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The Jersey City news. (Jersey City [N.J.]) 1889-1906, June 07, 1889, LAST EDITION, Image 2

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— THE —
Jersey OPity JXews.
JAMES LOBY, - - • EDrroR.
PUBLISHED EVERY AFTERNOON
BY TUB
JERSEY CITY NEWS COMPANY,
OFFICE* . No. 80 Montgomery Street.
(WELDON BUILDING.)
The Jersey City News: —Single copies, (wo
cents; subscription, sis dollars per year; postage
The Sunday Morning News : — Published every
Sunday morning ; single copies, three cents ;. sub
■cription^ one dollar and nfty cents pei year,
^nteredTii the post office at Jersey City as
Second class mail matter.
All business communications should be ad
dressed to The Jersey City News Company ; all
others to the Managing Editor.
BRANCH OFFICES!
Advertisements, Subscriptions and Newsdealers'
Orders received: —
Hoboken — No. 21 Newark Street; C. H. Jackson.
Union Hill —H. Fischer, No. 62 Palisade Avenue.
Bergen Point —T. W. Dobson, opposite Railway
Dei rot.
Bayonne — J. H. Brower, No. 4S1 Avenue D.
i ;VE Corners—G. W. Phelffer, No. 663 Newark
Avenue.
FRIDAY, JUNE T. 1883.
Mr. WESTBROOK’S
IEHERITASCE,
A HIGHLY ENTERTAINING KOVELETTE
Will Be a Leading Fea
ture of the Coming
Issue of the
(ORDER IT IN ADVANCE FROM \
TOUR DEALER.
This paper is Democratic in principles
and is independent In its views on all
local questions.
We Are Not Afraid of Fisk.
The Trenton Times says:—
The democratic papers that used to put In a
great deal of time puffing General Fisk are now
jumping on him with both feet.
He has made them angry by declaring that he
will no longer help to place democrats in power
In this State.
Not at all. We have never puffed
General Fisk; neither do we propose
to abuse him now.
The General is a gentleman of high
principle and irreproachable personal
character. The fact that he is a bad
politician is, as times go, rather
honorable to him than otherwise. He
has not made us one bit mad in the
world. He has put us, and all good
democrats upon the alert, His early
announcement of his political position
has made plain the dangers that
threaten us in the next campaign.
To be forewarned is to be forearmed,
and our republican foes will find that
when the time comes we shall so array
ourselves for the combat that “the
churches, the Sunday schools, and the
temperance societies” will not be
arrayed against us.
Our only competitor was guilty of
the meanness yesterday of stealing an
idea from the advertisement on Wed
nesday of our lawn tennis feature pub
lished yesterday. This is the second
time the same thing has happened.
Our only competitor is old enough to
know that ideas are property in the
eyes of the moral law, and, that it
earns for itself contempt and con
demnation when it appropriates those
of other people.
Giving to the Poor.
Now see how easy it is to do a good
thing when you only set about it.
The Rev. Mr. Moffat and his excel
lent flock have set an example to the
churches of Hudson county of which
they may well be proud, and which
■we trust the other churches will hasten
to emulate. The Rev. Mr. Moffat is
generous, too, in acknowledging that
he drew his inspiration from the col
umns of this paner.
Since the few days ago that the Jersey City
paper commenced its strong caampiouship of the
poor,” said Mr. MoRat, "we have collected over
$700 among the small congregations of our smal1
churches. We hope to have three times the
amount before another week, and will conclude
arrangements for one or other of the places wo
are negotiating for.
The only way to do a good thing is
to go ahead and do it. That is evi
dently the leading principle of Mr.
Moffat’s work, and it is the only prin
ciple of action which always prevails.
Now, if in the Hoboken churches,
■which Mr. Moffat himself speaks of as
small, seven hundred dollars can be
raised iu a few days, and three times
that sum can be promised, what could
some of our rich churches do if they
only tried?
It would only take $250 to send 1,200
mothers and babes from Gammon -
town and our other reeking tenement
districts, away out to sea for twelve
hours. Such a cruise would be good
for the salvation of a hundred lives, at
least. Then let us all wake up and
make a trial for early July. It is so
easy, and if we once taste the sweets
of doing good, we will not easily sur
render the privilege.
Owr Prohibitionist Friends.
At the meeting of the State Central
Committee of the Prohibition party
at Trenton on Tuesday, a res
olution was adopted, recommend
ing that all intelligence regarding the
party be forwarded to Thk Jersey
City News. This is a recognition of
honesty, liberality and enterprise
which we appreciate.
Our friends of the Prohibition party
Jcnow well that we are not with them
j iii their extreme opinions. But they
recognize that we respect their hon
esty and purity of motive, and that
we would not misrepresent them on
j any consideration.
In our judgment, the Prohibition
j party represents a good idea, carried
[ much too far. But we believe that it
has done and may in the future do
much good, as a force to create whole
some discussion, and as a menace to
wicked politicians.
VVe are much complimented by the
kindness of the committeemen, and
we hope in the future to continue to
enjoy the goodwill of themselves and
their followers.
If any one‘in this State doubted the
falsity of Republican reform pretences,
he must have had the scales rudely
torn from his eyes by the unceremoni
ous removal of Postmaster Kelly to
make room fora republican politician.
We have not a word to say against
Mr. Dickinson; but we have no words
too strong to use in denunciation of
the disgraceful course of the Federal
Administration towards deserving
Democratic office holders.
Some New Jersey Enterprises.
The great variety of the enterprises
which have their home in New Jer
sey is strikingly shown in the schedule
of miscellaneous taxes just sent by
the State Board of Assessors to the
Comptroller that the taxes for 1889
may be collected. In it are numbered
corporations whose object on this
j sphere is to lighten the hours of hu
manity, relieve its sufferings and
smooth its path in directions not gen
erally suspected.
