); thence easterly Slid
parallel, or nearly so with Seveuth street, one hun
dred and one feet eleven and one-half inches (101 ft.
111-2 in.) to the westerly side of Henderson street*
thence northerly along Henderson street fifty feet
and seven inches (GO ft. 7 in.) to the point or place o*
beginning.
Dated March 2, 1989.
SHSEYFF S SALE_IN CHAyCERY of new jer
Betwieen Elisabeth A. Bramball, complainant, and
William Ely Uramhall et al„ defendants u
Fi fa,, for sale of mortgaged prwntaes.
Returnable February Term, 1889.
Collins and Corbin, solicitors.
By virtue of the above stated writ to me directed
anil delivered, I shall sell By public vendue at P ft
Wolberfs Real Estate an^Auctlon Roomsf No «
Montgomery street, Jersey City, on '
THURSDAY, the Ninth day uf Mny, A. D. 1889,
at two o clock In the afternoon, all the following de
scribed laud and premises with the appurtenances!
being the same described In said writ, that Is to
All the following described lots, pieces or parcels
of land and premises, situate, lying and hiS,/»
Jersey city, In the ISitm/y of ’hSou Sil smfe 3
New Jersey, which ore known and distinguished on
r w^-Lft0P£rt£b^DE,'ag ,0 E' A- BrmSl a3d
, . ureenvllle, Jersey cttv, N, J. ■* made
by J. )) -Soper & co., civil engineers awl surveyors
July, IKS, as lots numbered, twiitv three*S5
twenty-four (34), twenty-five (35), twenty3t iff
twenty-seven (37), twenty-eight (28) twenty- nh, Ss!’
tl*.1y,'ty.<?0>> ‘h'fty-one (31), thirty-two (Sfthlrtv three
(33), thirty-four (34), tbtrty-tlv-e (85), tfdrtvsfxisP?
thirty-seven (37), thirty-eight (38), thlrty-ntim «1
fwty (41)), forty-one (11), forty-two (lj), Amy tlwe£
(43), forty-four (44), forty-five (45), fortwslx oni rAS„
seven (47), forty-eight W forty-nine <«>. nlhSpAsi)
0>1), mty-two ({hi), fifty-three (88) * fiftv tnnr
(54), flfty-flve (55l, fifty-six (5tj), flftyaeveii cwr epre?
eight (Si), fifty-nine (59), sixty '
«JaW;‘wo (63), sixty-three (l«), slxty-fmm(64| llitl:
«? .©y'uinte,
Dated Starch SOtS, 1J89.
--______ tua\ ia, «nerni.
S*»S SALE--N®W JERSEY SUPRllHg
&S&8*ct al Ts'0eorge Handel
H, fa., fte.
Returnable June Term, 1589.
E. B. Seymour, Attorney.
By virtue of the above stated writ to me directed
aain eBveretl I have levied upon and shall sell bv
Aubtton Room*1 tee °A WolbS?s^R«1 Eslate ‘a£5
CRyfou" ' N6' 4‘ Montgomery Btreet, Jereey
THURSDAY, the sixteenth day of May next,
aU^“toie'^the'a^v? Mnmd’ tMemlant'*^*108
Handel, In and tonH theraMowmr^“lledTJS
and premises, with the appum^auS tK i?“to
AH certain lot of land and premises BitnatA
ai^pndaifee^S^h SS? “d *" ®S
Robert davis, suwa.

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