Who, for instance, would expect to
find “Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show”
on the list? There it is, all the same,
and the Hon. Colonel Cody pays out
of his hard earned money the sum of
$12 annually to the State of New Jer
sey, presumably in return for protec
tion from the cruel nobility of Europe,
whom he entertains.
New Jersev also assists in trving to
navigate the air, to the extent of im
posing a tax of $1,000 on a company
which proposes to build an air ship.
It is also the legal home of big pro
ducers of glucose, cotton seed oil and
other astonishing transformations.
New Jersey has the company which
runs the Broadway horse cars. Dozens
of corporations which are developing
the South conduct operations here, so
far as paying taxes on capital stock is
concerned, although no one connected
with them may ever have tasted
applejack, except, perhaps, one of the
lawyers. A steamboat line between
New York and Albany is known as
the New Jersey Steamboat Company,
and contributes $2,000 a year to New
Jersey’s coffers. John H. Starin, the
eminent New York republican, pre"
fers to pay his transportation com
pany’s taxes to New Jersey instead of
to the Empire State.
These corporations were formed in
this State, of caurse, because their
projectors preferred the New Jersey
corporation law; but they are the
means of adding many thousands of
dollars to the revenue of the State.
AMUSEMENTS.
“Daddy Nolan” at Jacobs’.
Daniel Sully’s new play of “Daddy
Nolan” was presented to a crowded house
at Jacobs’ Hoboken Theatre yesterday.
The audience seemed to expect an unusu
ally good entertainment, and judging
from the laughter and frequent applause
they were not disappointed.
The play is a good one, uud of that char
acter that will draw and please the masses
very much. There is one characteristic
that is well worth mentioning, and that is
the natural and every-day appearance that
everything about the piece has. There is
nothing strained, nothing dramatic, ap
parently, yet everything is intensely dra
matic in reality. This peculiarity, more
than any other one thing, has to do with
the success of the play. The entire comedy
is intended as a picture of honest but
lowly life in New York. The genuine wit
and humor of the dialogue and characters
and situations, and the homely pathos aud
brightness of the actors, make the charm
of the play.
In the last act there were some special
ties that were loudly applauded. Mr.
Sully’s songs were all well received, and
Mr. Arnold’s dancing brought the house
down. The last act was a very pretty
little bit of stage setting, showing the
East River, Brooklyn Bridge and New
York as seen from Brooklyn Heights.
Saturday’s matinee performance is for
the benefit of the Johnstown sufferers.
PERSONALS.
Mr. E. F. C. Young received an unexpected
visitor at the First National Bank yesterday
morning. His visitor, strange to say. sought en.
trance to the bank from the street window. A
loan was requested, but, as it did not conform
with the State banking laws, it was denied. Mr
Young's visitor was a monkey. At the other en.
of the string was an importunate Italian,
Leon Abbett, Jr., is an enthusiastic yachtsman
and his sloop yacht, the “Emily B.,” is a mode
of seaworthiness. With several well known
members of the Jersey City Yacht Club. Mr.
Abbett proposes, some time next month, to go on
a cruise which may extend as far as Martha's
Vineyard.
Mr. Philip M. Brett is spending a few days In
New Brunswick.
Dr. Cornelius Brett, pastor of the Bergen Ke.
formed Church, is in the Catskills for a day or
two.
The wedding of Miss PhlUis Eirich, daughter
of the Eev. P. Eirich, pastor of the German
Lutheran Church, to Mr. Frank Werner, of
Zanesville. Ohio, will be celebrated at No. 11
Eighth street, June 18.
Edwards Brothers have secured the contract
for the new Jersey City Electric Light Building
on the Mills property, at the foot of the Hill.
McIntyre Lost Bis Clotli.
Matilda Higgins, who said she had no
home, was committed for trial this morn
ing by Justice Stilsing for larceny. H.
F. McIntyre, of No. 201 York street,
suys he made her acquaintance last even
ing and that she stole a piece of cloth for
a suit of clothes from him.
11 * 11 ■ "•
Jorsey City Lodge.
A regular communication of Jersey
City Lodge No. 74, F. and A. M., will be
held this evening to work the M. M. de
gree. A full attendance is desired.
Members of sister lodges will be cor
dially welcomed. This is by order of
Joseph F. Moore, W. M., ana Isaac M.
Clark, secretary.
A WEDDING IN EGYPT.
FLASHING JEWELS 31 A KE A SCENE
Fit031 THE AHABIAX NIGHTS.
All the I. a dies Smoked Cigarettes mid
Stared at the Bride — Dancing Girls
with Tambourines and Castanets —
Wedding Customs.
A writer in The Christian at Work
thus describes a marriage ceremony in
Egypt: —
We were ushered into a large square
hall, paved with marble; a fountain
played in the centre, sending up a
spray of perfumed water. All around
the wall ran a low cushioned divan,
while female slaves in thin white
Oriental dresses were standing about
the room to render any service that
might be needed. Up a wide stone
staircase we went, into an upper hall
just like the lower, and also filled with
serving girls, who bowed and salaamed
as we passed through, putting their
hands on their hearts in token of sub
mission. There is no distinction of
color, for some were fairer than we—
Georgians they were—while others
were black as charcoal, but all mingle
together.
GLITTERING JEWELS.
We were escorted next into a large
room filled with elegantly dressed
ladies, some in thin native dress, which,
if they would only believe it, is so
much 'more graceful and better suited
to them than the bright bodices and
liigli-heeled shoes than which we have
never known aught else, and to which
they are learning to accustom them
selves. Such an array of Hashing
jewels, diamonds, rubies, emeralds and
pearls I have never seen, as on their
fingers, necks, heads and ’arms. It is
a perpetual Arabian Nights entertain
ment.
As soon as we were seated, a scamla,
one of the pretty octagonal tables of
polished wood, inlaid with mother-of
pearl, was brought in and set before
us. Upon it was a gilt ash receiver,
and a girl brought us a basket of
cigarettes and a case of wax matches.
When we declined they looked
amazed, every’ lady in the room but
the bride was puffing the smoke from
• . i • mi_ it._
ucbwccu lid iuav xiyo.
brought us coffee in the tiny ftngans,
which are the curiously shaped cups
of the East. The coffee has a peculiar
but not unpleasant taste, and one
soon becomes fond of it; at least, I did.
In one corner of the room were a
dozen dancing girls—Almehs they call
them—who shook their tambourines
and castanets over their heads, and
crooned a wild melody, to which they
kept time with rhythmic motion. The
fanciful dress, the jewelled arms of the
girls and the tinkle of the silver bells
on those instruments made up a
pretty picture. A little negro boy
as high as my knee and as black as
the ace of spades, dressed in red satin
and gold, danced about the room to
make merriment for the guests.
THE BRIDE ON A THRONE.
In the centre, on a throne-like dais,
sat tiie little bride, whose years could
not have numbered more than twelve.
She was dressed in white satin, with a
front of gold lace; the train of gauze,
heavily embroidered with gold, was
so long that it covered the three steps
of the throne.
Her illusion veil was pinned with a
diamond aigrette, but it was evidently
an aching brow that bore the diamond
coronet, for the poor child had been
sitting there for three whole days to
be looked at, and looked as if she
would like to lay all the splendor
down for a little repose.
The marriage usually takes place at
the house of the husband, but this
was an only child, and she was al
lowed to stay at home for a while.
The bridegroom had not seen her un
til the third day of the marriage
festivities; then the ladies all retired,
while he came in for a moment, and
was allowed to salute his child-bride,
and immediately retired, but at mid
night he was to come and the mar
riage proper would be celebrated.
Iu Royal Splendor.
From the Washington Star.
Here is a description of a suite of
rooms occupied by a girl of nine. Her
name I will not give, for it would be
• unkind to pillory a child for the sins
of her parents. She has a beautiful
little sitting room in white and gold.
The walls are hung in rose tinted
silks, and special pieces of furniture,
diminutive in size, and including a
small secretary in ormolu with Sevres
plaque, that slie may carry on her little
correspondence. Here are toys, the
elegant gifts she receives, and here she
entertains her friends.
in satiu wood, her brass bed hung with
blue silk curtains. A dressing room
attaches, and in this is the culmina
tion of luxury. The dressing room is
quite large. The marble bath is set
against tne wall. The low marble
basin is supplied with perfumed soaps.
Sponges of all sorts and sizes hang in
racks. Perfumed waters in cut glass
bottles, cold creams, delicate lotions
all find a place. On her bureau are
laid out expensive brushes and combs
in repousse silver and exquisite toilet
bottles and manicure cases in pearl.
In one comer is placed a long cheval
glass that, she may contemplate her
skirts and dainty footgear. The im
propriety of calling this child’s atten
tion so specifically to the care of her
body is already manifest; one can only
wonder what there can be in reserve
for her when she is grown.
Nursery Hygiene.
From the New York Sun.
The room selected for a day nursery
should have a southwest exposure.
The third floor of a house, especially
if there be an attic above it, is prefer
able to the two lower floors. It is
drier, more easily heated, less noisy,
and less cut off from sunlight. The
night nursery should, if possible, com
municate with the day nursery,
though this is less important than
proximity to the parents' sleeping
room. Neither apartment should ad
join a bath room having sewer con
nections. A lofty ceiling is far from
desirable in a nursery; on the other
hand, the room ought not to be less
than eight feet high. It is better to
use a candle or night light than to
burn gas in a r%ht nursery. The
room should not be carpeted, and the
walls should be painted with a view to
being washed and thoroughly disin
fected in case of the occurrence of con
tagious disease. It is essential to have
a separate bed for the nurse and one
for each child.
Note. About Women.
M<ss Annie Woodward, of Tonnele ave
nue, is visiting friends in Easton, Pa.
Mrs. Sarvent, of Cole street, will spend
j a portion of this month in New Haven.
1 The ladies of the First Baptist Church,
, have postponed their strawberry festiva
1 to June 11.
Mrs. William Brown, of Erie street
and her daughter, Mrs. William Hush
have -returned from a pleasant trip t<
i Nyack.
Mrs. J. E. Dodd, of Montgomery street
is entertaining friends from Trenton.
: FREEHOLDERS GET BIDS
| VHICES AT WHICH COUNTY SUV
V LI ICS MAY liE OBTAINED.
Apropos of Tea, Mr. Nelson Asks tin
Members of the •'Combine” to Try tc
Recover Their Tost Reputat-ious
Register Fielder Does Not Yield.
The Board of Chosen Freeholders mei
j in the court room yesterday, and immedi
ately resolved to listen to the reading ol
, bids. Messrs. Smith and Turner wert
! appointed as the two tellers. Then Su
periutendent Gannon said that with Mr
, Turner teller there would be no jobs; just
| then Mr. Turner withdrew and asked tc
■ have Mr. Nelson serve. Mr. Nelson said
! no, but as a favor to the Director lie
agreed to serve. The bids were as fol
lows:—
Peter J. Donahue, per ton for ice for
Jail and Court House.• ••$ 4 60
J M. C. Reynolds, lumber as per specifi
cations. 15 80
: Thomas O’Connor, provisions for
county institutions..— 128 00
; James Soden, leather and shoestrings. 25 55
i George Blakey, coffee and spices. 885 00
“ •* vegetables. 1,500 00
: Oakdale Manufacturing Co., A 1 butter
ine, per pound . .. „ „
, Richard Tighe, shoes. 1,692 60
Edwin Okie, butter, per pound. 15^
| Fletschmanu compressed 3’east, per
pound. 35
Samuel C. Smith, shoes. 1,704 09
James C. Hall, lime and cement. 857 50
S. H. Brown, agent for C. Brown, fresh
meat. 888 00
Henry H. Hawkins, lime and cement.. 866 00
.. lumber. 1,518 00
John Hart, milk, 3%c. per quart. 18 22
“ “ eggs, 22c. per dozen. 55 00
Henry Byrne„vegetables. 1,055 00
Knobland & Co., paints and oils. 217 09
“ ** hardware. 1,196 15
Wiggins & Abel, hardware— . 1,9*5 10
“ “ paints and oils. 216 75
Jacob Christman, vegetables. 1,100 00
John J. Lenehan, vegetables. 1,195 00
Wiggins & Abel, wooden ware. 68 10
ntwy umtuu:, uuu-ri, puuuu.
Dennis Sheridan, egg a, 21e. per doz.... 51 50
William R. Cooke, coffee and spices.... 306 00
“ “ butter, per pound... 17%
“ “ fresh meats. 744 00
“ “ tobacco. 120 60
“ “ provisions. 90 20
•* “ groceries (not esti
mated) . ...
Dodge & Co., lumber....,. 1,489 00
Doscker & Co., soap and starch. 129 50
T. Carroll, ice for Snake Hill... 4 50
Edward Dunn, ice for Snake Hill. 3 45
Thomas F. Kenney, ice for Snake Hill.. 3 50
Frank McDermott, ice for Snake Hill.. 5 00
O. Lawrence, clothiug. 345 00
Meyer Bros., tobacco. 144 00
Janies Soden, shoes. 1,687 40
John G. Mars, tea, per pound. 21c.
and 1294c..
Hart & Co., butter, per pound. 38%
C. Witkamp, compressed yeast, per
pound. 35
J. G. Mars, coffee and spices. 372 50
“ “ wooden ware. 47 00
Wood& Menagli, hardware. 1,162 93
Jo.m Troll, shoes.1,719 00
F. & C. Shober, fresh meat. 744 00
Joseph E. Vincent, dry goods. 1,299 50
“ “ “ notions. 211 20
“ “ “ hosiery. 501 80
Edward McDermott, ice for County
Jail, per ton. 4 00
Michael Smith, fresh meat. 693 00
D. Ueardou, milk. 1,788 75
Wood & Menagh, paints and oil. 217 66
Charles E. Ahrens, groceries. 1,382 20
“ “ “ flour. 4,185 00
“ “ 4* crude oil, per gal... 15
44 44 44 eggs, per doz, 22c.. 55 00
44 44 44 butter, per pound... 17
44 44 44 coffee and spices... 297 00
44 44 44 teas, per pound, 27c.
and 23c.
44 44 44 soap and starch- 126 00
44 44 44 wooden ware. 58 50
44 “ 44 provisions. 107 80
J. W. Coyle, coal, per ton. 4 75
Abraham Post, fish..-. 265 (X)
E. A. Gerdy, leather. 19 50
Then, having read a telegram from
Counsel McGrath announcing the victory
for the County Road in the Supreme
Court, the Board adopted a resolution
thanking Mr. McGrath.
Then Clerk Boyd read a communication
from Register Fielder, claiming that he
did not need to attach an affidavit to his
requisitions, and having attached a requi
sition for a desk, some envelopes, some
blue pencils, etc.
This referred to the rumpus between
the Register and the Board a short time
ago, when he refused to sw’ear that he
needed some supplies for which he signed
a requisition.
The Hudson County Staats-ZeitunQ
wanted to be an official paper, and the
matter was referred to Griffin, Smith and
Tierney.
Right on top of this came a lot ot
claims. Among these was one of Register
Fielder for indexing. It amounted to be
tween seven and eight hundred dollars,
and there was an affidavit attached, say
ing that the work had been done.
A communication was received from
Director Steger saying to the Freeholders
that the wardens could not be held re
sponsible for anything unless they have
some authority, and that the committees
and individual members ought not to be
allowed to interfere with the wardens.
He also said that it w^as outrageous that
the great amount of supplies exceeding
the amount needed was received, and told
the Board that he would see that the ex
cess went back.
Mr. Nelson then begged the “combine”
to look into several of the abuses, notably
the matter of tea, the contract having
called for seventy-five chests and the con
tractor having supplied 250 chests.
He said that he, of course, not being a
member or me compine, mui very little
to say in tile actions of the Board, but he
wanted to have the members of the "com
bine” tiy to recover their lost reputations.
Mr. Tierney then moved to send back
all supplies in excess of the needs, and the
Board passed the motion.
R Superintendent Gannon reported thal
the arches in the Hall of Records were
being made four inches instead of eight
inches, as required by the specifications
and that the specifications were otherwise
departed from. This was referred to the
Committee on Public Buildings.
James Waddicks was then transferret
to be an additional tender at the Hacken
sack free bridge, so that he and Wardei
Grimes will not be able to squabble an;
more.
A resolution was adopted referring al
bills for claims against the county to the
Committee on Fiuunce, with instruction!
to report at the next meeting.
INHARMONIOUS CHARITY.
Hoboken's Mass Meeting to Aid Johns
town's Sufferers Was Rather Lively.
About thirty citizens comprised i
‘ ‘nass’ ’meeting for the flood sufferers at thi
City Hall of Hoboken last night, and evei
with that small number the meeting wai
very inharmonious. Mayor Grassmani
called the meeting to order. Ex-Mayot
Timken was nominated for chairman, bn
he declined in favor of the Mayor.
Colonel B. F. Hart then proposed that i
committee of twenty-one, five from eacl
of the four wards and the Mayor, be ap
pointed to collect subscriptions. The ntim
her was reduced to thirteen and the meet
ing proceeded to business.
Ex-Mayor Timken made a vigorou:
tirade against the Mayor and Council fo:
appropriating #1,000 oi' the city’s monej
without in any way advising the tax
payers of their object. He moved, there
| fore, that the committee collect #1,000 anc
j pay it bock into the city treasury
i The rest of the people present constltu
ting the mass meeting rose to their feei
1 and all clamored for the privilege of be
! ing the lirst to “sit on” Mr. Timken
Councilman Stanton started and every
body in the room said cruel things about
the ex-Mayor. The mass meeting broke
up at half-past ten, having achievec
nothing but the appointment of the com
1 mittee. . ,
This morning the front of the police
] station looks like the sidewalk in front ol
I a large wholesale dry goods store. Al
I the clothes in the city that can be sparec
are dumped there, and good hearted police
men are busy packing them into crates.
The unusual sight of policemen working
has attracted a crowd of small boys and
i girls, and they, in their small way are
doing tlieir best.
Sergeant Kathjen had a mouthful ol
nails, and could not speak. In his hand
he clutched a big hammer, with which he
clubbed the poor head of the nail into the
box. The perspiration was rolling down
- his nose, but he worked hard and soon
had a goodly number of large boxes
packed securely enough for an ocean
voyage.
Policeman Hilly Porter was picking ug
armfuls of clothes and dumping them iutc
the boxes. Judge Michael Meehan wit
there too. He worked in a circle of to
' banco juice, but he wns industrious, lit
could not work without Ills chew
Roundsman Flattery bossed the job, and
proved invaluable with timely hints ane
suggestions. The crates and boxes wili
be shipped away by this, afternoon.
MOKE WEDDING BE HA
The Daughter of Mr. ami Mrs. Lemmers
Married to Mr. Keluhard.
The home of Mr. and Mrs. Henry I,em
merz; on Newark avenue, was the scent
of a pretty wedding last night, when theii
daughter Minnie and Mr. Edward Rein
hard were united in marriage. The spa
cious rooms were profusely decorated
with festoons of smilax, palms and flow
ers.
The bridal party entered the parlors at
eight o’clock, the bride walking with the
bridegroom, and preceded by the ushers,
Mr. Henry Lemmerz, Jr., and Mr. George
Reinhard. Two little girls, nieces of the
bridegroom, were maids of honor, and
Miss Connie Troll was bridesmaid. Mr.
Fred Mitchell attended the groom as best
man. The party stood beneath a large
canopy of roses and ferns while the Rev.
Irving F. Davis performed the ceremony.
The bride wore a beautiful gown of
white faille trimmed with lace. She car
ried a bunch of roses. The presents were
numerous and costly. Among them was
a beautiful offering from the Mission
Band, of which Miss Lemmerz was
leader. A reception followed. Among
the guests were ex-Sheriff and Mrs.
Heintze, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Gallery, Mr.
and Mrs. Reynolds, Mr. and Mrs.
Markets, Mr. and Mrs. Enleys Mr.
and Mrs. Schumaker. Mr. and Mrs. John
Troll, Mr. and Mrs. R. Troll, Miss Gertie
Buckley, Miss Merriditli, Mr. and Mrs.
George Reinhard, the Rev. and Mrs. Irv
ing Davis, Mr. and Mrs. William Rein
hard, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Reinhard, Mr.
and Mrs. Charles Reinhard, Mr. and Mrs.
John Reinhard, Misses Margaret and Jen
nie Reinhard, Mr. Horace Braun, Mr.
Benjamin Halleck, Mr. Frank Reinhard,
Mr. Charles Arnold, Mr. and
Mrs. L. Koelsch, Mr. and Mrs. J. V,
Huerbner, Mr. and Mrs. Bridgart, Mr. and
Mrs. Rochat, Mr. and Mrs. Simon, Mr.
and Mrs. Eugene Frank, Mr. J. Boyd, Mr.
M. Brown, Mr. and Mrs. Montague Red
greve, Prof, and Mrs. Lightfoot, Dr. and
Mrs. McBride, Prof, and Mrs. Mollenhaur,
Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Mackler.
Breunan—Lawless.
A quiet wedding was celebrated on
Wednesday afternoon at St. Patrick’s
Cathedral. Miss .Jennie lawless was the
bride and Mr. Thomas Brennan was the
bridegroom. The Rev. Father Sheehan
officiated. Miss Conners, of New York,
was the bridesmaid and the brother of the
bridegroom was best man. After the
ceremony Mr. and Mrs. Brennarf left for
a trip through New England.
---
A Short Finance Meeting.
It took less than a quarter of an hour
last evening to transact the business of
the Board of Finance and Taxation. All
the members were present but Com
missioner Jordan. Comptroller Dickin
son reported that the receipts for the
week had been #104,500.55, and then after
passing a few claims the meeting ad
journed.
OYELETTE
BY
Hereafter a leading fea
ture of THE SUNDAY
MORNING NEWS will
be a Series of Charming
Novelettes by leading
English and American
authors. These will
occupy considerable
space every week, and
will furnish ENTER
TAINING READING of
the choicest descrip
tion.
The first of the series
will appear next Sun
day. It will he entitled
MR, WESTBROOK'S
INHERITANCE,
THE STRANGE STORY OF A
HIDDEN TESTAMENT.
IT WILL BE
Complete in One Issue.
READ IT IN THE
Sunday
Morning
News,
Price, B Oent».
Order It In Advance From Youi
Newsdealer to Prevent
Disappointmet.
[THE CHEAT ENGLISH REMEDY.
Beecham’s Pills
Fur Bilious and Nervous Disorders.
* Worth a Guinea a Box "-but sold
for 25 cents,
by a 1,1, nBiwim_
William Delaxey, Furntshlng Undertaker, car
riages and camu chairs to let, 34j Grove street, Jer
sey City. ^J-^Telephoup^call-^No
Advertisements Ukdhr the Head of
HEATHS
Will be inserted in the Jersey City News and
the Sunday'1'MoRNttro News at the rate of ten
cents a line for the first insertion; Jive cents aline
for each subsequent insert ion.
DTKD.
AUSTIN Entered into rest, June 6, 1889. Emily J.»
beloved wife of Frank U. Amstlu, and daughter
of Catharine Craw, at her latj residence,
Seventh street.
Funeral from North Baptist Church, on Sunday.
June 9, at one o’clock d, m.
Boston papers please copy.
BYRNE—On Thursday, Jiuie <L 1889. Edward Burns
beloved husband of Ann Byrne, aged seventy
; five years.
Relatives and friends of the family are respect
fully requested to attend his funeral on Saturday
morning, June 8, at nine o’clock, from his late resi
dence. No. 195 Ninth street: theneo to St. Michael s
Church, where a solemn high muss of requiem will
be offered for the happy repose of his soul.
McCLAIN—Departed this life, suddenly, of pneu
monia, on Juno 4, !f»9, Robert McClain, Sr.
Notice Of funeral In Saturday’s papers.
OCH—On Thursday, June 6. 1889, at his late resl
dence, No. 179 Palisade avenue, George Och, In
the sixty-fourth year of his age.
Notice of funeral hereafter.
PARSON—On Friday, June 7, 1889, Thomas Parson,
beloved son or Alice and the |late Joseph
Parson, aged four years and six months.
Relatives and friends of the family are respect
fully iuvlted to attend his funeral from the resh
denco of his grandfather, Richard Wade, No. 187
Erie street, on Sunday, June 9, at two o’clock p. m.
WHITMORE—In this city, June 6. 1889, George War
ren, youngest son of John and Anna A. Whit
more, aged one year and six months.
Relatives and friends are Invited to attend the
funeral services from the residence of his parents,
No. 296 Fourth street, on Saturday, June 8, at three
p.m.^_ [ |||B
M.J.BOYLAN,
Funeral Director,
198 Pavonia five., Jersey City.
real estate. _
TJOR HOUSES AND LOTS IN JERSEY CITY
r BERGEN, GREENVILLE, BAYONNE AND BER
GEN POINT, CALL OR WRITE TO
JOHN N. BRUNS,
No. 137 Ocean Avene, larsey ciijr.
No. 77 Danforts Avene, Greenville.
SEND FOR LIST OF CITY AND COUNTRY PROP
_ERTY.__
At Auction.
LEWIS E. WOOD, Auctioneer,
Office and Salesroom. No. 83 Montgomery at., J. C.,
will sell without re<erve on MONDAY JUNE 10. at
half-past ten o’clock a. m., prompt, the entire
Furniture Contained m House, 238 Seventh St.
f art of the Estate of ex-Judge Garretson, deceased,
n part of Walnut Parlor Suits, Brussels Carpets,
Book Case, Centre Tables, Fancy Parlor Chairs and
Rodkers, Pier Mirrors and Cornices, Hall and Stair
Carpets, Walnut Chamber Suits, Hair and other Mat
tresses. Wardrobe, Lounges, Bed and Table Linen,
Extension Table, Dluing Chairs, China, Crockery
and Glassware; also a large lot of Firewood, and
many other articles of Furniture not mentioned, all
of which will be sold to the highest bidder. LEWIS
E. WOOD, Real Estate and General Auctioneer, No.
83 Montgomery street, Jersey City.
Store To Let.
TO RENT—A CORNER STORE, WITH OR WITH
out fixtures, suitable for liquor or grocery busi
ness; low rent. Apply to C. H. Le Vatre, No. 191
Montgomery street. __
HELP WANTED.
Only Ten Cents for
Three Lines under
this heading.
Male.
WANTED-YOUNG MAN WITH KNOWLEDGE
of grocery or tea business, to run a route
in Jersey City. A party with some trade, and good
references, may hear of a good opening by ad
dressing, T. B., News Office.
Female.
WANTED A COOK AND LAUNDRESS. NO. 479
Jersey avenue.__
WANTED—A GIRL TO DO GENERAL HGUSE
work. No 85 Oxford avenue.__
ORK WANTED BY A RESPECTABLE
woman to go out washing or ironing? by the
day. No. 258 Railroad avenue, one flight up.
When you call at the above addresses,
mention this paper._____
FURNISHED BOOMS.
Only Ten Cents for
Three Lines under
this heading.
Furnished room to let? terms moderate
No. 162 Third street.
FURNISHED ROOMsTOR SINGLE GENTLEMEN
at reasonable rent. No. 171 Fifth street._
H andsomely furnished rooms to let to
one or two parties; also a parlor; suitable for
doctor or dentist. No. 219 Grand street.
NBOR TWO GENTLEMEN CAN HAVE-FRONT
alcove room in private fumily. No. 223 York
street.__
PLEASANT FURNISHED ROOM; ALSO HALL
room. No. 283 Sixth street.
"'POLET^AL A ROE, NICELY FURNISHED. COOL
l room; gas and bath; family private. No. 1TC
Fourth street. _
rr\0 LET- FURNISHED, A FRONT ROOM AND
X front parlor; suitable for doctor or dressmaker.
No. 5 Wayne street.
rO LET-FURNISHED ROOM WITH ALCOVE
L to one or two gentlemen, on second floor, in a
private house, with privilege of bath room on same
floor. Apply at No. 21 Erie street, corner First.
7f6 LET—NEATLY FURNISHED ROOM FOR
I gentlemen; gas and bath. No. 558J^ Jersey ave
nue._
Large furnished room; also hall room
in a private house. No 89 Jewett avenue.
4117 SECOND STREET—A LARGE SOUTH
^ x 4 room and hall bedroom to let, furnished;
gas and bath; convenient to both ferries.
Unfurnished Booms.
rFO LET-A FINE FLOOR, FOUR ROOMS IN
X good order; convenient to both ferries. Inquire
at No. £89 Grove street, Jersey City.
2*1 1 —THREE FINE LARGE ROOMS ON SEC
£*>X 1. ond floor; nicely painted and papered;
water in kitchen; private house; convenient to cars
and ferry. No. 3U Golden street, corner Vurlck.
When you call at the above addresses
mention this paper.
LOST AND FO UXD.
IIBERAL REWARD FOR RETURN OF A FEMALE
j pug (log; star ou breast. No. 144 Mercer street.
OST-A GOLD RING ON GRAND OR GROVE
j street, between Grand and Montgomery street.
A reward will be paid if returned to No. 52 Morris
BURR BREWING CO.
LAGER BEER.
227 West 18th Street,
NEW YORK.
Daft Electric Light Co.,
115 BROADWAY, N. I.
STATIONARY ELECTRIC MOTORS. ELECTRIC RAILWAYS
AND POWER STATIONS. STORAflE BATTERIES.
J^N CHANCERY OF NEW JERSEY.
Between James Murray and Timothy Murray,
Complainants, and Dennis Murray, Thomas Murray
and Cornelius Murray, Defendants.
On bill for partition. _ ^
By virtue of a ttnal decree of the Court of Chan
cery of New Jersey, made in the above entitled
cause and bearing date the twenty-ninth day of
March, in the vear eighteen hundred and eighty
nine, 1 shall offer for sale at public vendue, at my
office in the Weldon Building, No. 76 Montgomery
street. Jersey City, New Jersey, on
MONDAY, the Twenty fourth day of June next,
at two o’clock, in the afternoon, all that certain lot,
tract or parcel of land and premises situate, lying
and being in the City of Jersey City, in the County
of Hudson and State of New Jersey, bounded and
described as follows, vlx.:—Beginning at a point in
the line drawn parallel with North Fifth (now Thir
teenth) street and distant one hundred (lOO) feet
southerly therefrom, and one hundred (100) feet
westerly from Prospect (now Henderson) street;
( thence running easterly along said line parallel
with North Fifth street thirty-six (86) feet to an
alleyway of eight (8) feet in width, extending to
North Fifth street; thence northerly along said
alleyway forty-five (45; feet to another alleyway of
five (6) feet in width, running westerly parallel to
North Fifth street; thence westerly along the line
of said alleway last mentioned thirty six (86) feet;
I thence southerly parallel with Prospect street
i forty-five (45) feet to the point or place of begin
ning. Together with all and singular the heredtta
1 ments and appurtenances to the said premises bo
: lunging or in any way (WlHM*
Special Master Is Chancery of New Jersey.
I Dated May 22, 1889.
SITUATIONS AND WORK
WANTED.
Three Lines FREE
under this heading
until September 1st.
Mules.
A BOY WOULD LIKE A SITUATION AS OFFICE
boy. Address Answer, No. 141 Morris street,
Jersey City.______
TiTANTED -BOYS AT N. J. STEAM LAUNDRY CO.
YV No. 163 Pine street. _. __
117ANTED—SMART YOUNG MAN (GERMAN PR®
W ferred) at the grocery and butcher shop, No
680 Summit avenue. _.
WANTED-YOUNG MAN TO TAKE CARE OF A
horse and make himself usefuL Apply at No.
Hi) Fair view avenue._
OtJNG MAN OK 19 YEAR8 WOULD LIKE A
situation in some shop; machine shop preferred.
Address P. M., No. 563 William street, J. C. H.
Female.
A SWEDISH GIRL WISHES A SITUATION TO
take care of children. Best reference. No. 73
Madison street, first floor, Hoboken, N. J. Address
P. 0„ News office._
I WOMAN AFTER BREAKING UP HER HOME
A wants a situation; good cook aud laundress;
hus a boy eleven yearn old; willing and obliging;
could assist in light housework: would prefer to
go a short distance In the country. Apply at No.
473 Newark avenue.__
American girl wishes a situation to
do general housework in small private family;
age 20. No. All Fifth street*•
A YOUNG GIRL WISHES A SITUATION IN SMALL
family to do general housework or upstairs
work. Apply at No. in Essex street.
APwESPECTABLE young girl wishes a
situation as chambermaid or waitress: willing
and obliging. Call for two days at No. 186 Morris
street. G. R.__
A SITUATION WANTED BY A STRONG. WILL
ing girl to do general housework. Call at No.
601 Henderson street, top floor._
A YOUNG GIRL WISHES SITUATION IN A
small private family to do light housework.
Call at No. 481 Grove street, up two bights.
A WOMAN WANTS TO GO (JUT BY THE DaY
to do washing and ironing or house cleaning.
No. 2582 Railroad avenus._
A YOUNG GIRL WISHES A SITUATION TO
take care of children or help with upstairs
work. Call at No. 101 Bright Street, second floor.
A WOMAN WISHES TO GO OUT WASHING AND
ironing or cloaning, or take It home. No. 44
Henderson street, top floor, front.__
DAY’S WORK WANTED BY A STEADY, SOBER
woman; don’t object to washing, Ironing or
otflee cleaning. Call all week at No. 518 Henderson
street.__ .
Respectable girl yvishes a situation in
a small private family; good reference. No.
205 Van Vorst street, Mrs. Crosby.
SITUATION WANTED BY A GOOD COOK AND
laundress; no objection to a boarding house.
Call at No. 137 Eighth street, third floor; no cards.
SITUATION WANTED BY A RESPECTABLE
O girl to cook, wash and iron in a private family.
Beat of reference. No. 242 Wayne street._
SITUATION WANTED BY AN ENGLISH GIRL TO
do housework. No. 236 First street.__
SITUATION WANTED BY A YOUNG GIRL TO
do general housework; good reference; no cards;
No. Sly First street. ____
SITUATION WANTED BY A SWEEDISH GIRL
lately landed to do upstairs work. No. 146 Morris
street.___
^ genera] housework; two years’ reference. No.
216 Wayne street._
SITUATION WANTED BY A GOOD COOK AND
laundress, or wonld do general housework. Call
at No. 007 Second street.__
QITUATION WANTED BY A FIRST-CLA83 COOK
TO or would do housework In a small family; will
ing to go on the Hill. Call for two days at No. 193
Montgomery street._ «_ _
qituation wanted as nurse, call at
C7 last place, No. 11 East Hamilton place.__
Situation wanted by a german girl, to
do general housework. No, 1U7 Morris street.
Situation wanted by a good cook and
laundress, or do general housework.
_Call at No. 384 Second street. _
TWO RESPECTABLE GIRLS WISH SITUATIONS
to do housework in small private families
where they will be kindly treated. Can be seen at
No. 378 Seventh street.
ANTED-BY GI RLTaGE NINETEEN, SITU A*
tion In store, or any light capacity. Address,
C. W., 110 Woodward street.
ANTED-A RESPECTABOfWOMAN WANTS
washing to do at home; good drying ground.
No. 47 Union street._
WORK WANTED TO GO OUT WASHING. IRON
ing, or to do any kind of work. No. 303 Grand
street.' _
ll/'ORK WANTED BY A RESPECTABLE WOMAN
t > washing by the day or take it home. Call at
No. 10 Germania avenue. _
WANTED—SITUATION FOR YOUNG IRISH
girl; first place; to do light housework or up
stairs work; willing to. go In the country. Call at
No. 290 Varick street.__
YtrANTE1>-A situation as laundress and
it chambermaid or to do general housework.
Apply present employer’s, No. 3<0 Grove street.
WOMAN WISHES TO TaKF. IN WASHING AT
home or go out by the day. Call all week at
No. 402 Second street.__
WORK WANTED TO GO OUT BY THE DAY
washing or cleaning. Mrs. W., No. 197 Grand
street,
WORK WANTED TO GO OUT BY THE DA if
washing. Ironing or housecleaning. No. 223
Railroad avenue.__
W^NTED-A GOOD GIRL FOR GENERAL HOUSE
work. No. 133 Wayne street.
VOUNG LADY WISHES A POSITION IN BAKERY
X or confectionery. Inquire at No. S43 Grove
street, first floor.
Young girl wishes a situation to do
xipstairs work or mind children; city or couu
try. Call for two days at No. 8 Coles street.
YOUNG girl wishes a situation to do
l general housework or take care of children; no
objection to the country. Apply for two days at No.
242 Washington street.
BOARDERS WANTED.
T?URNISHED ROOMS TO LET WITH BOARD IN
-T private family: convenient to Montgomery
street cars. No. 182 Summit avenue.
OiNE LARGE FRONT AND ONE HALL ROOM TO
' let; southern exposure; substantial table. No.
74 Grand street.__
TO LET-ROOM ON SECOND FLOOR AND HaLL
room; also table board._No. 147 Grand street._
P“ LEASANT, LARGE ROOM TO' LET, WITH
board, at No. Jersey aveane
rpo LET-FRONT ALCOVE’ ROOM OVER PAR
1 lor, with good board; hot and cold water. No.
43 Ocean avenue.
rpo LET—WITH BOARD, LARGE PLEASANT
A room; good location; terms reasonable. No. 128
Wayne street, near Jersey avenue.
1 PZl GRAND STREET-ELEGANT, COOL, CLEAN
L o A rooms; every convenience; excellent table;
summer prices. _
When you call at the above addressee*
mention this paper.
BOARD WANTED.
Only Ten Cents for
Three Lines under
this heading.
YJOARD WANTED IN PRIVATE FAMILY, NEAR
I) York and Barrow street#. Address A. F„
News office.
VfICELY FURNISHED ROOMS TO LET, WITH OB
L * .without board; gas and bath. No. 652 Jersey
avenue, near Hamilton Park.
TWO GIRLS CAN PROCURE GOOD BOARD ANB
A pleasant rooms. No. 75 Coles street.
_ FOR SALE. __
Only Ten Cents for
Three Lines under
this heading.
/"IHIOKERINQ PIANO FOR SALE CHEAP. NO.
Vy_V2J4 Sackett street._
1X)R SALE-HANDSOME PONY, DOG CART AN!
harness. Also buggy. W. Hartwlg, No. 103 St
Paul avenue, Jersey City Heights.
DRESSMAKERS.
DR|fw^?K?eYn,D^g^g^,Dcg»
LA WYERS.^.
THS£S

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